Chemistry help PLEASE ASAP

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Oosousername
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“ the move energy levels of electrons an atom has , the weaker the covalent bonds it forms” is it bc the more energy levels it has means less electrons are being shared as it needs fewer electrons to have a full outer shell therefore there are less covalent bonds to break; less energy is needed and boiling/melting points are lower as theres few bonds to break ?
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Hellllpppp
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I think you’ve misunderstood what energy levels are - they’re just the shells. If they’re are more shells how do you think that affects the covalent bond?
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Oosousername
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(Original post by Hellllpppp)
I think you’ve misunderstood what energy levels are - they’re just the shells. If they’re are more shells how do you think that affects the covalent bond?
If there’s more shells then theres less covalent bonds as its more likely the outershell is full?
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Hellllpppp
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(Original post by Oosousername)
If there’s more shells then theres less covalent bonds as its more likely the outershell is full?
It’s not about the number of covalent bonds as it says the covalent bonds formed are weaker, think about where the bond is if there are more shells.
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TheKira
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(Original post by Oosousername)
“ the move energy levels of electrons an atom has , the weaker the covalent bonds it forms” is it bc the more energy levels it has means less electrons are being shared as it needs fewer electrons to have a full outer shell therefore there are less covalent bonds to break; less energy is needed and boiling/melting points are lower as theres few bonds to break ?
The strength of a covalent bond is linked to the length of a covalent bond.
More shells or energy levels mean that the outer shell electrons are further away from the nucleus. Outer shell electrons are involved in covalent bonding.

If the number of shells increases then the distance between the outer shell electrons (bonding electrons) and the nucleus also increases. There's a weaker electrostatic force of attraction between the bonding electrons and the positive attraction of the nuclei and thus a weaker covalent bond.
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Oosousername
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(Original post by Hellllpppp)
It’s not about the number of covalent bonds as it says the covalent bonds formed are weaker, think about where the bond is if there are more shells.
Ohhh I think I get it now, so the nuclei is positive and the electrons are negative, which leads to electrostatic forces between the two, if the outer shells increase the electrons are farer away from the nuclei, this results in a weaker electrostatic bond and therefore a weaker covalent bond? It kind of makes sense but I thought electrostatic forces were in ionic bonds, and that what held covalent bonds together was the sharing of electrons the covalent bond ?
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Oosousername
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(Original post by TheKira)
The strength of a covalent bond is linked to the length of a covalent bond.
More shells or energy levels mean that the outer shell electrons are further away from the nucleus. Outer shell electrons are involved in covalent bonding.

If the number of shells increases then the distance between the outer shell electrons (bonding electrons) and the nucleus also increases. There's a weaker electrostatic force of attraction between the bonding electrons and the positive attraction of the nuclei and thus a weaker covalent bond.
Right okay, I think I kind of get it, that helps a bit thank you
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Hellllpppp
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(Original post by Oosousername)
Ohhh I think I get it now, so the nuclei is positive and the electrons are negative, which leads to electrostatic forces between the two, if the outer shells increase the electrons are farer away from the nuclei, this results in a weaker electrostatic bond and therefore a weaker covalent bond? It kind of makes sense but I thought electrostatic forces were in ionic bonds, and that what held covalent bonds together was the sharing of electrons the covalent bond ?
Yeah an electrostatic force is just the name for a force between a positive and negative charge. Ionic bonds involve electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. In covalent bonds there’s a shared pair of electrons and the attraction to the nuclei of the two molecules that share the electrons is what keeps the molecules together.
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Oosousername
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(Original post by Hellllpppp)
Yeah an electrostatic force is just the name for a force between a positive and negative charge. Ionic bonds involve electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. In covalent bonds there’s a shared pair of electrons and the attraction to the nuclei of the two molecules that share the electrons is what keeps the molecules together.
But covalent bonds can’t conduct electricity as the electrons have no charge, however wouldnt the electrostatic forces give them a change?
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Hellllpppp
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(Original post by Oosousername)
But covalent bonds can’t conduct electricity as the electrons have no charge, however wouldnt the electrostatic forces give them a change?
Electrons all have a negative charge the reason it doesn’t conduct electricity is because the electrons aren’t free to flow in covalent bonds. In metals the electrons are delocalised so can carry charge and when molton or dissolved in water ionic compounds conduct electricity as the ions can flow.
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Oosousername
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(Original post by Hellllpppp)
Electrons all have a negative charge the reason it doesn’t conduct electricity is because the electrons aren’t free to flow in covalent bonds. In metals the electrons are delocalised so can carry charge and when molton or dissolved in water ionic compounds conduct electricity as the ions can flow.
but even when a covalent bond is molten it cannot conduct electricity ,but in that state aren’t the electrons delocalised ?I had read somewhere that covalent bonds dont conduct electricity bc they have no charge, but that can’t be possible bc of the electrostatic forces and like you said electrons always have a - charge
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Hellllpppp
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(Original post by Oosousername)
but even when a covalent bond is molten it cannot conduct electricity ,but in that state aren’t the electrons delocalised ?I had read somewhere that covalent bonds dont conduct electricity bc they have no charge, but that can’t be possible bc of the electrostatic forces and like you said electrons always have a - charge
The electrons in a covalent bond aren’t delocalised even when the molecule is in liquid form so they can not carry charge and the atoms have no overall charge. When a simple covalent molecule melts/boils only the weak intermolecular forces break the strong covalent bond (shared pair of electrons) stay intact.

There is a exception to this which is graphite. Carbon can form 4 covalent bonds but in graphite only forms 3 do there are delocalised electrons which can carry charge.
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