Poll: Criminal investigation
Continue studying Criminal Investigation and Policing (0)
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Kritika_Dave557
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Should I scrap attending university and studying for an undergraduate degree: Criminal Investigation and Policing, and instead get a job in Administration? At the moment I have completed my first year at university and my dad is saying that getting a job would help me earn money and also save for a house much faster than if a get a job after completing my last 2 years at university. He says there is no career for me as the environment is racist and it is best to earn money as fast as you can. I want to see what others have to say on this. Also I think many young adults will find it alot harder to be able to own their own homes and so is getting a job that important?
Last edited by Kritika_Dave557; 1 month ago
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by Kritika_Dave557)
Should I scrap attending university and studying for an undergraduate degree: Crininal Investigation and Policing, and instead get a job in Administration? At the moment I have completed my first year at university and my dad is saying that getting a job would help me earn money and also save for a house much faster than if a get a job after completing my last 2 years at university. He says there is no career for me as the environment is racist and it is best to earn money as fast as you can. I want to see what others have to say on this. Also I think many young adults will find it alot harder to be able to own their own homes and so is getting a job that important?
My background is: I hold a MSEE [master's degree, Electrical Engineering - from a US accredited uni]. I graduated with my bachelor's in 1969. I went to work for the US Federal government. I found that the money was going out just about as fast as it was coming in - so i decided that i had to do something to "get ahead of the power curve (as we engineers would say). I looked around, and found that overseas 'tours' were available in which i could make about 2x my stateside base salary, and that additionally - the jobs were "meals and quarters furnished". That was the 'good' part. The 'not so good part' was that it was a 1 year tour (minimum), and that mail from there to stateside incurred about a 3 week delay, and that there were no "english speaking" ANYTHINGS for about 450 miles [the distance to the capitol in that country]. I ended up staying for 2 years, and came back with enough money to take over payments on a 3 br house on a 1/4 acre lot in suburban DC. The former owner had a 6.5% loan on it, and i was able to 'assume' the loan. With 'very good credit' - the rate for new loans at the time [Carter was in the White House, so interest rates were sky high] was 17.5%. Taking over the prev owner's loan saved me thousands in interest. I was able to do so, because i was able to 'buy out' his equity - which required about $22,000USD. Fortunately, i had more than that in my checking account due to my 2 yrs overseas. At the time, a 2 bedroom apartment (flat) in a "so-so" part of town was about $900/month. My house payment was $257/month. The savings added up pretty fast, as you can imagine.

You mentioned that 'the whole world is racist'. I have spent my entire working career with technical professionals in engineering and computer science. Based upon my experience since 1969, both within the USA and overseas - if you are GOOD at what you do, you can be orange with green polka-dots, and nobody would notice. If you're NOT good, it's the same, but you're not gonna get any advancement to speak of, and may not retain your job for long. II have worked with quite a few oriental people [mainly i software] over the years. They impressed me as more 'detail oriented' and meticulous that most anglos. If i had a software project that i thought required considerable attention to detail to come out right - i'd try to get an oriental person on it.

I occasionally had small 'production runs' of electronic hardware. The first one or two items were usually built by technicians in an engineering lab. They were (as you would expect - being prototypes) rather messy and crude. Follow-on items were usually built in a "wire shop". The staff in wire shops was almost entirely female. The first few items were often messy too. After they built one or two items, the gals workmanship would dramatically improve. Those guys that tried doing this sort of work would improve for one or two items, but then they would be building messy junk again. Guys just can't do that sort of work - this is based on over 30 years of my experience. I can't do it myself - my boxes are messy too. They work, but they're messy.

I don't know what sort of degree you are/were working on, but the 'best paying' degrees are engineering, IT, medicine, law, in my experience. Currently, someone who is 30'ish, and has a masters degree in electrical engineering, and is good, can expect about $100,000 to $125,000USD per year around the D.C. area. If they are GOOD! you could add about $25k to $30k to that. I don't care if they are female and orange with green polka-dots. Being willing to travel to obscure, out of the way places will add a little more also.

I went back and did a master's degree about 11 years after i got my bachelors, because i found that nobody would trust you with a 'medium sized' project [$1mill to $5mill] if you didn't have a masters in your profession. Interestingly enough, the people making the hire/no-hire decisions mostly did NOT have master's degrees themselves. Figure that one out!!! They also did not have even bachelor's degrees in a technical subject. GRRRR! Don't let me get started on that! Best of luck!!!
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Rabbit2
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My apologies. I was half asleep when i wrote the response above - after working for about 15 hrs. You DID say criminal justice!! I have no experience in that area - but i know from a couple of my neighbors (on this side of the pond), that their organisations require a college degree to become a sergeant or higher in rank. I believe FBI requires a college degree also. Best of luck!!
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Kritika_Dave557
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(Original post by Rabbit2)
My apologies. I was half asleep when i wrote the response above - after working for about 15 hrs. You DID say criminal justice!! I have no experience in that area - but i know from a couple of my neighbors (on this side of the pond), that their organisations require a college degree to become a sergeant or higher in rank. I believe FBI requires a college degree also. Best of luck!!
Thank you very much for the answer. It was quite interesting. Best of luck to you too! Thank you!
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Joleee
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what do you mean by administration (?) you mean like an administrative assistant? do you have prior working experience? because it's typically required.

are you going to be happy working long-term in administration and are you aware there's not much room for career growth or salary growth? the pay isn't all that impressive either, so you might not be buying that house as fast as you would like. plus, over the years you'll be making way more money in policing.

are you working part-time to save money while you're at uni? if not, how come?
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