cytoplasm420
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how do you structure an unseen poetry answer for the top marks

what is an example of a good point?
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heldbygrace
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Do an introduction talking about the structure, rhyming scheme, mood and ethos of the writer.
Then pick out about 3 quotes from the beginning middle and end of the poem.
Do a paragraph on each quote, talking about the technique, mood it creates, and how it proves the ethos.
Perhaps do a very short conclusion, maybe say whether you like the poem or not, talk about whether it’s artful and fitting to the genre.

I’m not quite sure what you mean by a good point?? If you explain more I may be able to help you with that.

Hope this helps
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cytoplasm420
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(Original post by heldbygrace)
Do an introduction talking about the structure, rhyming scheme, mood and ethos of the writer.
Then pick out about 3 quotes from the beginning middle and end of the poem.
Do a paragraph on each quote, talking about the technique, mood it creates, and how it proves the ethos.
Perhaps do a very short conclusion, maybe say whether you like the poem or not, talk about whether it’s artful and fitting to the genre.

I’m not quite sure what you mean by a good point?? If you explain more I may be able to help you with that.

Hope this helps
what do you mean by ethos?

for the question about the point- like the first sentence

thankyou!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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heldbygrace
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(Original post by cytoplasm420)
what do you mean by ethos?

for the question about the point- like the first sentence

thankyou!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ethos is like what the writer/poet is trying to say. People don't write things for no reason, so it's your job as a reader to work out what their reasoning is and even see how you respond to it.

Ah ok, to make it simple, here is a practice essay I did (grade 8, sorry I don't have any my grade 9 ones):


Spoiler:
Show
The poem ‘Do not go gentle into that good night’ is an instructive, motivational poem with an ethos of not letting people die quietly. The writer wants people to realise that just because they’ve had a full life doesn’t mean it should loose its full at the end. Though the poem uses lots of moral language with sibilant sounds, the writer is carrying a strong ethos that he gets across by using repetitive imperatives and emotions that connotate anger (‘rage’).

At the beginning of the poem the writer uses the verb ‘burn’. This verb creates a reactive feeling at puts across a quite angry mood. Using it in the context of ‘old age’ it creates quite a confusing message. He’s trying to get the audience to understand the urgency and action of the way he wants people to feel old age, however it could also be taken as quite inconsiderate – old people should be able to relax and take their days as it comes, because not all have the ability to be active and ‘burn’.
In the middle of the poem the writer uses personification to describe ‘the sun in flight’. This image creates both a mood of sadness and regret as it describes the ever ticking of time, but also of happiness as it connotates days well spent. The writer uses it to describe how he feels that people enjoy the happiness of life while it lasts, but also at the same time are wasting it away, as death and old age come so quickly. This is something most readers can identify with, however most people, when looking back on an long fulfilled life do not feel it’s something they’ve wasted.

At the end of the poem the writer uses the juxtaposition of the words ‘curse, bless’ to show how he longs for a reaction from his, presumably passed father. This creates a mood of sympathy for him. He misses his father so much that anything, whether good or bad, he would take to feel or hear his father. This perhaps further explains his ethos: he felt that his father’s life was not lived to the full, or he died in vain. The reader finds it easier to agree with this somewhat controversial ethos once they can understand the reasoning behind it.

The repetition at the end of every other 3-line verse of the poem of ‘rage, rage against the dying of the light.’ Creates a repetitive outpouring of negative emotion, that helps to bring forth the poet’s opinion however it does not quite match with the figurative, gentleness of the rest of the poem. Similarly, the imperative in the title, also repeated also at the end lines of verses ‘Do not go gentle into that good night’ almost juxtaposes itself; as its being firm with ‘do not’ but gentle with the word ‘gently’. I think this effects the way the ethos is put across, it makes it hard to relate with as you aren’t entirely sure what exactly mood and feeling writer is trying to convey.


You're welcome :bigsmile:
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Kundana Amudala
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(Original post by cytoplasm420)
how do you structure an unseen poetry answer for the top marks

what is an example of a good point?
This is something my English teacher gave us ... hope this helps!
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cytoplasm420
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(Original post by heldbygrace)
Ethos is like what the writer/poet is trying to say. People don't write things for no reason, so it's your job as a reader to work out what their reasoning is and even see how you respond to it.

Ah ok, to make it simple, here is a practice essay I did (grade 8, sorry I don't have any my grade 9 ones):


Spoiler:
Show
The poem ‘Do not go gentle into that good night’ is an instructive, motivational poem with an ethos of not letting people die quietly. The writer wants people to realise that just because they’ve had a full life doesn’t mean it should loose its full at the end. Though the poem uses lots of moral language with sibilant sounds, the writer is carrying a strong ethos that he gets across by using repetitive imperatives and emotions that connotate anger (‘rage’).

At the beginning of the poem the writer uses the verb ‘burn’. This verb creates a reactive feeling at puts across a quite angry mood. Using it in the context of ‘old age’ it creates quite a confusing message. He’s trying to get the audience to understand the urgency and action of the way he wants people to feel old age, however it could also be taken as quite inconsiderate – old people should be able to relax and take their days as it comes, because not all have the ability to be active and ‘burn’.
In the middle of the poem the writer uses personification to describe ‘the sun in flight’. This image creates both a mood of sadness and regret as it describes the ever ticking of time, but also of happiness as it connotates days well spent. The writer uses it to describe how he feels that people enjoy the happiness of life while it lasts, but also at the same time are wasting it away, as death and old age come so quickly. This is something most readers can identify with, however most people, when looking back on an long fulfilled life do not feel it’s something they’ve wasted.

At the end of the poem the writer uses the juxtaposition of the words ‘curse, bless’ to show how he longs for a reaction from his, presumably passed father. This creates a mood of sympathy for him. He misses his father so much that anything, whether good or bad, he would take to feel or hear his father. This perhaps further explains his ethos: he felt that his father’s life was not lived to the full, or he died in vain. The reader finds it easier to agree with this somewhat controversial ethos once they can understand the reasoning behind it.

The repetition at the end of every other 3-line verse of the poem of ‘rage, rage against the dying of the light.’ Creates a repetitive outpouring of negative emotion, that helps to bring forth the poet’s opinion however it does not quite match with the figurative, gentleness of the rest of the poem. Similarly, the imperative in the title, also repeated also at the end lines of verses ‘Do not go gentle into that good night’ almost juxtaposes itself; as its being firm with ‘do not’ but gentle with the word ‘gently’. I think this effects the way the ethos is put across, it makes it hard to relate with as you aren’t entirely sure what exactly mood and feeling writer is trying to convey.


You're welcome :bigsmile:
THANKYOUUU
i did my unseen today and i think it went well
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cytoplasm420
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#7
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(Original post by Kundana Amudala)
This is something my English teacher gave us ... hope this helps!
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thankssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss brooooooooooooooooooooseph
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Kundana Amudala
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(Original post by cytoplasm420)
thankssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss brooooooooooooooooooooseph
You're welcome!!
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