Phoebe34
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I'm currently towards the end of year 12 and will be going into second year after the summer holidays and I'm just dreading it. I'm not sure if anyone else feels the same but this first year of college has flown by and I still haven't figured out how to revise efficiently, and I also still feel so overwhelmed with the content. I'm studying politics, criminology and sociology and the content altogether is just a lot. I know most a level students will have the same problem.. my question Is how can I manage revision time and breaking down content? any advice is much appreciated (:
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username5173262
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Welcome, to Hell
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SB1234567890
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I bought a planner for year 13 so I could create daily to do lists and plan when I would focus on each subject, epq and anything uni related to ensure a balance of everything
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Phoebe34
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
Welcome, to Hell
feels like it !
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Arden University
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(Original post by Phoebe34)
I'm currently towards the end of year 12 and will be going into second year after the summer holidays and I'm just dreading it. I'm not sure if anyone else feels the same but this first year of college has flown by and I still haven't figured out how to revise efficiently, and I also still feel so overwhelmed with the content. I'm studying politics, criminology and sociology and the content altogether is just a lot. I know most a level students will have the same problem.. my question Is how can I manage revision time and breaking down content? any advice is much appreciated (:
@Phoebe34
Hi Phoebe, you sound really commited to your studies, if you fully apply yourself I am sure you will be fine.

I have a degree in Sociology and what I would recommend is getting to know the perspectives like functionalism, marxism, feminism, and interactionism really well; then you can apply them to a variety of different topics across the exams. I remember a book by Aldridge called 'Religion in the contemporary world' being particularly useful.

Concentrate on theory, the historical stuff about the background of Marx etc is fascinating, but it is the mechanics of the theories that will get you high marks.

People tend to take the research methods questions for granted and don't bother to revise for them, don't forget them!

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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