AmithNandakumar
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I am good at computer science and engineering but bad at maths. Which high end Russell group uni courses are the most and least maths heavy?
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TasteLikeChicken
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I suspect most RG unis will be fairly mathsy, high end ones especially so. CS and engineering both use a fair bit of maths, so I am unsure how 'bad' you are?

I will be blunt, you won't get into a RG, especially high end, if you're bad at maths for CS.

If by being good at CS you mean good at programming, that doesn't mean you're good at CS. If by being good at engineering you mean you can build stuff, that doesn't mean you are good at engineering. Please give me examples on why you think you are good at these things.
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HoldThisL
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(Original post by TasteLikeChicken)
I will be blunt, you won't get into a RG, especially high end, if you're bad at maths for CS.
this isn't true and there are some rg cs courses that don't require maths, albeit only a few

but i wonder how @op can ascertain being good a cs/e without (applied) maths; fair enough if op only means pure maths

degree level computer science will be very different to A level though so be wary about courses you choose
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TasteLikeChicken
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(Original post by HoldThisL)
this isn't true and there are some rg cs courses that don't require maths, albeit only a few

but i wonder how @op can ascertain being good a cs/e without (applied) maths; fair enough if op only means pure maths

degree level computer science will be very different to A level though so be wary about courses you choose
High-end RGs certainly require maths, which is what OP is looking for.

But let's take Nottingham, a RG which doesn't require A-Level Maths to get in. You have to do two maths modules in the first year according to the website, one being discrete maths and the other being linear algebra/calculus. While it's not super advanced, it is definitely above A-Level, so if OP doesn't want to do maths at all, I recommend a non-RG course which focuses more on application rather than theory.
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AmithNandakumar
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(Original post by TasteLikeChicken)
I suspect most RG unis will be fairly mathsy, high end ones especially so. CS and engineering both use a fair bit of maths, so I am unsure how 'bad' you are?

I will be blunt, you won't get into a RG, especially high end, if you're bad at maths for CS.

If by being good at CS you mean good at programming, that doesn't mean you're good at CS. If by being good at engineering you mean you can build stuff, that doesn't mean you are good at engineering. Please give me examples on why you think you are good at these things.
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
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AmithNandakumar
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(Original post by TasteLikeChicken)
High-end RGs certainly require maths, which is what OP is looking for.

But let's take Nottingham, a RG which doesn't require A-Level Maths to get in. You have to do two maths modules in the first year according to the website, one being discrete maths and the other being linear algebra/calculus. While it's not super advanced, it is definitely above A-Level, so if OP doesn't want to do maths at all, I recommend a non-RG course which focuses more on application rather than theory.
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
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AmithNandakumar
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(Original post by HoldThisL)
this isn't true and there are some rg cs courses that don't require maths, albeit only a few

but i wonder how @op can ascertain being good a cs/e without (applied) maths; fair enough if op only means pure maths

degree level computer science will be very different to A level though so be wary about courses you choose
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by AmithNandakumar)
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
You can have multiple quotes in the same reply

(Original post by AmithNandakumar)
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
(Original post by AmithNandakumar)
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
like that
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TasteLikeChicken
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(Original post by AmithNandakumar)
not any courses void of maths, just those courses that has slightly less maths than other courses
Okay, but the 'high end Russell Group' unis are going to have the most maths. Even the other RG unis, such as Bristol, are pretty mathematical from what I've seen. My friend who went to KCL didn't do a lot of maths, so that's a good bet I suppose. Nottingham doesn't seem too maths heavy either, and I think Birmingham too. Those are all good RG unis, so maybe start with them.
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