LupusBelmont
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Hi, I'm going going to be studying a BSc Chemistry starting September and I was wondering how much printing is needed for a chemistry degree? Is it worth buying a printer or are the uni printers enough?

I've read through some answers for physics, but non I could find were specific to chemistry.
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artful_lounger
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Doubt there would be signifcantly more than most STEM subjects; you'll probably just need to print cover sheets for coursework and lab reports you've written I imagine. Honestly though even if your course does require a lot of printing, it's still probably worth just using uni printers because commercial home printers tend to be universally garbage and it'll be the kind of thing you use like once a month but then have to spend 2 hours troubleshooting to get it to work >.>

CheeseIsVeg might be able to advise on how they found printing requirements to be in a chemistry degree though
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LupusBelmont
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Doubt there would be signifcantly more than most STEM subjects; you'll probably just need to print cover sheets for coursework and lab reports you've written I imagine. Honestly though even if your course does require a lot of printing, it's still probably worth just using uni printers because commercial home printers tend to be universally garbage and it'll be the kind of thing you use like once a month but then have to spend 2 hours troubleshooting to get it to work >.>

CheeseIsVeg might be able to advise on how they found printing requirements to be in a chemistry degree though
Thanks, I'll give him a message

Thing is am heavily inclined to working from books and paper rather than of a screen, not sure if this would effect the amount. Not sure how much or even what format handouts, coursework etc. is going to be given.
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CheeseIsVeg
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Doubt there would be signifcantly more than most STEM subjects; you'll probably just need to print cover sheets for coursework and lab reports you've written I imagine. Honestly though even if your course does require a lot of printing, it's still probably worth just using uni printers because commercial home printers tend to be universally garbage and it'll be the kind of thing you use like once a month but then have to spend 2 hours troubleshooting to get it to work >.>

CheeseIsVeg might be able to advise on how they found printing requirements to be in a chemistry degree though
:hat2:
(Original post by LupusBelmont)
Thanks, I'll give her a message

Thing is am heavily inclined to working from books and paper rather than of a screen, not sure if this would effect the amount. Not sure how much or even what format handouts, coursework etc. is going to be given.
Hi there

Check your Uni, for mine there was a printing allowance (the University gave us about £30 worth of printing credit for Uni printers each semester). This is because they had a policy of never giving us print outs (instead we had to print everything before sessions/lectures etc.)
Obviously this depends on the University.

What I would say is I printed out quite a lot in years 1-2, onwards I didn't do so much printing.
I used Uni printers a lot and actually had a printing room in my 1st year halls accommodation so even though I had my own printer, I literally barely used it! If this is similar for you, I would say you can definitely get away without bringing your printer tbh (especially if you're not far from the library).

I am a bit like you with wanting to work from paper/books and not screens. I definitely printed lots in first and second year (lecture handouts, workshop questions, tutorial questions etc.).
With books check with a local bookshop e.g.: before I started my degree there was a "First Year Chemistry bundle" of textbooks that was cheaper than Amazon at the time so very good value. The same bookshop also sold second hand books that were cheaper.
Again what I would actually say is (depending on your exact modules) you probably won't need to look at a textbook (unless you want to lookup the answers to tutorial questions there :innocent: ) and I would recommend just saving money and getting the books out of the library. If you are concerned the book might need to be recalled due to demand, just give your chemistry librarian an email and they are usually really happy to sort a pdf version or get more copies to suit demand. You can then print pages from the textbook that are useful for you or just get the book out again :yy:

I hope this helps - some great tips and things I wish I had done when I started! I might have to sell my old textbooks that are new and hardly used haha (well maybe except for the Clayden ).

Let me know if I can help with any other questions you have,
Cheese
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