Studying medicine after finishing dentistry

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Dr.Lasar
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hey Everyone,

I was wondering if anyone have an idea about my condition, so basically, i am originally british, but i‘ve never lived in the uk. On 2016 i started dentistry in Germany, and i am about to get my bachelor degree soon. I decided i finally want to settle in the uk and go back to it, and start medicine after my BDS. I am not sure how long i am going to study, is it gonna be shorter than the usual duration for medicine? I guess it’s usually 5 years.. Because i am already a dentist? Is my german bachelor degree in dentistry be recognized and eventually i will be able to get to study medicine and not start from the very beginning ?




I will be very glad if someone is able to help me !
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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#2
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Hi there!

The positives first - I have no info on the dental school training in Germany, but I knew a number of dental students when I was a medical student here in UK [actually our hospital hockey team captain was one] and I know that the training in general medicine and surgery that dental students receive is admirable; it is more advanced than that taught to nurses [who oc see patients day in/day out], and far superior to that of pharmacy students, who have very little exposure to patients and to general pathology. Legally in UK, at least in theory, dentists can prescribe POM [prescription only medicines] drugs.

Having said that the highly detailed info taught to dentists stems from their need to be aware of e.g. the potential haemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant therapy and of haemophilia/Christmas disease; OR the risk of bacterial endocarditis from the bacteraemia created by dental treatment in patients with cardiac valve disease, etc.

In view of the above, at least the clinicians I know who are "doubly qualified" oral surgeons or maxillofacial surgeons EITHER:

--- had to do the full six years of medicine after studying dentistry

OR:

did medicine first then the full 4 1/2 years of dentistry.

Some of these actually hold MBBS, FRCS as well as BDS FDSRCS i.e. they are ultimate experts in oral surgery.

I would suggest that you locate a few people who have this "double qualification" to find out exactly where you stand. The fact that you did dentistry in Germany might mean that special conditions apply in your specific situation. You could contact the BMA in Tavistock Square, London not far from Euston station for further first-hand info.

Best of luck & be safe!

M.
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Spencer Wells
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#3
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#3
King's used to offer an accelerated 3 year MBBS degree for those with a BDS. They've now increased it to 4 years.

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/undergra...programme-mbbs
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Democracy
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#4
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Birmingham have a three year medical course (i.e. starting at year 2 of the GEP), though they might not accept an applicant who has only just graduated in dentistry:

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We offer approximately five places on a three-year training course for qualified Dentists who wish to pursue a career in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.


The following principles apply to selection for interview.


  • You must apply for Year 2 entry on the Graduate-entry course (A101), which must be indicated on the UCAS application.
  • We do not use UCAT or any other aptitude test
  • We would expect normally that you must have achieved MJDF or MFDS, though we recognise that COVID-19 has had an impact on the examinations for these qualifications. Our expectation is that you will gain either MJDF or MFDS by 31st July 2021
  • You must offer substantial evidence of clinical practice in the UK post-graduation. The impact of COVD-19 is expected to be a small proportion of your time as a registered dentist
  • It is necessary for you to demonstrate commitment to and understanding of a career in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, including evidence of academic engagement with the speciality (audits and/or publications)
  • International applicants can be considered
  • The number of places on this programme will depend on the availability of clinical placements



https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools...programme.aspx
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jzdzm
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#5
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You might be eligible for any of the 4 year graduate entry medicine courses - you would have to contact the universities to clarify if they would accept your degree, and if they would class you as a home or international student. Some courses don't take internationals, and obviously the fees are much higher.
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artful_lounger
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#6
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There are two possible routes; the 4 year graduate entry medicine programmes, which would be open to dental graduates (as well as graduates of other science degrees, and for some, of any degree), and 3 year accelerated programmes specifically designed for those planning to pursue training in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The latter I believe do expect you to be committed to that specific career path (rather than just wanting to change to medicine "quicker") and only have limited spaces available specifically for people pursuing that career as I understand. If you're not aiming for OMFS then you will probably be limited to the 4 year graduate entry medicine programmes, as well as the 5 year standard entry medicine programmes.

As advised by previous posters you should take into account any financial factors well in advance of applying, as even if you are classified as a UK/home fees student, there is limited funding for a second degree in medicine (or any subject) and so you will need to make appropriate preparations depending on which course(s) you are applying to. For 4 year GEM programmes you normally need to self-fund the first ~£3500 or so of the tuition fees as a home fees student.

International students have much higher fees, and the UK has quotas for how many international fee paying students can be taken on to medicine courses. As a result, it is much more competitive for international students applying to medicine in the UK as there are far fewer spaces (although UCLAN's course is only for international students I believe). Note also that GEM courses are more competitive than standard entry medicine here; I would imagine then applying to GEM as an international fees student would be doubly competitive.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 year ago
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