I am not going to be abled to complete my dream:(HELPPP

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username5695805
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I am doing My GSCE and I am getting 4 for science ,6 for maths and 4 english.I always wanted to go do medicine and my grades are horrible,I am really sturggling keeping up my grade.I did mocks and i was doing foundation and i got the highest moved up and when I did the higher paper I failed too get more then 10.I was revising alot all half-term hoping I would get good but i failed and it took a big troll on my mental health and I have to do on my gsce because if i fail it and i resit no uni is going to take me.I watched videos reread and did practice questions.NOTING WORKED.Do you have tips,pleases.
I am in yr10.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by lola023-)
I am doing My GSCE and I am getting 4 for science ,6 for maths and 4 english.I always wanted to go do medicine and my grades are horrible,I am really sturggling keeping up my grade.I did mocks and i was doing foundation and i got the highest moved up and when I did the higher paper I failed too get more then 10.I was revising alot all half-term hoping I would get good but i failed and it took a big troll on my mental health and I have to do on my gsce because if i fail it and i resit no uni is going to take me.I watched videos reread and did practice questions.NOTING WORKED.Do you have tips,pleases.
I am in yr10.
Sucks to be you. Barring an enormous turnaround in fortunes, I'm afraid it doesn't look likely. My super strong advice would be to take your strongest subjects as A-levels, regardless of what they are, and see how you go - maybe look at long term graduate medicine.

Really though, maybe revisit why you want to read medicine in the first place. Be absolutely honest with yourself and ask if there is other stuff you would be happy doing.
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Scienceisgood
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Honestly and I’m sorry to say this, medicine is likely not going to be an option. HOWEVER, nursing and/or biomedicine could be and then, you could enter through the graduate route with high enough of a classification AND experience in the job.

Will typically require a 2.1 minimum though.
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username5695805
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
Honestly and I’m sorry to say this, medicine is likely not going to be an option. HOWEVER, nursing and/or biomedicine could be and then, you could enter through the graduate route with high enough of a classification AND experience in the job.

Will typically require a 2.1 minimum though.
What if i bring my science grades to a 7 and maths to a 7 and english 6
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username5695805
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(Original post by Trinculo)
Sucks to be you. Barring an enormous turnaround in fortunes, I'm afraid it doesn't look likely. My super strong advice would be to take your strongest subjects as A-levels, regardless of what they are, and see how you go - maybe look at long term graduate medicine.

Really though, maybe revisit why you want to read medicine in the first place. Be absolutely honest with yourself and ask if there is other stuff you would be happy doing.
How much grades do i have to go up
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artful_lounger
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Not all medical schools put that much emphasis on GCSEs, and some (e.g. Cambridge) have no GCSE requirements either. Many medical schools (possibly most) consider GCSE resits, which are not such a big deal as A-level resits, and several even consider A-level resits anyway.

The limiting factor is more going to be whether your school/6th form will allow you to take the requisite science subjects with those GCSEs or not. Do bear in mind that the A-levels in sciences (and maths, although that isn't required by any means) build on the GCSE knowledge, so if you are struggling with the GCSE science content that might indicate you would struggle with A-level science content (and possible the preclinical content of a medical degree).
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username5695805
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Not all medical schools put that much emphasis on GCSEs, and some (e.g. Cambridge) have no GCSE requirements either. Many medical schools (possibly most) consider GCSE resits, which are not such a big deal as A-level resits, and several even consider A-level resits anyway.

The limiting factor is more going to be whether your school/6th form will allow you to take the requisite science subjects with those GCSEs or not. Do bear in mind that the A-levels in sciences (and maths, although that isn't required by any means) build on the GCSE knowledge, so if you are struggling with the GCSE science content that might indicate you would struggle with A-level science content (and possible the preclinical content of a medical degree).
Thank you,i am trying to undesrstand the content
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ArtisticScreech
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My advice would be to try different revision techniques (spaced repetition and active recall especially - use apps like Anki and Quizlet) to work out which techniques work best for you (I would also recommend Seneca, and a personal tutor if you/your family can afford tuition). If your grades don't improve significantly, you can apply to graduate entry medicine but it is worth bearing in mind that undergrad entry would be less competitive so any steps you can take now to make undergrad entry possible would be worthwhile.
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username5695805
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(Original post by ArtisticScreech)
My advice would be to try different revision techniques (spaced repetition and active recall especially - use apps like Anki and Quizlet) to work out which techniques work best for you (I would also recommend Seneca, and a personal tutor if you/your family can afford tuition). If your grades don't improve significantly, you can apply to graduate entry medicine but it is worth bearing in mind that undergrad entry would be less competitive so any steps you can take now to make undergrad entry possible would be worthwhile.
Thank you,i am revising 3 hours a day and will will try that rechnique.
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Trinculo
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(Original post by lola023-)
What if i bring my science grades to a 7 and maths to a 7 and english 6
That’ll probably do it.

Thing is you don’t want to have a nightmare on your a levels tho
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redmeercat
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There are lots of things that help with revision. Personally, I found that finding the right revision methods at A level took me from a D to an A*, so anything's possible! It's all about knowing yourself and knowing how and when to revise:

when:
- Learn when you focus best. Some people are morning people, some people are evening people. Either way, you should do most of your revision at the time of day when you're most focused. For me, that's the morning so I prefer to get up early and revise in the morning, a bit in the afternoon and then have the whole evening off.
- Have a day every week off. Rest is important for your mental health and for your ability to remember things.

where:
- Different people work best in different places. I'm doing first year uni exams atm and I find that i work better somewhere that's not my bedroom and where there's a bit of background noise, so I've basically taken up residence in the library/ the bar that's in my accomodation. That'll be a bit harder for you, but you might find it easier to work at the dining table or in the garden for example, rather than in your room. If you can, avoid revising in bed ever. It'll make it harder to sleep if you associate your bed with work.

how long:
- Better to do less high quality revision than more low quality revision.
- Don't aim to do the same amount every day. You'll feel more motivated on some days than others, so try to be realistic when you wake up everyday about how you're feeling and whether you're going to try to do more or less work on that particular day.

How:
High-intensity revision is revision that teaches you a lot in less time. This is more tiring and you'll be able to focus on it for shorter periods of time, so the pomodoro technique can be good for this.
methods:
- blurting - choose a specific topic (e.g. diffiusion) and set a timer for 5-10 mins. Write down anything at all you can remember about that topic on a piece of paper, as scruffily as you like. After the 10 mins, go through your notes and correct what you wrote down on the paper, and add any information you forgot. I sometimes like to do this at the beginning and end of a revision session.
- practice questions without notes - use a revision guide or online questions and write answers, then mark them using the mark scheme. Make sure to be strict with yourself when marking!
- Use flashcards to quiz yourself. Some people prefer to use flashcards with single facts, personally (and slightly controversially) I find it easier to have flashcards with a whole subtopic on that I have to talk about. With this method you just have to be careful that you get all the points on a card!

Medium intensity is revision that takes effort, but that you can focus on for longer.
- Explain a topic to someone else who doesn't understand it. If you can't explain the topic including all the keywords and equations, you don't know it well enough. This really helps me!
- Open-book practice questions -> mark them

Low intensity is revision that doesn't necessarily help you memorise stuff, but which helps you understand stuff. If you're having trouble with a particular concept, this will probably be the place to start.
- Making notes that make sense to your brain works. E.g. I like mindmaps, mindmaps help me understand ideas, and so if I'm having trouble with something, I'll start with that. You can use your class notes, but also add to them with info from youtube vids and BBC bitesize etc.

In every revision session, be clear as to whether you're trying to understand, memorise or practice a topic. That way, you'll know at the end whether or not you've succeeded.
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ecolier
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Not all medical schools put that much emphasis on GCSEs, and some (e.g. Cambridge) have no GCSE requirements either. Many medical schools (possibly most) consider GCSE resits, which are not such a big deal as A-level resits, and several even consider A-level resits anyway.

The limiting factor is more going to be whether your school/6th form will allow you to take the requisite science subjects with those GCSEs or not. Do bear in mind that the A-levels in sciences (and maths, although that isn't required by any means) build on the GCSE knowledge, so if you are struggling with the GCSE science content that might indicate you would struggle with A-level science content (and possible the preclinical content of a medical degree).
I agree - someone who is struggling with GCSE sciences... will they manage to get all As in A-Levels?

Cambridge medicine, while they officially have no GCSE requirements - their standard offer is A*A*A. I don't know if OP will be able to achieve that realistically.
We'll need to know if there's an underlying problem or a root cause to why they cannot get their grades up. Remember that medicine, while it's probably not the hardest course - it's still not easy and it can be academically demanding.

(Original post by Scienceisgood)
Honestly and I’m sorry to say this, medicine is likely not going to be an option. HOWEVER, nursing and/or biomedicine could be and then, you could enter through the graduate route with high enough of a classification AND experience in the job.

Will typically require a 2.1 minimum though.
As usual, I would never ever advise anyone to specifically aim for graduate entry medicine.

As you said OP will need a 2:1, which IMO may well be harder than getting A-Level grade As; not to mention that GEM tends to require much higher UCAT scores, or need applicants to excel in the GAMSAT.

If one can't get through to standard undergrad medicine, their difficulty is multiplied for graduate entry medicine so this route should never be recommended for those who can still do the former. GEM is designed for students who are already doing their degree, or graduates who have changed their mind after obtaining their degree.
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username5695805
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(Original post by redmeercat)
There are lots of things that help with revision. Personally, I found that finding the right revision methods at A level took me from a D to an A*, so anything's possible! It's all about knowing yourself and knowing how and when to revise:

when:
- Learn when you focus best. Some people are morning people, some people are evening people. Either way, you should do most of your revision at the time of day when you're most focused. For me, that's the morning so I prefer to get up early and revise in the morning, a bit in the afternoon and then have the whole evening off.
- Have a day every week off. Rest is important for your mental health and for your ability to remember things.

where:
- Different people work best in different places. I'm doing first year uni exams atm and I find that i work better somewhere that's not my bedroom and where there's a bit of background noise, so I've basically taken up residence in the library/ the bar that's in my accomodation. That'll be a bit harder for you, but you might find it easier to work at the dining table or in the garden for example, rather than in your room. If you can, avoid revising in bed ever. It'll make it harder to sleep if you associate your bed with work.

how long:
- Better to do less high quality revision than more low quality revision.
- Don't aim to do the same amount every day. You'll feel more motivated on some days than others, so try to be realistic when you wake up everyday about how you're feeling and whether you're going to try to do more or less work on that particular day.

How:
High-intensity revision is revision that teaches you a lot in less time. This is more tiring and you'll be able to focus on it for shorter periods of time, so the pomodoro technique can be good for this.
methods:
- blurting - choose a specific topic (e.g. diffiusion) and set a timer for 5-10 mins. Write down anything at all you can remember about that topic on a piece of paper, as scruffily as you like. After the 10 mins, go through your notes and correct what you wrote down on the paper, and add any information you forgot. I sometimes like to do this at the beginning and end of a revision session.
- practice questions without notes - use a revision guide or online questions and write answers, then mark them using the mark scheme. Make sure to be strict with yourself when marking!
- Use flashcards to quiz yourself. Some people prefer to use flashcards with single facts, personally (and slightly controversially) I find it easier to have flashcards with a whole subtopic on that I have to talk about. With this method you just have to be careful that you get all the points on a card!

Medium intensity is revision that takes effort, but that you can focus on for longer.
- Explain a topic to someone else who doesn't understand it. If you can't explain the topic including all the keywords and equations, you don't know it well enough. This really helps me!
- Open-book practice questions -> mark them

Low intensity is revision that doesn't necessarily help you memorise stuff, but which helps you understand stuff. If you're having trouble with a particular concept, this will probably be the place to start.
- Making notes that make sense to your brain works. E.g. I like mindmaps, mindmaps help me understand ideas, and so if I'm having trouble with something, I'll start with that. You can use your class notes, but also add to them with info from youtube vids and BBC bitesize etc.

In every revision session, be clear as to whether you're trying to understand, memorise or practice a topic. That way, you'll know at the end whether or not you've succeeded.
thank you!!!!
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