The Student Room Group

Study dentistry in the us as a uk student

I am in year 11 going into year 12 in a few months and was wondering how you apply for university for dentistry in the US from the UK?
Just wondering why you want to study in the US? You can't apply for dentistry in the US when you finish A-levels as all their dental programs are post graduate. You have to first study a 4 year undergrad course there (not sure if they accept degrees from the UK) but it would overall take you 7-8 years in the US to become a dentist compared to 5 years in the UK.
I've applied to dentistry in the UK this year so feel free to ask me anything about the process.
Reply 3
Original post by hungrysalamander
Just wondering why you want to study in the US? You can't apply for dentistry in the US when you finish A-levels as all their dental programs are post graduate. You have to first study a 4 year undergrad course there (not sure if they accept degrees from the UK) but it would overall take you 7-8 years in the US to become a dentist compared to 5 years in the UK.

I guess i just want to study abroad and somewhere where they speak english. Its also the fact that i can study multiple subjects i enjoy which i can get minors in and while still geting a major in biochem and using that to get into dentistry, which as far as i understand, i wouldn't be able to do in the UK as i would go straight into studying dentistry after 6th form. On top of this, i feel like the US also has slightly better job opportunities than i would get here in the UK.
As others have said, in order to study dentistry in the US, you need a bachelor's degree. If you're 100% set on studying dentistry, you're better off staying in the UK I'm afraid.
I'd recommend looking into the ib if you want to study different subjects, which will be much cheaper than studying in the US. The ib is also more accepted at unis there than a levels. But if you're set on studying there then think of plan b's incase you finish your bsc and didnt get into dental school afterwards. In terms of job opportunities, they're both the same. You're guaranteed FY training in the NHS when you finish and while you get higher pay in the US, you will also incur a lot more debt.
Original post by hungrysalamander
I'd recommend looking into the ib if you want to study different subjects, which will be much cheaper than studying in the US. The ib is also more accepted at unis there than a levels. But if you're set on studying there then think of plan b's incase you finish your bsc and didnt get into dental school afterwards. In terms of job opportunities, they're both the same. You're guaranteed FY training in the NHS when you finish and while you get higher pay in the US, you will also incur a lot more debt.

Unless OP is a US citizen, there is also no guarantee they will even be able to work in the US past their OPT (I.e. for an extended period of time).
(edited 3 years ago)
Reply 7
Original post by hungrysalamander
I'd recommend looking into the ib if you want to study different subjects, which will be much cheaper than studying in the US. The ib is also more accepted at unis there than a levels. But if you're set on studying there then think of plan b's incase you finish your bsc and didnt get into dental school afterwards. In terms of job opportunities, they're both the same. You're guaranteed FY training in the NHS when you finish and while you get higher pay in the US, you will also incur a lot more debt.

Oh okay but I've already chosen my a-levels a couple months ago so i don't think i can change it to ib now. What if i were to study in new zealand? Because i really do want to study abroad and im definitely going to be studying dentistry. I will also be applying to UK universities just incase as well.
(edited 3 years ago)
Original post by hungrysalamander
I'd recommend looking into the ib if you want to study different subjects, which will be much cheaper than studying in the US. The ib is also more accepted at unis there than a levels. But if you're set on studying there then think of plan b's incase you finish your bsc and didnt get into dental school afterwards. In terms of job opportunities, they're both the same. You're guaranteed FY training in the NHS when you finish and while you get higher pay in the US, you will also incur a lot more debt.

Just want to clarify that if you apply to US universities with A-levels and not IB, you won't be at a disadvantage.
Original post by Coffeekeep
I am in year 11 going into year 12 in a few months and was wondering how you apply for university for dentistry in the US from the UK?

hii i was wondering where you ended up applying? im literally in the same positions as you:P
Original post by username5319484
I've applied to dentistry in the UK this year so feel free to ask me anything about the process.
Hey i was just curious, are you planning on coming back to the US after finishing dental school in the UK?

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending