t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
Hello!
I am in year 12 and considering to apply to either biomedicine or pharmacology.
I'm stuck on my personal statement draft because I want it to flow rather than sound like a list and reflect better on my experiences.
Any tips or advice to improve a personal statement?
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
Its okay for it to sound like a bit of a list at first - mine definitely did this time last year. Its also okay if you go massively over the word limit at first. You know already you have to reflect on your experiences which is great and doing that is going to make it seem like less of a list. One structure you could use is starting with why you want to do the degree and the experience/ thing that made you realise you want to do the degree (its okay that you're not set on the exact yet), for me it was about my work experience. I then did a paragraph linking my A-levels to skills. I assume you do biology and chemistry so there's lots of things you can talk about.

biology
  1. synoptic essay (my teacher introduced us to them early on but some people don't move on to essay writing until year 2 - don't include it if you haven't done it)
  2. practicals (i know with COVID you might not have done many)
  3. topics you have enjoyed that link to the degree
chemistry
  1. practicals and topics that link to the degree (again)
  2. analytical approach to task
  3. explaining complex ideas
  4. maths skills

Then move on to what you've done that links to the degree (you have the summer to do more things obviously). For me this was webinars i watched and courses on future learn.

Then talk about your more broader experiences and link to skills like time management.

I'm definitely not an expert but i hope this helps
Last edited by Hellllpppp; 4 weeks ago
1
reply
therapeutics2021
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by t0897)
Hello!
I am in year 12 and considering to apply to either biomedicine or pharmacology.
I'm stuck on my personal statement draft because I want it to flow rather than sound like a list and reflect better on my experiences.
Any tips or advice to improve a personal statement?
Hi,

Firstly don't stress too much about your personal statement! as the person who sees this is generally the admin staff and they only glance over it. As long as you show your interest in the course without using clichés and demonstrate your suitability through work/educational experiences, you will fair well. You are trying to convince the university they want you, you are the right fit for your course, demonstrate any qualities you have that are applicable to the course.

Another great thing to do is to research future prospects, this shows you have thought long and hard and are committed to the course. I typically put this at the end and then if you're wanting to attend a russel group university, you could mention you would like the opportunity to contribute to your field in the future, through research (Russel groups are heavily research based unis so like to produce future academics).

Personally I would focus on the introduction to 'hook' the reader in, make it something you'd want to continue to read.

Also some universities provide guides on what they want to see in a personal statement, so try to look on the universities you may want to attend.

I've written 3 successful personal statements for a BA (Hons) a PGCE and for a BSc (Hons).

Hope some of this will help!
2
reply
Watsion
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by t0897)
Hello!
I am in year 12 and considering to apply to either biomedicine or pharmacology.
I'm stuck on my personal statement draft because I want it to flow rather than sound like a list and reflect better on my experiences.
Any tips or advice to improve a personal statement?
Honestly although listing is best avoided, I don't think its too big of a deal if you are somewhat listing because there is a word limit that you are trying to fit as much into as possible so I think the unis will understand that.
That being said I would probably recommend making sure that everything that you have written is relevant. If you were able to take a couple of irrelevant things out then you might have more space to talk about the what you have done rather than just listing.
Also, when you talk about your experiences, discuss what you have learned and the skills you got from them. If you haven't done this already I think that it would really help to make your PS flow more.
This may be obvious but try not to state the obvious either You can use those words for explanations or other points.
I hope this helps!
0
reply
Interrobang
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
You want to talk about a few things in detail rather than gloss over a load of things. Focus on things you've done that relate to why you are interested in the subject (extra reading, watching online lectures etc.) and talk about why they were interesting
0
reply
t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by Hellllpppp)
Its okay for it to sound like a bit of a list at first - mine definitely did this time last year. Its also okay if you go massively over the word limit at first. You know already you have to reflect on your experiences which is great and doing that is going to make it seem like less of a list. One structure you could use is starting with why you want to do the degree and the experience/ thing that made you realise you want to do the degree (its okay that you're not set on the exact yet), for me it was about my work experience. I then did a paragraph linking my A-levels to skills. I assume you do biology and chemistry so there's lots of things you can talk about.

biology
  1. synoptic essay (my teacher introduced us to them early on but some people don't move on to essay writing until year 2 - don't include it if you haven't done it)
  2. practicals (i know with COVID you might not have done many)
  3. topics you have enjoyed that link to the degree
chemistry
  1. practicals and topics that link to the degree (again)
  2. analytical approach to task
  3. explaining complex ideas
  4. maths skills

Then move on to what you've done that links to the degree (you have the summer to do more things obviously). For me this was webinars i watched and courses on future learn.

Then talk about your more broader experiences and link to skills like time management.

I'm definitely not an expert but i hope this helps
Wow thank you! I will edit my draft for my personal statement with these in mind. I want to talk about a few topics I've been interested in and how they've led me to attend certain lectures or interact with experts in the field but I am not that good at articulating what I'm thinking, what you've said are useful though to make me think about how to expand on what I've written.
1
reply
t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by Interrobang)
You want to talk about a few things in detail rather than gloss over a load of things. Focus on things you've done that relate to why you are interested in the subject (extra reading, watching online lectures etc.) and talk about why they were interesting
I've read a few example statements, and some sound like they're exaggerating their interest. Should I reflect on my true feelings like something made me worried because of x and y and this led me to question whether
0
reply
t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by Watsion)
Honestly although listing is best avoided, I don't think its too big of a deal if you are somewhat listing because there is a word limit that you are trying to fit as much into as possible so I think the unis will understand that.
That being said I would probably recommend making sure that everything that you have written is relevant. If you were able to take a couple of irrelevant things out then you might have more space to talk about the what you have done rather than just listing.
Also, when you talk about your experiences, discuss what you have learned and the skills you got from them. If you haven't done this already I think that it would really help to make your PS flow more.
This may be obvious but try not to state the obvious either You can use those words for explanations or other points.
I hope this helps!
Thank you for your tips, I feel like some things I've written are irrelevant. For instance, with biomedicine I don't think some of the topics I've written about are linked to the course content. With modules, how do I check what topics come under it?
0
reply
t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by therapeutics2021)
Hi,

Firstly don't stress too much about your personal statement! as the person who sees this is generally the admin staff and they only glance over it. As long as you show your interest in the course without using clichés and demonstrate your suitability through work/educational experiences, you will fair well. You are trying to convince the university they want you, you are the right fit for your course, demonstrate any qualities you have that are applicable to the course.

Another great thing to do is to research future prospects, this shows you have thought long and hard and are committed to the course. I typically put this at the end and then if you're wanting to attend a russel group university, you could mention you would like the opportunity to contribute to your field in the future, through research (Russel groups are heavily research based unis so like to produce future academics).

Personally I would focus on the introduction to 'hook' the reader in, make it something you'd want to continue to read.

Also some universities provide guides on what they want to see in a personal statement, so try to look on the universities you may want to attend.

I've written 3 successful personal statements for a BA (Hons) a PGCE and for a BSc (Hons).

Hope some of this will help!
Thank you for your advice, I will take them into account. With the cliches what is a cliche when reading a personal statement, I've read a few and some sound overly exaggerated or not unique to the individual
0
reply
Watsion
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 4 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by t0897)
Thank you for your tips, I feel like some things I've written are irrelevant. For instance, with biomedicine I don't think some of the topics I've written about are linked to the course content. With modules, how do I check what topics come under it?
I would suggest going on universities websites to find out
0
reply
Interrobang
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 4 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by t0897)
I've read a few example statements, and some sound like they're exaggerating their interest. Should I reflect on my true feelings like something made me worried because of x and y and this led me to question whether
Why would something make you 'worried'? Focus on interest, rather than happy/sad etc.
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by t0897)
I've read a few example statements, and some sound like they're exaggerating their interest. Should I reflect on my true feelings like something made me worried because of x and y and this led me to question whether
Focus on the positives - not something something like “I thought I’d do this but I’m not going to get the grades” or “I’m picking this course because I can’t choose between x and y”
0
reply
Hellllpppp
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by t0897)
Thank you for your advice, I will take them into account. With the cliches what is a cliche when reading a personal statement, I've read a few and some sound overly exaggerated or not unique to the individual
The best example of a cliche I can think of is - ever since I was a child I’ve wanted to do x. Also avoid using quotes
1
reply
t0897
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by Interrobang)
Why would something make you 'worried'? Focus on interest, rather than happy/sad etc.
From a lecture about stem cells I was worried about the consequences of a procedure which made me go onto reading an article on how they have improved this procedure
0
reply
Interrobang
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report 4 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by t0897)
From a lecture about stem cells I was worried about the consequences of a procedure which made me go onto reading an article on how they have improved this procedure
Talk about just wanting to find out about the consequences and why that was interesting in that example
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should the school day be extended to help students catch up?

Yes (72)
31.17%
No (159)
68.83%

Watched Threads

View All