Munrhe
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Hi. Looking to do maths and physics and trying to find 5th UCAS choice. Researched websites, TEF, rankings, student satisfaction but still none the wiser. Not looking at London/Manchester/Birmingham unis as prefer non-big city unis. Ideal uni would be one that is good enough in maths and excellent in physics (as main interest). Would love to hear from anyone with experience of any other university, e.g. Bath, Bristol etc. thank you!!
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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Daughter studies physics at Lancaster uni. Its not a big city, and the campus is about 15-20 mins on the bus to the city. She's not a fan of a big city either, so Lancaster is ideal . The physics course, staff have all been amazing and considering her first year has been affected by covid and restrictions, Lancasters done pretty well compared to some other unis.
Its very good for physics internships too.
The maths has been great. Its a good integration from A'level into degree level, and so far she's found vector calculus at the end of the year the most challenging.
If you want a place that's not a big city, still is pretty decent nightlife (not hardcore every night clubber), lots of bars, a uni thats very respected in physics, close to the sea, and campus that feels pretty safe at night, Lancaster is a good one.
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Munrhe
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(Original post by 𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂)
Daughter studies physics at Lancaster uni. Its not a big city, and the campus is about 15-20 mins on the bus to the city. She's not a fan of a big city either, so Lancaster is ideal . The physics course, staff have all been amazing and considering her first year has been affected by covid and restrictions, Lancasters done pretty well compared to some other unis.
Its very good for physics internships too.
The maths has been great. Its a good integration from A'level into degree level, and so far she's found vector calculus at the end of the year the most challenging.
If you want a place that's not a big city, still is pretty decent nightlife (not hardcore every night clubber), lots of bars, a uni thats very respected in physics, close to the sea, and campus that feels pretty safe at night, Lancaster is a good one.
Thank you very much. I saw your post elsewhere and found it really helpful. I was hoping with this post to get a 5th option (Lancaster already being the 4 chosen although I do not understand what happened to their league table result this year as it moved dramatically down for physics and maths).
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username5508856
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(Original post by Munrhe)
Thank you very much. I saw your post elsewhere and found it really helpful. I was hoping with this post to get a 5th option (Lancaster already being the 4 chosen although I do not understand what happened to their league table result this year as it moved dramatically down for physics and maths).
What other universities have you already chosen?
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Munrhe
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(Original post by Uni_Student321)
What other universities have you already chosen?
Sorry, I thought my post was clear but now realising it was not. Apologies. Oxford/Warwick/Durham/Lancaster chosen. Thank you.
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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(Original post by Munrhe)
Thank you very much. I saw your post elsewhere and found it really helpful. I was hoping with this post to get a 5th option (Lancaster already being the 4 chosen although I do not understand what happened to their league table result this year as it moved dramatically down for physics and maths).
Welcome not sure why it moved down the league table, as facilities wise it has some of the best. Only thing I can think of its covid. With covid there was not as many internship opportunities and networking chances, and students had to leave early last year. It has been challenging, especially as the only in person contact this year has been lab sessions, but as far as I know from daughter and her friends, the online teaching has been great. Dr Sobral, Sergey, Bertram, Ross are just a few that have been excellent and Shirley the physics co-ordinator always answers emails, even at weekends.

As for other unis, there are high ranking unis that have not let their students back on site for Jan until April 2021 (where lancasters been less strict) so likely they might go down on next years table. Ratings at the moment will be forever changing because of how each uni as handled covid recently, so its really hard to gauge.
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Munrhe
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(Original post by 𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂)
Welcome not sure why it moved down the league table, as facilities wise it has some of the best. Only thing I can think of its covid. With covid there was not as many internship opportunities and networking chances, and students had to leave early last year. It has been challenging, especially as the only in person contact this year has been lab sessions, but as far as I know from daughter and her friends, the online teaching has been great. Dr Sobral, Sergey, Bertram, Ross are just a few that have been excellent and Shirley the physics co-ordinator always answers emails, even at weekends.

As for other unis, there are high ranking unis that have not let their students back on site for Jan until April 2021 (where lancasters been less strict) so likely they might go down on next years table. Ratings at the moment will be forever changing because of how each uni as handled covid recently, so its really hard to gauge.
Thank you so much, you are incredibly helpful and that makes sense. Enjoy the rest of your weekend.
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_gcx
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This is tangential to your question - but why maths & physics over a straight physics degree? you seem a bit hesitant on the maths side. Bear in mind maths is a lot different at university, and if you don't much fancy maths for maths sake you might be better off on a straight physics degree.

The maths department at Warwick is excellent but never had the impression that its physics department was quite as good, I may well be wrong in that though. (I haven't looked at physics degrees) You would directly benefit from the strength of the maths department since you'd be taking modules straight from there.
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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(Original post by Munrhe)
Thank you so much, you are incredibly helpful and that makes sense. Enjoy the rest of your weekend.
thanks you too
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Munrhe
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(Original post by _gcx)
This is tangential to your question - but why maths & physics over a straight physics degree? you seem a bit hesitant on the maths side. Bear in mind maths is a lot different at university, and if you don't much fancy maths for maths sake you might be better off on a straight physics degree.

The maths department at Warwick is excellent but never had the impression that its physics department was quite as good, I may well be wrong in that though. (I haven't looked at physics degrees) You would directly benefit from the strength of the maths department since you'd be taking modules straight from there.
Thank you and we originally only looked at theoretical physics and astrophysics degrees but as the whole school career was highly maths dominated and a number of teachers recommended a combination degree as they said that it is very helpful to do further maths to understand the more complex physics, we moved on to look at combinations. They ask thought this would make it more flexible in case either is found not to be so interesting after all.

I get the flexibility point and agree that this is valuable. I am not sure that you cannot get the required maths though in the actual physics degree itself. I went to the Bath open day and that suggested that the maths is simply taught separately by the maths department (even though it is sold as a joint degree). That makes less sense to me as learning maths for maths sake and not to apply this to physics seems strange.

Practicals are not a favourite so straight physics degrees are not so great. Particle physics, relativity, cosmology etc (anything really except waves and electricity) all seem so fascinating. Space and astrophysics looks great. CERN as an institution would be wonderful to work for.

Anyway, still deliberating…
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_gcx
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(Original post by Munrhe)
Thank you and we originally only looked at theoretical physics and astrophysics degrees but as the whole school career was highly maths dominated and a number of teachers recommended a combination degree as they said that it is very helpful to do further maths to understand the more complex physics, we moved on to look at combinations. They ask thought this would make it more flexible in case either is found not to be so interesting after all.

I get the flexibility point and agree that this is valuable. I am not sure that you cannot get the required maths though in the actual physics degree itself. I went to the Bath open day and that suggested that the maths is simply taught separately by the maths department (even though it is sold as a joint degree). That makes less sense to me as learning maths for maths sake and not to apply this to physics seems strange.

Practicals are not a favourite so straight physics degrees are not so great. Particle physics, relativity, cosmology etc (anything really except waves and electricity) all seem so fascinating. Space and astrophysics looks great. CERN as an institution would be wonderful to work for.

Anyway, still deliberating…
Further maths is good for a physics degree, would agree there. I think it is true that some physics degrees might not give you the mathematical background for some mathematically intensive physics-based masters, but I haven't looked too much into it. (for example, for Part III (Applied Maths and) Theoretical Physics at Cambridge, you need quite a lot of experience in maths) Not really sure about in industry.

That's what I mean - pretty much any maths and physics degree you come across will be like that. You'll study maths and you'll study physics. Particular attention will be given to the intersection (mainly various flavours of Analysis: Calculus of Variations, PDEs, Complex Analysis so on) but you'll generally be studying exactly the same modules as the maths lot does and may well attend the same lectures. This is the case at Warwick (with a few exceptions in the first year) and is probably the case elsewhere. If you're only interested in maths when taught for immediate applications in physics, then you might be better off on the physics degree as I say, and doing extra maths if you need to. It's worth weighing up with what you want to do after university.

[I think we may have spoken before, recognise your name - I'm doing maths at Warwick and happy to answer any questions about Warwick or the maths course]
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𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂
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(Original post by Munrhe)
Thank you and we originally only looked at theoretical physics and astrophysics degrees but as the whole school career was highly maths dominated and a number of teachers recommended a combination degree as they said that it is very helpful to do further maths to understand the more complex physics, we moved on to look at combinations. They ask thought this would make it more flexible in case either is found not to be so interesting after all.

I get the flexibility point and agree that this is valuable. I am not sure that you cannot get the required maths though in the actual physics degree itself. I went to the Bath open day and that suggested that the maths is simply taught separately by the maths department (even though it is sold as a joint degree). That makes less sense to me as learning maths for maths sake and not to apply this to physics seems strange.

Practicals are not a favourite so straight physics degrees are not so great. Particle physics, relativity, cosmology etc (anything really except waves and electricity) all seem so fascinating. Space and astrophysics looks great. CERN as an institution would be wonderful to work for.

Anyway, still deliberating…
My eldest is doing a 4 years integrated masters at physics, particle physics and cosmology at Lancs.
First year everyone who does physics, physic part and cos, phys, theo and phys; they all do physics first year.She's chosen her year two modules and they are particle physics based.

Year 1 from the pdf module list: (tried to upload the file but TSR says its too big)
12.1 Module List everyone does first year the same . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 Year 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.1 PHYS101 The Physical Universe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.2 PHYS102 Classical Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.3 PHYS103 Electric & Magnetic Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.4 PHYS104 Thermal Properties of Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.5 PHYS105 Quantum Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.6 PHYS111 Functions & Differentiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.7 PHYS112 Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.8 PHYS113 Series & Differential Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.9 PHYS114 Complex Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.10PHYS115 Vector Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.11PHYS131 Vectors & Vector Algebra - IT Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.12PHYS132 Basic Physics Skills - Communication Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.13PHYS133 Oscillations & Waves - Practical Laboratory I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.14PHYS134 Electrical Circuits & Instruments - Practical Laboratory II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2.15PHYS135 Optics & Optical Instruments - Practical Laboratory III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

This is year two from their pdf module sheet
Particle Physics & Cosmology route:

In year 2, Particle Physics & Cosmology majors take the specialist modules PHYS263 Astronomy, PHYS256 Experimental Particle Physics, and PHYS265 Cosmology I. These are lecture-based modules designed to give students a foundation in the basics of particle physics and cosmology. Further specialist modules are taken in year 3. Specialist lecture based modules are PHYS366 Groups & Symmetries and PHYS367 Flavour Physics.
In year 3, students also take PHYS361 Cosmology II lectures plus a group project either PHYS353 Particle Physics Group Project or PHYS364 Cosmology Group Project. Students present the results of one of these projects at the conference "The PLACE".
For those who continue into Year 4, there is an advanced MPhys lecture course on cosmology, PHYS461 Cosmology III, and advanced particle physics modules PHYS412 Experimental Methods in Particle Physics and PHYS462 Gauge Theories, which will introduce students to some current research topics.

this is the 2016/2017 version https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/mc...dbook16-17.pdf
Last edited by 𝓖𝓱𝓸𝓼𝓽𝓵𝓪𝓭𝔂; 1 month ago
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