Which is better: a job or a business?

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wendy1298
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Which is better: a job or a business?
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HoldThisL
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idk, maybe if you did a rundown on the comparison between apples and oranges we'd be better prepared to answer your question

/s
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bianca596
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It depends on the individual. For some people, a job is better. For other people, a business is better. If you’re trying to choose which is right for you right now, then it depends on your personality, lifestyle, interests, goals, comfort level with risk, and so on.
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Mr T 999
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It depends on you as an individual and life goals.

If you feel comfortable working for someone being told what to do and working on someone else schedule and your risk adverse then a job is better.

If you hate being told what to do and want to work on your own terms and work schedules and have the freedom to do whatever you want and your willing to take risk then business is better for you.
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Kutie Karen
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Being your own boss is good but comes with risks. Working for someone else can also come with problems too. Depends on what you like and what is out there for you.
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EU Yakov
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what job, what business, lmao.
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username19412
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(Original post by wendy1298)
Which is better: a job or a business?
A job with a side business on the side. If the business blows up leave the job. That's what Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg did when they went to Harvard.
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Kutie Karen
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(Original post by username19412)
A job with a side business on the side. If the business blows up leave the job. That's what Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg did when they went to Harvard.
Good advice Might need a bit of juggling though..
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RedGiant
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(Original post by username19412)
A job with a side business on the side. If the business blows up leave the job. That's what Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg did when they went to Harvard.
Most businesses are not going to be the next Facebook or even offer a service or product that’s new, so this is highly unrealistic. Does a chip shop start as a business on the side? No. Nor do most successful businesses. Using two extreme and over glorified examples as part of one’s expectations is foolish.

If a business is to succeed, especially in a crowded market, it requires 60 hour weeks of work consistently put in plus funding, the right service/product, the right experience/knowledge and many other intangibles.

Do not start a business if you are not willing to dedicate your life (and all of your money) to it. And do not start a business if you don’t want to have to worry about going bankrupt and losing everything. Speak to any small business owner that has actually done it before you do anything.
Last edited by RedGiant; 2 months ago
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username19412
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(Original post by RedGiant)
Most businesses are not going to be the next Facebook or even offer a service or product that’s new, so this is useless and highly unrealistic advice. Does a chip shop start as a business on the side? No. Nor do most successful businesses. Using two extreme and over glorified examples as part of one’s expectations is foolish.

If a business is to succeed, especially in a crowded market, it requires 60 hour weeks of work consistently put in plus funding, the right service/product, the right experience/knowledge and many other intangibles.

Do not start a business if you are not willing to dedicate your life (and all of your money) to it. And do not start a business if you don’t want to have to worry about going bankrupt and losing everything. Speak to any small business owner that has actually done it before you do anything.
I didn't say the next business needs to be the next Facebook. I think you are overestimating what a business needs. Only a few skills are required. Plenty of people who have went to university have started a business on the side, whether that's YouTube or a proper business. Two examples out of many are Ali Abdaal or Elliot Choy (youtuber) if we're not looking at the big tech cofounders. Ali Abdaal is a millionaire and he has 6 side businesses while being a junior doctor. If that doesn't scream that anyone can start 1 business on the side while having a job I don't know what else will. Yes, there is a lot of competition now, but so long as the person does something they're passionate about and puts enough time in, it can be successful.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by username19412)
I didn't say the next business needs to be the next Facebook. I think you are overestimating what a business needs. Only a few skills are required. Plenty of people who have went to university have started a business on the side, whether that's YouTube or a proper business. Two examples out of many are Ali Abdaal or Elliot Choy (youtuber) if we're not looking at the big tech cofounders. Ali Abdaal is a millionaire and he has 6 side businesses while being a junior doctor. If that doesn't scream that anyone can start 1 business on the side while having a job I don't know what else will. Yes, there is a lot of competition now, but so long as the person does something they're passionate about and puts enough time in, it can be successful.
YouTube is not a realistic business venture, nor is any of it’s derivative income channels (e.g. affiliate marketing), unless you have many tens of thousands of subscribers. Building any sort of substantial following on any platform is difficult and takes a long time. Your idea of a “business” is highly unrealistic.
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username19412
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(Original post by RedGiant)
YouTube is not a realistic business venture, nor is any of it’s derivative income channels (e.g. affiliate marketing), unless you have many tens of thousands of subscribers. Building any sort of substantial following on any platform is difficult and takes a long time. Your idea of a “business” is highly unrealistic.
I didn't say Youtube was the be-all and end-all business. You seem to think the businesses people can open nowadays are only chip shops and restaurants. These are full-time businesses and therefore can't be called a side business. With the internet now being a thing, there are a lot of other businesses (which are less saturated) that people can start. The problem is often more to do with the person being lazy and not having a long-term commitment, for example leaving a business after one year because it didn't make any profits.
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cleveranimal56
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It depends. A business would definitely be better if it turned out to be a success. But unfortunately, there's a high chance of that failing. So I would suggest to take a job, save up a bit, and study the market for a while before even thinking about starting a business. High risk, high reward sort of thing.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by username19412)
I didn't say Youtube was the be-all and end-all business. You seem to think the businesses people can open nowadays are only chip shops and restaurants. These are full-time businesses and therefore can't be called a side business. With the internet now being a thing, there are a lot of other businesses (which are less saturated) that people can start. The problem is often more to do with the person being lazy and not having a long-term commitment, for example leaving a business after one year because it didn't make any profits.
Both examples you gave share a mutual prerequisite of having a large social media following (YouTube), which is not a realistic business venture. I gave one example of a “proper” (in your words) business that requires 60+ hours a week of dedication (contrary to what one might think); this doesn’t warrant your suggestion. Try having a “long-term commitment” for any serious business endeavour, with the intention of making any money that can support yourself, whilst also having a normal 40+ hour week job, household chores, a social life, regular financial commitments, hobbies and all other normal responsibilities. A YouTube channel can be a great hobby, and if it makes any money, great, but it just isn’t realistic for most; a serious business endeavour needs full time dedication.
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