Insatiable1-1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#1
Basically i know glycogen is broken down to give out energy in the body etc but during flight and fight mode a lot of it is broken down.
My question is how exactly does the parasympathetic function in order stop more glycogen being broken down and what happens if too much of it is broken down.
0
reply
macpatgh-Sheldon
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 months ago
#2
Ok it's the same person with the gluttonous appetite again lol! How much curry am I supposed to make?

Ok interesting Q, but you need to appreciate that each chemical/process/activity in the human body systems is controlled by multiple factors/mechanisms - hence, try to think laterally, in this instance NOT just about the autonomic nervous system.

Yes well done the nervous system does have a part to play in homeostasis, but so do hormones and other mechanisms, yeah?

So now, coming to your Q, GLYCOGEN DOES NOT PROVIDE ENERGY DIRECTLY - it is stored in the liver and in muscle, BUT NEEDS TO BE BROKEN DOWN INTO GLUCOSE, which then provides energy via the respiration process in the biochemistry of the mitochondrion [respiration]

The process of glycogen synthesis and the opposite [decomposition of glycogen] are controlled mainly bt the hormones insulin and glucagon - insulin promotes glycogenesis and inhibits glycogenolysis i.e. tends to reduce blood glucose levels, WHEREAS glucagon does the opposite i.e. increases blood glucose.

There are several other factors that influence the dynamic balance between synthesis and breakdown of glycogen e.g. the actions of the hormones that have an anti-insulin activity, namely adrenaline [secreted by the adrenal medulla], thyroxine [secreted by the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland on the anterior [front] aspect of the neck and growth hormone [secreted by the pituitary gland in the brain]. [ignore this [italic print] if you are doing A levels - the examiners will not know it]

So your task, before you dig into the curry I sent you [[s}yum{s/], is to work out what each of these three insulin antagonists will do to blood glucose levels! [actually I can see the smirk on your face already! - easy peasy lemon squeezy, isn't it?].

Other factors that will influence glucose/glycogen levels in the body are oc
--- how much carbohydrate is eaten by the student [esp if he/she is insatiable lol] as well as
--- the action of GLUT-2 in the kidneys, which should result in reabsorption of all glucose by the proximal tubule cells unless one has diabetes mellitus [now my turn to take revenge on you - so there!! - my turn to ask you haha! - what will these proximal tubule cells be rich in? Yes you are in the right lines...........................................
.........................................................................................................
........................................................ go on
................................they need energy for active transport to reabsorb NOT ONLY glucose but e,g, amino acids too, so they have numerous large WHAT?.................................................................
.............................................................................................................................
..............................................................................

CORRECT brilliant mitochondria oc [also have microvilli on their luminal surface - why???

Best,

M
Last edited by macpatgh-Sheldon; 2 months ago
2
reply
Insatiable1-1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#3
(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Ok it's the same person with the gluttonous appetite again lol! How much curry am I supposed to make?

Ok interesting Q, but you need to appreciate that each chemical/process/activity in the human body systems is controlled by multiple factors/mechanisms - hence, try to think laterally, in this instance NOT just about the autonomic nervous system.

Yes well done the nervous system does have a part to play in homeostasis, but so do hormones and other mechanisms, yeah?

So now, coming to your Q, GLYCOGEN DOES NOT PROVIDE ENERGY DIRECTLY - it is stored in the liver and in muscle, BUT NEEDS TO BE BROKEN DOWN INTO GLUCOSE, which then provides energy via the respiration process in the biochemistry of the mitochondrion [respiration]

The process of glycogen synthesis and the opposite [decomposition of glycogen] are controlled mainly bt the hormones insulin and glucagon - insulin promotes glycogenesis and inhibits glycogenolysis i.e. tends to reduce blood glucose levels, WHEREAS glucagon does the opposite i.e. increases blood glucose.

There are several other factors that influence the dynamic balance between synthesis and breakdown of glycogen e.g. the actions of the hormones that have an anti-insulin activity, namely adrenaline [secreted by the adrenal medulla], thyroxine [secreted by the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland on the anterior [front] aspect of the neck and growth hormone [secreted by the pituitary gland in the brain]. [ignore this [italic print] if you are doing A levels - the examiners will not know it]

So your task, before you dig into the curry I sent you [[s}yum{s/], is to work out what each of these three insulin antagonists will do to blood glucose levels! [actually I can see the smirk on your face already! - easy peasy lemon squeezy, isn't it?].

Other factors that will influence glucose/glycogen levels in the body are oc
--- how much carbohydrate is eaten by the student [esp if he/she is insatiable lol] as well as
--- the action of GLUT-2 in the kidneys, which should result in reabsorption of all glucose by the proximal tubule cells unless one has diabetes mellitus [now my turn to take revenge on you - so there!! - my turn to ask you haha! - what will these proximal tubule cells be rich in? Yes you are in the right lines...........................................
.........................................................................................................
........................................................ go on
................................they need energy for active transport to reabsorb NOT ONLY glucose but e,g, amino acids too, so they have numerous large WHAT?.................................................................
.............................................................................................................................
..............................................................................

CORRECT brilliant mitochondria oc [also have microvilli on their luminal surface - why???

Best,

M
Thank you so much haha!! appreciate the help.
Also I wasn't able to respond on message as i am a new user and TRS said I cannot message yet ....
0
reply
macpatgh-Sheldon
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 months ago
#4
(Original post by Insatiable1-1)
Thank you so much haha!! appreciate the help.
Also I wasn't able to respond on message as i am a new user and TRS said I cannot message yet ....
Once again happy to help!
DW - just quench your insatiability with a lot of milk - once you grow into a toddler from being a baby I am sure TSR will let you send PMs!

Have a lovely day!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How would you feel if uni students needed to be double vaccinated to start in Autumn?

I'd feel reassured about my own health (8)
15.69%
I'd feel reassured my learning may be less disrupted by isolations/lockdowns (11)
21.57%
I'd feel less anxious about being around large groups (4)
7.84%
I don't mind if others are vaccinated or not (7)
13.73%
I'm concerned it may disadvantage some students (4)
7.84%
I think it's an unfair expectation (16)
31.37%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (1)
1.96%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise