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Football books. watch

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    I think I'll probably get a slightly better response here than if I posted in the Literature forum. Anyway, recently I've been tearing my way through football books like The Miracle of Castel di Sangro and A Season with Verona. There's nothing like a bit of crazy calcio to keep you up and happy, and I wholeheartedly recommend these books to anyone who hasn't read them. The former is about a team from a tiny town in the Italian mountains with a population of about 5,000 who somehow managed to gain promotion to Serie B. To put this into perspective, it's probably a little like Halesworth Town getting to the Championship. The story of the season is told by an American football fan who seems to be a bit obsessive about Italian football. A Season with Verona is about an English Oxbridge graduate who emigrated to Italy and became a fan of Hellas Verona, renowned for their racism. He talks about that a lot.

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knew of similar things I could read?
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    Grab yourself a copy of Futebol: The Brazilian Way of Life by Alex Bellos, brilliant read!
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    Is the first one based on A.C Chievo - sound like it ?

    I use to follow Italien Footie; there story was a bit like that; plus they share their staduim with Hellas Verona.
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    (Original post by Rafa)
    Grab yourself a copy of Futebol: The Brazilian Way of Life by Alex Bellos, brilliant read!
    Ooh, I think I have that back in London actually! I have no idea why I've never gotten around to opening it. :s:

    (Original post by g_star_raw_1989)
    Is the first one based on A.C Chievo - sound like it ?
    No, it's a true story.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)

    No, it's a true story.
    That's what I meant.

    A team called Chievo, they really play in Serie A now. The way you described the first book sounded like the story of that team.

    Plus, they really share a staduim with Hellas Verona.
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    (Original post by g_star_raw_1989)
    That's what I meant.

    A team called Chievo, they really play in Serie A now. The way you described the first book sounded like the story of that team.

    Plus, they really share a staduim with Hellas Verona.
    Oh. No, Verona's a massive city in the north of Italy. Castel di Sangro only made it as far as Serie B; they're back down in the amateur leagues now.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    Oh. No, Verona's a massive city in the north of Italy. Castel di Sangro only made it as far as Serie B; they're back down in the amateur leagues now.
    Oh ok, cool.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    Castel di Sangro only made it as far as Serie B; they're back down in the amateur leagues now.
    CARLOOOOO, CARLOOOOO, CARLOOOO, CARLOOOO, CARLOOOOOO.

    I HEARTS Cudicini. So much cooler than Cech.
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    (Original post by Grape190190)
    CARLOOOOO, CARLOOOOO, CARLOOOO, CARLOOOO, CARLOOOOOO.

    I HEARTS Cudicini. So much cooler than Cech.
    I was pretty shocked when I read that you'd signed him from them! They seem to have a habit of creating amazing keepers. At least, they had one (Massimo Lotti) in the book and I'm not sure what happened to him. I shall check. Hmm, he's with Venezia now, nothing that exciting.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    I was pretty shocked when I read that you'd signed him from them! They seem to have a habit of creating amazing keepers. At least, they had one (Massimo Lotti) in the book and I'm not sure what happened to him. I shall check. Hmm, he's with Venezia now, nothing that exciting.
    Well, Wikipedia says he only played 14 times for them - but then, until he came to Chelsea, he was one of those career reserve goalkeepers they have in Italy.

    And, er, I guess he is again now. :'(

    EDIT: Ah, apparently he was injured while there.
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    (Original post by Grape190190)
    Well, Wikipedia says he only played 14 times for them - but then, until he came to Chelsea, he was one of those career reserve goalkeepers they have in Italy.

    And, er, I guess he is again now. :'(

    EDIT: Ah, apparently he was injured while there.
    Aye, that's where I read it. Bit confused as to how Chelsea picked him up from them but whatever, he was a classy purchase and CdS probably benefited from it too overall.

    Shame, that.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    Ooh, I think I have that back in London actually! I have no idea why I've never gotten around to opening it. :s:
    It's a good read dude, make sure you get round to reading it, you won't be disappointed
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    I only usually get the Rothmans year book and the odd autobiography.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    I think I'll probably get a slightly better response here than if I posted in the Literature forum. Anyway, recently I've been tearing my way through football books like The Miracle of Castel di Sangro and A Season with Verona. There's nothing like a bit of crazy calcio to keep you up and happy, and I wholeheartedly recommend these books to anyone who hasn't read them. The former is about a team from a tiny town in the Italian mountains with a population of about 5,000 who somehow managed to gain promotion to Serie B. To put this into perspective, it's probably a little like Halesworth Town getting to the Championship. The story of the season is told by an American football fan who seems to be a bit obsessive about Italian football. A Season with Verona is about an English Oxbridge graduate who emigrated to Italy and became a fan of Hellas Verona, renowned for their racism. He talks about that a lot.

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knew of similar things I could read?
    Sounds like an excellent read. If I didn't have so much uni stuff to read (not to mention so little money buying so much uni stuff that I have to read), then I'd definitely try and get hold of that. I'll see if anyone on the exchange site I use has it and is willing to swap it for one of my classics!

    Anyway, the first thing I'll say about football literature is stay away from autobiographies like the plague, especially the more modern day ones :mad:

    Perhaps the football book I care to recall most fondly, and the only one that's even remotely similar to the one you've read, is How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the F.A.Cup. I read it quite a few years ago, but I still remember quite a bit of it. Narrative wise, it's similar to yours; the rise of a lowly group of village inhabitants to relative stardom, but how far do they go? In terms of the prose, however, I think it'll be far, far better than the one you read. It's so wonderful to read, even if it does begin to sound a bit self-indulgent at times. The author, J.L.Carr, studied with one of my old professors so perhaps I'm a tad biased :p:

    I'd definitely recommend it, though.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    Aye, that's where I read it. Bit confused as to how Chelsea picked him up from them but whatever, he was a classy purchase and CdS probably benefited from it too overall.
    I read an article explaining it a few years back: Claudio knew about him, and decided we needed a decent reserve keeper at a low-low prices.

    Then he turned out to be a legend.

    Interesting fact: he's a plane geek.
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    (Original post by Rock Fan)
    .
    Yeah, see, lists of stats and a self-absorbed account of a career don't interest me so much. An outsider's perspective on a season is more interesting, and it's the only way I'm going to get properly involved in the happenings of a team I don't support, like CdS or Hellas.
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    (Original post by Ascient)
    Sounds like an excellent read. If I didn't have so much uni stuff to read (not to mention so little money buying so much uni stuff that I have to read), then I'd definitely try and get hold of that. I'll see if anyone on the exchange site I use has it and is willing to swap it for one of my classics!

    Anyway, the first thing I'll say about football literature is stay away from autobiographies like the plague, especially the more modern day ones :mad:

    Perhaps the football book I care to recall most fondly, and the only one that's even remotely similar to the one you've read, is How Steeple Sinderby Wanderers Won the F.A.Cup. I read it quite a few years ago, but I still remember quite a bit of it. Narrative wise, it's similar to yours; the rise of a lowly group of village inhabitants to relative stardom, but how far do they go? In terms of the prose, however, I think it'll be far, far better than the one you read. It's so wonderful to read, even if it does begin to sound a bit self-indulgent at times. The author, J.L.Carr, studied with one of my old professors so perhaps I'm a tad biased :p:

    I'd definitely recommend it, though.
    If you were in Manchester I'd lend it to you. I think it's definitely worth the £6.99 or so I paid for it, and it's probably the first football book I recommend to anyone who asks.

    Perhaps it is, considering he's probably a writer rather than someone who just dabbles in bits of American journalism before getting swept up in WC '94, then rushing about Italy for the sake of calcio. But still, much as I love fiction, I don't think it'll feel the same knowing that there's not actually a Signor Rezza out there, or finding out about real tales of corruption and match fixing. I'll look out for it too though, cheers.

    Overground's recommended me a book called 'Up Pompey' so I'll pick that up too at some point.

    (Original post by grape190190)
    I read an article explaining it a few years back: Claudio knew about him, and decided we needed a decent reserve keeper at a low-low prices.

    Then he turned out to be a legend.

    Interesting fact: he's a plane geek.
    Good old Claudio. I bet Jose wouldn't have known anyone like that.
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    If you were in Manchester I'd lend it to you. I think it's definitely worth the £6.99 or so I paid for it, and it's probably the first football book I recommend to anyone who asks.

    Perhaps it is, considering he's probably a writer rather than someone who just dabbles in bits of American journalism before getting swept up in WC '94, then rushing about Italy for the sake of calcio. But still, much as I love fiction, I don't think it'll feel the same knowing that there's not actually a Signor Rezza out there, or finding out about real tales of corruption and match fixing. I'll look out for it too though, cheers.

    Overground's recommended me a book called 'Up Pompey' so I'll pick that up too at some point.
    Well that's good of you to want to help. If I get a break from uni, I'll definitely try and get it now.

    Have fun reading!
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    (Original post by Jangrafess)
    Good old Claudio. I bet Jose wouldn't have known anyone like that.
    Jose bought Hilario!
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    (Original post by Panthalic)
    Jose bought Hilario!
    Do you think he's going to be the legend Carlo was/is?
 
 
 
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