Quickest way to get into university at 24

Watch
Araja22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I'm 24 years old, I've had enough of minimum wage, brain destroying work, I have one A level grade B and one grade E both in languages and I am level two AAT qualifiedWhat would be the quickest way into university, I would prefer a degree that leads to a vocation, something science related?
0
reply
Thisismyunitsr
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Araja22)
I'm 24 years old, I've had enough of minimum wage, brain destroying work, I have one A level grade B and one grade E both in languages and I am level two AAT qualifiedWhat would be the quickest way into university, I would prefer a degree that leads to a vocation, something science related?
You could possibly get into university with just the B, it wouldn’t be a very good university though. You can either do a foundation degree at university or do an access to HE course at a college.
0
reply
Araja22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Thisismyunitsr)
You could possibly get into university with just the B, it wouldn’t be a very good university though. You can either do a foundation degree at university or do an access to HE course at a college.
Would I have to just directly contact universities to apply?
0
reply
Kogomogo
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Access course (either at a college or online) or see if you can get in foundation year. Look at uni course pages and check out the entry requirements.

Most people normally apply to unis using ucas, if you already meet course requirements you might be able to get in this year using ucas extra or clearing. As for college level courses check out their websites for application information.
1
reply
Thisismyunitsr
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Araja22)
Would I have to just directly contact universities to apply?
You can apply to the foundation courses though UCAS.
0
reply
SLS123
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Perhaps look into a HNC or HND
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
The first thing you need to do is decide what you want to study at uni, to make sure you are taking the right courses to progress to the degree you want to do. After that, probably an Access to HE course is the most generally applicable route, as these are 1 year, intensive courses designed specifically for mature students looking to go back to uni. You can get the tuition fees for these funded through an Advanced Learner Loan (ALL), and unlike other level 3 courses funded this way, if you subsequently complete a degree you get the ALL written off

However, you should be aware that not all Access to HE courses are accepted by all degree programmes/universities, so you would need to contact any universities you wish to apply to beforehand with details of the Access course(s) you are considering, to see if they are acceptable. Especially in STEM fields requiring a maths background, you may find they won't/can't accept the Access course by itself and might require it to be taken alongside A-level Maths or similar. One caveat is that the course is usually quite intensive I gather and it might be difficult to balance working while on the course, and you won't get any kind of "maintenance" loan. So you will need to plan your finances appropriately on that front.

Other alternatives include taking A-levels independently, possibly through a distance learning operator (many of which offer "fast track" A-levels to be taken in one year), doing some modules with the Open University, or seeing if you can apply directly to a degree with a foundation year. While with the A-level route you know you will meet the entry criteria if you get the appropriate grades, the downsides of this option are that you may or may not be able to get it funded by an ALL as above. Additionally, for science A-levels universities usually require you take and pass the science endorsement for any science subject(s) you are taking. My understanding is that it can be hard to find somewhere to do this, and it can be very expensive.

OU credits, like Access courses, aren't always accepted by all courses/universities, so you would need to contact them to see if this is acceptable and if any specific modules would be required. The foundation year route might be the most direct one, however often they might expect you to have some recent academic study first. However it still might be worth contacting unis offering these and see if they would consider you now; also a foundation year generally ties you to the uni you do it at, and there is no guarantee it would be accepted by other unis.
2
reply
Moonlight rain
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
Access course If the course you want allows it. It's easier and more flexible. And you will most likely you need some GCSE's
0
reply
JemimaJ
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Araja22)
I'm 24 years old, I've had enough of minimum wage, brain destroying work, I have one A level grade B and one grade E both in languages and I am level two AAT qualifiedWhat would be the quickest way into university, I would prefer a degree that leads to a vocation, something science related?
Hi,

well done you for taking on academia - it is worthwhile and it does lead to better prospects, do you know what you would like to do? I ask because this will make the difference on which way you go - some courses offer a foundation year which would be the easiest way as you do your foundation and if you stay with the university you go straight onto your chosen course without having to wait for conditional/unconditional offers through UCAS or you go down the access to higher course, which again is offered at some universities but does cost twice as much!

Weigh up what course you want to do and start to do some research because if you want to go in September you would need to be looking at open evenings/weekends for the foundation/access course be that at university or college and if you wanted to go to university would need to be looking at student finance as soon as possible.

Good luck with whatever you choose, you will enjoy it I am sure.
0
reply
AaronMock
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
I'm 26 and just finished my access course, I did humanities and social sciences as for me it allowed a wider scope on the degrees it allowed me to go on to, it's allowed me to get into Durham in September to do my Law degree. There quite intense and your not spoon fed the information as you would be in A levels and requires a lot more independent research. It seems more akin to university in this sense and also helps you build up your referencing skills ahead of uni, something A levels don't teach you, or atleast they didn't when I did mine initially. As previously stated these can be fully funded and are wrote off if you finish your degree, I would reccomend these courses to anybody 🙂 hope this helps!
0
reply
Uni of Hull Students
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Araja22)
I'm 24 years old, I've had enough of minimum wage, brain destroying work, I have one A level grade B and one grade E both in languages and I am level two AAT qualifiedWhat would be the quickest way into university, I would prefer a degree that leads to a vocation, something science related?
Hey Araja22,

I was in a very similar boat to you when I decided to come back to University, only I had lower grades and gave up on retail 2 years earlier!

I would highly recommend having a look around various different Universities and seeing what courses they have available and the modules that they do in these as a degree in Politics at Hull could be very different than Politics at somewhere else and ideally go for course content that appeals to you. Even scientific courses can have a lot of variation depending on the academics at that University.

As for choosing a degree based on vocation - it depends what you career you want to go into, have a look at this and see if they require a specific degree to be able to get your foot in the door, some will and some won't. For instance both myself and a friend of mine are considering the Civil Service Fast Stream after Uni, but they are doing history and I am doing politics and international relations and the CSFS usually don't require you to have a specific degree, just a grade.

As for getting into University, I got in through Clearing and on a course with a Foundation Year. If you are wanting to start in September this year I would recommend you apply through Clearing as you will stand a better chance of getting in for September, but if not you can look to apply through UCAS for next September as normal. Regarding Student Finance, whilst its better to apply sooner rather than later, I didn't apply for mine until late August and still was able to secure Student Finance.

Finally as a former Foundation Year student I would highly recommend applying for a course with FY anyway - for me I found it a brilliant way to transition back into academic life from retail work as it helped build those skills alongside doing actual Uni work at an actual university with a few sleepless nights at the Uni library, I sometimes find that access courses can be good but they don't prepare you for the full University experience and the extra year in Foundation can massively boost your skills and confidence going into First Year and help you get even more out of your time at University.

I hope this information helps, if you have any more questions feel free to message me on Unibuddy and I shall be happy to answer questions you might have:
https://api.unibuddy.co/og/universit...Position=share

Good luck with whatever you decide to do and wherever you decide to go!

Isaac
2nd Year Politics and International Relations (with Foundation Year)
University of Hull Student Representative
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Poll: What factors affect your mental health most right now? Post-lockdown edition

Anxiousness about restrictions easing (43)
5.8%
Uncertainty around my education (84)
11.34%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (79)
10.66%
Lack of purpose or motivation (94)
12.69%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (39)
5.26%
Impact lockdown had on physical health (42)
5.67%
Social worries (incl. loneliness/making friends) (80)
10.8%
Financial worries (50)
6.75%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (32)
4.32%
Exposure to negative news/social media (46)
6.21%
Difficulty accessing real life entertainment (24)
3.24%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (71)
9.58%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (57)
7.69%

Watched Threads

View All