SaintSaint
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Im really stressing as I need to pick my firm and insurance choices tomorrow. For one of the picks i’ve narrowed it down to warwick and UCL as they are quite similar in terms of course level. My offer is for physics.

However obviously, there would be more to do in London and may just be a more fun place to live. However, As someone who is still on the fence with physics, I have thought of changing to Maths and Physics to give me some variety and reassures me that I have maths as another subject in case i dislike one. However, UCL wouldn’t let me switch to the Maths and Physics course as they require further maths (which i havent done). So to go to London, with UCL, I would have to commit to just physics. I find astrophysics and cosmology fascinating but I have found other areas of physics difficult or unenjoyable in the past. My A-Level grade should be quite good though as I revised very hard for all my subjects and did very well in my mini assessments. I also thought I would have perhaps enjoyed the Astrophysics module at A-Level more than I actually did. But not much of it was covered in our assessments so it has been a while since i’ve done it, and it wasnt the largest of modules either. However, again I am unsure how I would find it at university and hence the ability to have maths as a back up is nice. Warwick would allow me to switch to the MathPhys course, and it is the only uni that I actually managed to visit. I did wnjpy the campus but it was isolated and didnt seem like there was much going on, especially compared to London. Plus the campus isn’t huge, but its definitely not that small either.

What do you guys think?
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artful_lounger
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Are you sure Warwick would let you swap to the joint honours course? My understanding is that switching into the maths programmes is difficult. _gcx might know if it's more common for the physics & maths course. Note also degree level maths (i.e. the kind done in a maths degree) is very different to the type of maths done at A-level. The kinds of maths you'll do in a physics degree will be much more similar to the mathematical methods of A-level Maths.

In terms of physics at degree level in general, it's more similar to the kinds of things you've done in A-level Maths than A-level Physics generally. Sinnoh might be able to advise more on that. The point being, you might find some topics you didn't like at A-level you like more when you do it at degree level, since it will usually be more mathematically sophisticated and you'll actually be using calculus to solve problems instead of plugging and chugging into algebraic equations like in A-level.
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_gcx
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Worth pointing out that for the most part (there are a handful of exceptions) you will be doing the exact same modules as the students just doing Maths, which will have an impact on the style.
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Are you sure Warwick would let you swap to the joint honours course? My understanding is that switching into the maths programmes is difficult. _gcx might know if it's more common for the physics & maths course. Note also degree level maths (i.e. the kind done in a maths degree) is very different to the type of maths done at A-level. The kinds of maths you'll do in a physics degree will be much more similar to the mathematical methods of A-level Maths.

In terms of physics at degree level in general, it's more similar to the kinds of things you've done in A-level Maths than A-level Physics generally. Sinnoh might be able to advise more on that. The point being, you might find some topics you didn't like at A-level you like more when you do it at degree level, since it will usually be more mathematically sophisticated and you'll actually be using calculus to solve problems instead of plugging and chugging into algebraic equations like in A-level.
The difficulty is mainly into the maths department. The most popular joint degrees (exceptions are maths & philosophy and maths & economics/business, the latter two hardly exist) are administered by the non-maths department - maths and physics is administered in physics and the transfer seems a formality. (as it is within the stats department between say mathstat and MORSE given the right grades/modules) I know of someone who could switch from physics to maths and physics early on. (they were put onto physics pending a remark which was successful) I'd imagine if the OP asks earlyish they'll be fine. [I had read the OP to mean they had already sought advice and been told yes to a transfer but I might be wrong]

Also once they are on the maths & physics course I don't know how easy it would be for them to switch back if they changed their mind. There are no labs on maths and physics until the third year I think. (also something for the OP to consider) A switch from physics to maths & physics on the other hand would be impossible without restarting the degree. (I know someone who didn't have to but he was very much exceptional and took second year maths modules early to prove this) But I don't know a lot about that course.
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Are you sure Warwick would let you swap to the joint honours course? My understanding is that switching into the maths programmes is difficult. _gcx might know if it's more common for the physics & maths course. Note also degree level maths (i.e. the kind done in a maths degree) is very different to the type of maths done at A-level. The kinds of maths you'll do in a physics degree will be much more similar to the mathematical methods of A-level Maths.

In terms of physics at degree level in general, it's more similar to the kinds of things you've done in A-level Maths than A-level Physics generally. Sinnoh might be able to advise more on that. The point being, you might find some topics you didn't like at A-level you like more when you do it at degree level, since it will usually be more mathematically sophisticated and you'll actually be using calculus to solve problems instead of plugging and chugging into algebraic equations like in A-level.
I have been in contact with the head of physics at Warwick and he has said that the change is definitely possible but aslong as its done a few weeks before results day, a change afterwards is still possible but less likely. My thought process being I would change before the start of the course, experience both subjects and possibly continue with a joint honours if i enjoyed it, or it is possible to continue with single honours of your choosing after the first year.

Thanks for that insight into the degrees, do you think it would be worth contacting those people you mentioned? or would they be able to see this thread. The reason why It is such a difficult choice is because I know how different the subjects can be from A-level, and so it almost feels like i haven’t actually studied them before.
Do you have any other thoughts?
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by _gcx)
Worth pointing out that for the most part (there are a handful of exceptions) you will be doing the exact same modules as the students just doing Maths, which will have an impact on the style.

The difficulty is mainly into the maths department. The most popular joint degrees (exceptions are maths & philosophy and maths & economics/business, the latter two hardly exist) are administered by the non-maths department - maths and physics is administered in physics and the transfer seems a formality. (as it is within the stats department between say mathstat and MORSE given the right grades/modules) I know of someone who could switch from physics to maths and physics early on. (they were put onto physics pending a remark which was successful) I'd imagine if the OP asks earlyish they'll be fine. [I had read the OP to mean they had already sought advice and been told yes to a transfer but I might be wrong]

Also once they are on the maths & physics course I don't know how easy it would be for them to switch back if they changed their mind. There are no labs on maths and physics until the third year I think. (also something for the OP to consider) A switch from physics to maths & physics on the other hand would be impossible without restarting the degree. (I know someone who didn't have to but he was very much exceptional and took second year maths modules early to prove this) But I don't know a lot about that course.
You would be correct in the fact that I sought out an answer from both Universities on wether a transfer is possible and Warwick did say that it is possible to do early on as you said.

I assume that switching from the MathsPhys course to physics is pretty easy as the compulsory modules are still covered. They did say that they’ve had students switch to either single honours maths or physics at the end of the first year; provided they met certain requirements in modules.

And yeah switching from physics to maths and physics would definitely be impossible after some time, That’s why, given the I’m still on the fence, I would prefer the option to potential try maths initially and then drop either etc rather than regret not being able to do it later.
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_gcx
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(Original post by SaintSaint)
You would be correct in the fact that I sought out an answer from both Universities on wether a transfer is possible and Warwick did say that it is possible to do early on as you said.

I assume that switching from the MathsPhys course to physics is pretty easy as the compulsory modules are still covered. They did say that they’ve had students switch to either single honours maths or physics at the end of the first year; provided they met certain requirements in modules.

And yeah switching from physics to maths and physics would definitely be impossible after some time, That’s why, given the I’m still on the fence, I would prefer the option to potential try maths initially and then drop either etc rather than regret not being able to do it later.
All cool then. Bear in mind the transfer from maths and physics to maths is pretty hard and you need to come quite high up in your year to get it. (well into a first) You can do plenty of maths on the maths & physics degree the issue would only come if you wanted to do mainly maths. Feel free to ask about my experiences on the maths course. I started on maths and stats and transferred to straight maths at the end of first year.
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by _gcx)
All cool then. Bear in mind the transfer from maths and physics to maths is pretty hard and you need to come quite high up in your year to get it. (well into a first) You can do plenty of maths on the maths & physics degree the issue would only come if you wanted to do mainly maths. Feel free to ask about my experiences on the maths course. I started on maths and stats and transferred to straight maths at the end of first year.
Oh do you go to Warwick? I hope its alright if I throw some questions your way (sorry if it end up being quite a long list.)

I guess my first question would be, how are you finding the Maths course, What do you like and dislike about the course (modules, professors etc.) What is studying maths at degree kevel like and how does it differ to A-Level. (was it different to what you expected.)

Some other questions would probably be more to do with the place in general. How do you find the campus? I did visit it yesterday but im having conflicted opinions. On one hand it was definitely nice and most of it was modern. But it did seem to be isolated and whilst it didnt seen small, it also wasnt that big. My fear being that I could potentially get bored of the place seeing as how I would be spending so much of my time there. Is there much to do Socially/ How do you find the nightlife/drinking scene.

I know that Warwick has been facing alot of problems with sexual assault and rape, How does this affect students, by being affiliated with this reputation - How much is the university doing inorder to ensure changes are made.

How is the work/life balance? I did manage to talk to two third year stem students and they did say that especially in first year, the work load can be very large. How did you find this? And how helpful were tutors etc if you needed help or how easily could you find help when stuck on an assignment or question etc.

Thanks for your help, I greatly appreciate it
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_gcx
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(Original post by SaintSaint)
Oh do you go to Warwick? I hope its alright if I throw some questions your way (sorry if it end up being quite a long list.)

I guess my first question would be, how are you finding the Maths course, What do you like and dislike about the course (modules, professors etc.) What is studying maths at degree kevel like and how does it differ to A-Level. (was it different to what you expected.)

Some other questions would probably be more to do with the place in general. How do you find the campus? I did visit it yesterday but im having conflicted opinions. On one hand it was definitely nice and most of it was modern. But it did seem to be isolated and whilst it didnt seen small, it also wasnt that big. My fear being that I could potentially get bored of the place seeing as how I would be spending so much of my time there. Is there much to do Socially/ How do you find the nightlife/drinking scene.

I know that Warwick has been facing alot of problems with sexual assault and rape, How does this affect students, by being affiliated with this reputation - How much is the university doing inorder to ensure changes are made.

How is the work/life balance? I did manage to talk to two third year stem students and they did say that especially in first year, the work load can be very large. How did you find this? And how helpful were tutors etc if you needed help or how easily could you find help when stuck on an assignment or question etc.

Thanks for your help, I greatly appreciate it
I have an exam this morning but will reply to this after.
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by _gcx)
I have an exam this morning but will reply to this after.
Okay thank you so much
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4D Chess
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(Original post by SaintSaint)
My fear being that I could potentially get bored of the place seeing as how I would be spending so much of my time there.
lmao I got bored of it very quickly, like after a few days. But sometimes taking a walk on the pathways through the forests can be nice I guess.
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by 4D Chess)
lmao I got bored of it very quickly, like after a few days. But sometimes taking a walk on the pathways through the forests can be nice I guess.
Are you a Warwick student?
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(Original post by SaintSaint)
Are you a Warwick student?
Yes. First year maths ._.
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SaintSaint
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(Original post by 4D Chess)
Yes. First year maths ._.
could I potentially ask you some questions on insta?
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sweetcherry55
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(Original post by _gcx)
All cool then. Bear in mind the transfer from maths and physics to maths is pretty hard and you need to come quite high up in your year to get it. (well into a first) You can do plenty of maths on the maths & physics degree the issue would only come if you wanted to do mainly maths. Feel free to ask about my experiences on the maths course. I started on maths and stats and transferred to straight maths at the end of first year.
Hi

I hope you can give me some insight into Maths Degree at Queen Mary. My son planning to do Pure maths because that's what he enjoys the most, He is also studying Further maths. Now Queen Mary is one of the few university doing Pure however he also applied to other uni to study Mathematics.
My concern is most people keep saying Uni Maths is very different to A level. I can understand Unit studies are not same as A level but I am worried University Maths would be vey difficult or something completely different to what he is hoping.

My son find anything Language based, such as essay based or lot of explanation in words challenging, he has speaking and language delay however he has improved a lot over the years. Do yo think he would struggle with this course? Do you think someone who get grade A for Maths and Further maths would be able to cope.

I am worried because obliviously he wouldn't get support how he get support at school but he is an able mathematician however has other language issues.

Can you please give me some information what he could do over the holidays to find out or get some exposure to the level of Maths he would do at uni? and any tips.
Thanks
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_gcx
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(Original post by sweetcherry55)
Hi

I hope you can give me some insight into Maths Degree at Queen Mary. My son planning to do Pure maths because that's what he enjoys the most, He is also studying Further maths. Now Queen Mary is one of the few university doing Pure however he also applied to other uni to study Mathematics.
My concern is most people keep saying Uni Maths is very different to A level. I can understand Unit studies are not same as A level but I am worried University Maths would be vey difficult or something completely different to what he is hoping.

My son find anything Language based, such as essay based or lot of explanation in words challenging, he has speaking and language delay however he has improved a lot over the years. Do yo think he would struggle with this course? Do you think someone who get grade A for Maths and Further maths would be able to cope.

I am worried because obliviously he wouldn't get support how he get support at school but he is an able mathematician however has other language issues.

Can you please give me some information what he could do over the holidays to find out or get some exposure to the level of Maths he would do at uni? and any tips.
Thanks
I don't know anything specific about the course at Queen Mary. I would definitely say that lack of good English skills could be a problem. After A-level, maths becomes a lot like other sciences in the sense that there is a lot of rich theory involved, which will involve having to understand long sections of prose, especially with pure. I don't know what accommodations you would get with a learning difficulty, you should ask QM about that.

As to reading, you should see if QM gives any handy recommendations. In terms of my own: you have two big tranches of pure maths. One is analysis, which basically builds on the calculus he's done at school, but will be from a more rigorous perspective. It goes much further and opens up into a fundamental part of maths. Another is algebra, where you look at more general "algebraic structures". (for example you'll have seen the integers with addition & multiplication - we look at structures that are "similar" to the integers, called rings, and get some useful generalisations) Unless he did FP2 at school (where group theory is covered), the closest he's seen will probably be in his study of matrices and linear transformations. (these relate quite directly to the field of linear algebra)

Usually areas of advanced maths use or build upon tools from either or both of these. Apostol Calculus is quite good. (Spivak's text is also fairly well know) I think Beardon Algebra & Geometry is quite good too. As to areas of the A-level that are particularly useful - proof by contradiction is fundamental, proof by induction is pretty common, matrices/complex numbers/differential equations are all fairly important. Ideally you should get to a point where you can differentiate and integrate kind of "just like that". The stuff on polar coordinates may help for vector calculus.
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sweetcherry55
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(Original post by _gcx)
I don't know anything specific about the course at Queen Mary. I would definitely say that lack of good English skills could be a problem. After A-level, maths becomes a lot like other sciences in the sense that there is a lot of rich theory involved, which will involve having to understand long sections of prose, especially with pure. I don't know what accommodations you would get with a learning difficulty, you should ask QM about that.

As to reading, you should see if QM gives any handy recommendations. In terms of my own: you have two big tranches of pure maths. One is analysis, which basically builds on the calculus he's done at school, but will be from a more rigorous perspective. It goes much further and opens up into a fundamental part of maths. Another is algebra, where you look at more general "algebraic structures". (for example you'll have seen the integers with addition & multiplication - we look at structures that are "similar" to the integers, called rings, and get some useful generalisations) Unless he did FP2 at school (where group theory is covered), the closest he's seen will probably be in his study of matrices and linear transformations. (these relate quite directly to the field of linear algebra)

Usually areas of advanced maths use or build upon tools from either or both of these. Apostol Calculus is quite good. (Spivak's text is also fairly well know) I think Beardon Algebra & Geometry is quite good too. As to areas of the A-level that are particularly useful - proof by contradiction is fundamental, proof by induction is pretty common, matrices/complex numbers/differential equations are all fairly important. Ideally you should get to a point where you can differentiate and integrate kind of "just like that". The stuff on polar coordinates may help for vector calculus.
Thank yo for your detail reply, We choose Queen Mary because of pure Maths and London based uni so not far away from us, However the uni has been very helpful so far with his application , how they correspondence etc however I have nieces and nephews, friends been to the top uni such as UCL, Imperial and they basically expect you to do everything not much help given or not much support. So i am reluctant to send him even if he get good grades because the course will be very challenging and the students will more able students and he may find it very competitive and need to do more hard work,

However i am not sure any other course he could do other than Maths because mostly you need very good writing skills for other uni courses.
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helloPeople1
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(Original post by _gcx)
I have an exam this morning but will reply to this after.
hey sorry to pester you, can you answer this if you have the time to?
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_gcx
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hey sorry to pester you, can you answer this if you have the time to?
I was typing a reply but accidentally deleted it lol - I will try to reply to it tonight!
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helloPeople1
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(Original post by _gcx)
I was typing a reply but accidentally deleted it lol - I will try to reply to it tonight!
thankyou
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(Original post by SaintSaint)
Oh do you go to Warwick? I hope its alright if I throw some questions your way (sorry if it end up being quite a long list.)

I guess my first question would be, how are you finding the Maths course, What do you like and dislike about the course (modules, professors etc.) What is studying maths at degree kevel like and how does it differ to A-Level. (was it different to what you expected.)

Some other questions would probably be more to do with the place in general. How do you find the campus? I did visit it yesterday but im having conflicted opinions. On one hand it was definitely nice and most of it was modern. But it did seem to be isolated and whilst it didnt seen small, it also wasnt that big. My fear being that I could potentially get bored of the place seeing as how I would be spending so much of my time there. Is there much to do Socially/ How do you find the nightlife/drinking scene.

I know that Warwick has been facing alot of problems with sexual assault and rape, How does this affect students, by being affiliated with this reputation - How much is the university doing inorder to ensure changes are made.

How is the work/life balance? I did manage to talk to two third year stem students and they did say that especially in first year, the work load can be very large. How did you find this? And how helpful were tutors etc if you needed help or how easily could you find help when stuck on an assignment or question etc.

Thanks for your help, I greatly appreciate it
I disliked the first year of the course, I thought it was quite slow and uninspiring. Bear in mind everyone comes into university at different levels and they have to get everyone up to scratch. A few people find the first year fairly straightforward, a lot seem to find it a substantial jump from school maths. The second year was much more interesting and the assignment questions were much more exciting and inspiring. In the third year it opens up even more.

I had done a fairly substantial amount of university maths before university (you don't have to do this, I did it for interest only) so I knew pretty much precisely what to expect. Many didn't and were shocked to find that maths at university is a lot different to maths at school.

It differs from A-level in that the approach is solidly "theory-first". At A-level you'll have read about a topic, perhaps had an algorithm outlined to you, then seen it applied to a few examples, and then you'd answer 20 or so questions asking basically the same thing. At university you are more focused on why things work rather than just using things that you take for granted. There are a lot of calculations but it becomes a lot more like other sciences with more rich theory. Those that don't really like proof or theory may be better served on a course such as physics.

I like the campus. Some bits are kind of bland, but there's a lot of green that's nice to walk around in. I've never felt like there's not much to do. It really depends who you're friends with. The campus is not very isolated either - it's right near the suburbs and not far from the city centre. I think the nightlife is fine.

I don't feel I can comment on the sexual assault stuff. There's ongoing protests about inaction. There isn't really any reputational damage in having a Warwick degree. I've never got the impression it's much worse than other universities, there was just one particularly high profile incident that brought a lot of it to the surface. Hopefully it'll be dealt with.

At no point did I really feel overwhelmed. First year second term is supposed to be the busiest of the degree. A lot of people find the degree quite hard and have to spend a lot of time on it. It is relatively easy to get help. You should find students on your course since they will be your most ready source for assignment help. Or students in higher years.
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