Msc in Statistics from BSc Economics

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Econowizmeister
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#1
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#1
I'm going into the second year of Economics BSc at Warwick and I've not done too well in first year (as in scraping the 40% due to laziness, but I'm going to apply for the msc after I've achieved the degree with a gap year between so hopefully it doesn't bite me in the arse).

I was wondering what the chances would be to get into a top MSc Statistics programme with a 1st in my degree (e.g. warwick's, UCL, oxford) ? The course is quite mathematical and the optional modules I intend to pick in the next two years will be very stats/maths heavy with econometrics, mathematical economics that has multivariable calc, etc. Would this be considered mathematical enough to be competitive for a stats MSc in a top uni?
Last edited by Econowizmeister; 11 months ago
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one_two_three
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#2
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#2
A first is always going to give a good chance of getting into a Masters programme. Oxford Stats is very competitive and it is a massive jump to go from 40% to 70%. I know that first year results don't count towards your degree but that is where you learn the skills that help with the jump from A level to degree. A gap year would only be beneficial (in terms of an application) if you are getting experience related to your degree - otherwise it won't help your application.

Instead of looking at a masters before second year I would focus on your workload because you won't be getting into a masters with 40% - and the jump from that to a first seems unlikely.
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Econowizmeister
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#3
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
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(Original post by one_two_three)
A first is always going to give a good chance of getting into a Masters programme. Oxford Stats is very competitive and it is a massive jump to go from 40% to 70%. I know that first year results don't count towards your degree but that is where you learn the skills that help with the jump from A level to degree. A gap year would only be beneficial (in terms of an application) if you are getting experience related to your degree - otherwise it won't help your application.

Instead of looking at a masters before second year I would focus on your workload because you won't be getting into a masters with 40% - and the jump from that to a first seems unlikely.
Workload and the work itself wasn't a problem, I was just uncharacteristically lazy because I developed an addiction to something (not drugs or anything) that made me waste a lot of time
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Econowizmeister
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#4
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#4
(Original post by one_two_three)
A first is always going to give a good chance of getting into a Masters programme. Oxford Stats is very competitive and it is a massive jump to go from 40% to 70%. I know that first year results don't count towards your degree but that is where you learn the skills that help with the jump from A level to degree. A gap year would only be beneficial (in terms of an application) if you are getting experience related to your degree - otherwise it won't help your application.

Instead of looking at a masters before second year I would focus on your workload because you won't be getting into a masters with 40% - and the jump from that to a first seems unlikely.
Moreso the aim of the question was to gauge whether the degree I'm doing is appropriate for applyinmf to msc stats
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one_two_three
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#5
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#5
As long as your degree has a sufficient amount of advanced mathematical content then you will be eligible to apply.

Whatever your reasoning, to get into a masters at a top university you will require at the minimum a high 2.1 - Oxbridge is a 1st (Oxford say high 2.1 to apply but are honest and say everyone has a first).

It's not just about the laziness - a natural 1st class student can typically not put a great deal of effort into an assignment and come out with a low 2.2. If you haven't studied at degree level before then you don't know whether you are able to achieve a 1st if you have not yet achieved a 1st in your modules. Particularly within Maths based courses - A levels are a poor predictor of university ability. If everyone who achieved top A level grades was capable of achieving a 1st then the top universities would graduate far more 1sts.

Definitely focus on your studies more before you look at a masters and make sure you have the support in place necessary to help you with your addiction. The learning curve is going to be extremely steep to be getting high 2.1s and 1sts (but it's possible).
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Econowizmeister
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#6
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#6
(Original post by one_two_three)
As long as your degree has a sufficient amount of advanced mathematical content then you will be eligible to apply.

Whatever your reasoning, to get into a masters at a top university you will require at the minimum a high 2.1 - Oxbridge is a 1st (Oxford say high 2.1 to apply but are honest and say everyone has a first).

It's not just about the laziness - a natural 1st class student can typically not put a great deal of effort into an assignment and come out with a low 2.2. If you haven't studied at degree level before then you don't know whether you are able to achieve a 1st if you have not yet achieved a 1st in your modules. Particularly within Maths based courses - A levels are a poor predictor of university ability. If everyone who achieved top A level grades was capable of achieving a 1st then the top universities would graduate far more 1sts.

Definitely focus on your studies more before you look at a masters and make sure you have the support in place necessary to help you with your addiction. The learning curve is going to be extremely steep to be getting high 2.1s and 1sts (but it's possible).
i got a low 2:2 in micro macro and statistics but the essay modules let me down because I'm bad at writing essays. Im deliberately picking all the maths modules next 2 years. Also some modules had seminar attendance as 10% of the grade and I didn't show up which hjarmed me
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one_two_three
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#7
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#7
Ok - well you definitely need to work on your essay writing skills then. You can sometimes avoid a dissertation at undergrad but a masters is going to include it and it is never an insignificant weighting. A lot of universities will have essay skills workshops and similar run through support services or the library. It would be well worth attending some of these just to help you with that aspect when you get to masters and if you have an essays at undergrad. You are potentially losing out on easy marks and it could be down to a couple of technique changes.
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ewchiew
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#8
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#8
Hi,
I just share my opinion with you based on my past experiences. Hopefully, it able to helps you to make the right decision.

1) Strong fundamental Mathematical and statistical knowledge is required if you wish to choose MSc Statistics. Not only multivariable calculus, but you also need to know some Linear Algebra, Multivariable Probability, and some Applied Statistics Methods, such as ANOVA, Regression, Time Series, Multivariate Analysis, etc. I think these methods are most likely will be covered in your Econometrics courses.

2) If you wish to take MSc Statistics, the statistics courses that are covered are not only in economics but also in wider fields. Unless if you are taking the MSc Statistics that is offered under the Faculty of Economics. In econometrics, the statistical methods that you learned might be more applied, but in Statistics, it might be more theoretical and you will be taught to solve the statistical problems in more mathematical ways. These all depend on the university's policies. Different universities might have different policies in offering the courses.

3) Are you going to choose your MSc Statistics in coursework mode or research mode? If coursework mode, try to make research, see what courses are offered for that MSc program. If you are able to discover the course description, it would be better so that you will know what topics are the course is going to covered.

4) If you have friends that studied in BSc Statistics or Mathematics, you may ask them what courses that they have studied in their program. You may also borrow their study notes and discover yourself or can seek help from them. It is better to make proper preparation before you enroll in the MSc. I have also done the same before I enrolled in my MSc Statistics and it helps me a lot.

I am just sharing based on my past experiences. You may get advice from your lecturers, seniors, or see whether there are other experiences people reply to this post so that you can refer to their advice as well.

Thank you.
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