Can one transfer from Oxford to Cambridge for Maths? When?

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Anonymous #1
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Suppose someone is studying Maths at Oxford. Is there a way to transfer to Cambridge for the same degree? If so, when is the soonest that it can happen? (i.e., in which year). Can one do the 4th year (Masters) from Cambridge after three years at Oxford?
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artful_lounger
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Cambridge don't accept transfers, you would need to reapply for first year entry. They also don't (to my knowledge) accept applications from students currently at other universities, so you would need to drop out in order to apply.

However, you can take the 4th year of their undergraduate degree as a 1 year masters, the MASt Mathematics (i.e. Part III Maths). I gather it's not uncommon for graduates from Oxford to do the MASt (either after supplicating for the BA or after graduating from the MMath at Oxford). This wouldn't be transferring though, it would be after you graduated.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Cambridge don't accept transfers, you would need to reapply for first year entry. They also don't (to my knowledge) accept applications from students currently at other universities, so you would need to drop out in order to apply.

However, you can take the 4th year of their undergraduate degree as a 1 year masters, the MASt Mathematics (i.e. Part III Maths). I gather it's not uncommon for graduates from Oxford to do the MASt (either after supplicating for the BA or after graduating from the MMath at Oxford). This wouldn't be transferring though, it would be after you graduated.
Would you recommend dropping out of Oxford and applying to Cambridge to do all 4 years there? Since Cambridge supposedly has the superior Maths course. Is the difference in the courses significant ? Or would it not matter if one did BA from Ox and MA from Cam?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Would you recommend dropping out of Oxford and applying to Cambridge to do all 4 years there? Since Cambridge supposedly has the superior Maths course. Is the difference in the courses significant ? Or would it not matter if one did BA from Ox and MA from Cam?
To me, best to complete your Ox degree and continue with a postgrad at Cam. Many top minds have done so including Stephen Hawking.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Wired_1800)
To me, best to complete your Ox degree and continue with a postgrad at Cam. Many top minds have done so including Stephen Hawking.
But as far as I know, mostly all famous mathematicians/scientists were undergraduates at Cambridge, instead of Oxford.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Would you recommend dropping out of Oxford and applying to Cambridge to do all 4 years there? Since Cambridge supposedly has the superior Maths course. Is the difference in the courses significant ? Or would it not matter if one did BA from Ox and MA from Cam?
Cambridge probably does technically have a better reputation for maths, but it would seem completely insane to me to drop out of Oxford just so you could re-apply to Cambridge. Just complete your maths degree from Oxford lol. Maths at Oxford obviously still has a good reputation.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
Cambridge probably does technically have a better reputation for maths, but it would seem completely insane to me to drop out of Oxford just so you could re-apply to Cambridge. Just complete your maths degree from Oxford lol. Maths at Oxford obviously still has a good reputation.
Oxford does have a good reputation, there’s no denying that. But it’s still ‘second best’, which is infuriating. :mad:
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mnot
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You could probably do a stand alone masters at the opposing university, the same way any student can apply for a masters program. That would require getting the bachelors first; although it would only any be worth doing this if one of them had very specific expertise is an area you wanted to research or something as the funding for postgrad & undergrad are two different systems.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Would you recommend dropping out of Oxford and applying to Cambridge to do all 4 years there? Since Cambridge supposedly has the superior Maths course. Is the difference in the courses significant ? Or would it not matter if one did BA from Ox and MA from Cam?
No, there is not enough difference between the courses to merit that. Also realistically most of the "Cambridge is better for maths" stuff is historical and/or down to the rivalry between the two unis. In reality they're pretty comparable overall, and you'll learn largely the same material in the first two years, and they have similar options in third year largely. Plus you can do the fourth year papers of either course at the other through their respective masters courses.

A lot of people who did maths at Oxford go to Cambridge and vice versa (also Warwick and Imperial; there's a lot of movement from UG to PG between these unis as they're all broadly excellent for maths research and correspondingly highly regarded for their undergrad teaching in the subjects due to the depth and breadth of their courses). Realistically Cambridge and Oxford at the undergraduate maths level are essentially equivalent (also Imperial and Warwick, although the latter gets debated sometimes as being second fiddle to the other three).

It's only at the postgrad research level where the differences between them become more pronounced, and that's not in the context of one being outright "better" than the others, but reflective of their differening research staff and interests/focuses. So one may be better for a particular field than another one (e.g. Oxford for quantum computing being the strongest of the four as I understand and Cambridge for fluid mechanics related work probably being stronger than the others).

I think it would be a very poor judgement to drop out of Oxford to reapply to Cambridge for maths. You would be better off finishing your undergrad there and then applying to Part III for a masters if you wish. Part III is probably the best known and most notable part of the Cambridge course anyway (which not even all Cambridge mathmos progress to, as you need a 1st in Part II to continue to Part III normally as I understand).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
No, there is not enough difference between the courses to merit that. Also realistically most of the "Cambridge is better for maths" stuff is historical and/or down to the rivalry between the two unis. In reality they're pretty comparable overall, and you'll learn largely the same material in the first two years, and they have similar options in third year largely. Plus you can do the fourth year papers of either course at the other through their respective masters courses.

A lot of people who did maths at Oxford go to Cambridge and vice versa (also Warwick and Imperial; there's a lot of movement from UG to PG between these unis as they're all broadly excellent for maths research and correspondingly highly regarded for their undergrad teaching in the subjects due to the depth and breadth of their courses). Realistically Cambridge and Oxford at the undergraduate maths level are essentially equivalent (also Imperial and Warwick, although the latter gets debated sometimes as being second fiddle to the other three).

It's only at the postgrad research level where the differences between them become more pronounced, and that's not in the context of one being outright "better" than the others, but reflective of their differening research staff and interests/focuses. So one may be better for a particular field than another one (e.g. Oxford for quantum computing being the strongest of the four as I understand and Cambridge for fluid mechanics related work probably being stronger than the others).

I think it would be a very poor judgement to drop out of Oxford to reapply to Cambridge for maths. You would be better off finishing your undergrad there and then applying to Part III for a masters if you wish. Part III is probably the best known and most notable part of the Cambridge course anyway (which not even all Cambridge mathmos progress to, as you need a 1st in Part II to continue to Part III normally as I understand).
Thanks, that’s helpful. However, I do doubt that the belief that ‘Cam is better than Ox for maths’ is purely due to historical reasons. Cambridge has much more Fields Medals than Oxford, for example. How can that be purely coincidental? Also, for postgraduate study, which of the four would you say is the best for PURE maths?
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by Anonymous)
But as far as I know, mostly all famous mathematicians/scientists were undergraduates at Cambridge, instead of Oxford.
That does not matter. You are already at Oxford. You have the best start, you can build from there rather than try to start again.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Suppose someone is studying Maths at Oxford. Is there a way to transfer to Cambridge for the same degree? If so, when is the soonest that it can happen? (i.e., in which year). Can one do the 4th year (Masters) from Cambridge after three years at Oxford?
Sorry but you come across as very spoilt. Many would dream to have the opportunity to study a Maths degree at Oxford, and it is probably the 2nd best place in the world to study it aside from the thousands of universities. Many great mathematicians have done an undergraduate at Oxford and a Masters's at Cambridge or even Harvard. Just be grateful and try your best for your degree. A first from oxford is better than a 2.1 from Cambridge, even for Maths.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sorry but you come across as very spoilt. Many would dream to have the opportunity to study a Maths degree at Oxford, and it is probably the 2nd best place in the world to study it aside from the thousands of universities. Many great mathematicians have done an undergraduate at Oxford and a Masters's at Cambridge or even Harvard. Just be grateful and try your best for your degree. A first from oxford is better than a 2.1 from Cambridge, even for Maths.
I empathize with you, but some people just have extremely high standards. What can you do 🤷🏻*♂️
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I empathize with you, but some people just have extremely high standards. What can you do 🤷🏻*♂️
Warwick's Mathematics course is arguably more competitive than Oxbridge's Maths course. What do you have to say for students who chose Warwick over Oxbridge?
At the end of the day, all the differences between these top institutions are negligible and all open the same doors.
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Sorry but you come across as very spoilt. Many would dream to have the opportunity to study a Maths degree at Oxford, and it is probably the 2nd best place in the world to study it aside from the thousands of universities. Many great mathematicians have done an undergraduate at Oxford and a Masters's at Cambridge or even Harvard. Just be grateful and try your best for your degree. A first from oxford is better than a 2.1 from Cambridge, even for Maths.
This post suggests that op was gifted his place at Oxford. Obviously that is not the case and instead they worked very hard for it. Fix up
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sofiavxx
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Stay where you are for undergraduate. Lets say you drop out and are rejected from Cambridge. Then what? You have an amazing opportunity and the small differences in a course are not worth risking it all. I recommend you finish your undergraduate degree at Oxford and then apply to Cambridge
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Warwick's Mathematics course is arguably more competitive than Oxbridge's Maths course. What do you have to say for students who chose Warwick over Oxbridge?
At the end of the day, all the differences between these top institutions are negligible and all open the same doors.
I don’t know about that. Why is Oxbridge regarded as better than Warwick then?
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks, that’s helpful. However, I do doubt that the belief that ‘Cam is better than Ox for maths’ is purely due to historical reasons. Cambridge has much more Fields Medals than Oxford, for example. How can that be purely coincidental? Also, for postgraduate study, which of the four would you say is the best for PURE maths?
I dont keep on track of most fields medallists, I do know the 2018 fields medallist at Cambridge (Prof Birkar) did his undergrad at the University of Tehran then got his PhD from Nottingham and only moved to Cambridge as a fellow never as a student.

Why bring this up, it shows you dont need to do your undergrad studies at a very specific university. Just get the degree, then if you want to pursue mathematics in academia you can look at which universities offer expertise in the very specific area you are interested in for masters or research...

If you had an Oxford maths offer it would be foolish imo to give this up to re-apply to Cambridge because you believe tit is marginally better, especially for undergraduate study.
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Celtic Conjurer
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I think it would be very silly to do and others have already explained how there is no real difference in prestige between the two. You’ve literally got a place at Oxford which many people would kill for. Imagine dropping out and then being rejected by Cambridge.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
This post suggests that op was gifted his place at Oxford. Obviously that is not the case and instead they worked very hard for it. Fix up
I feel as though for Maths especially it is a skill. There's no denying OP has worked incredibly hard to get into Oxford, like all people who go to the elite universities do but to compare Oxford and Cambridge, you're looking trimming down to hairs. I would predict both have the same teaching but Cambridge has a better reputation because of the alumni that came from there. OP can achieve great things from Oxford; both open the same doors.
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