Do FY1/FY2s in hospital have a bigger responsibility than GPs do overall?

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medaspire91
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I was wondering, seeing how FY1 and FY2s actively manage acutely unwell patients in hospital and see the very patients who the GPs refer to clinics, if the responsibility overall for FY1 and FY2 is even greater than that of GPs and that more would be expected from them?

Thus, would the people going from FY2 to the GP scheme actually be considered a stepping down of sorts?
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Smile88egc
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No absolutely not, GPs carry a huge amount of responsibility and risk as would be clearly apparent to anyone who'd worked in general practice for any length of time.
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Helenia
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Lol, not in the slightest. Foundation docs always have several tiers of supervision over them in hospital, so while they may be doing all the things you describe, it's with the safety net of seniors to back them up or support/guide them. GPs - the buck stops with them.
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Etomidate
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Yikes
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No_fixed_abode
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Absolutely not. GPs have access to much fewer tests, see patients with much more undifferentiated presentations and (as stated before) the buck stops with them, as opposed to Foundation docs who have a wealth of senior, specialist experience around them.
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Democracy
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(Original post by medaspire91)
I was wondering, seeing how FY1 and FY2s actively manage acutely unwell patients in hospital and see the very patients who the GPs refer to clinics, if the responsibility overall for FY1 and FY2 is even greater than that of GPs and that more would be expected from them?

Thus, would the people going from FY2 to the GP scheme actually be considered a stepping down of sorts?
If this were the case then medical defence organisation indemnity fees would be highest for FY1/2s and lowest for GPs. The opposite is true however.

I think you need to look at it in terms of "who has overall responsibility for the patient and carries the medicolegal risk of managing them" which is either their GP or a consultant.

Sounds like you may have been dazzled by the big shiny building with all the clever doctors
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InArduisFouette
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(Original post by medaspire91)
I was wondering, seeing how FY1 and FY2s actively manage acutely unwell patients in hospital and see the very patients who the GPs refer to clinics, if the responsibility overall for FY1 and FY2 is even greater than that of GPs and that more would be expected from them?

Thus, would the people going from FY2 to the GP scheme actually be considered a stepping down of sorts?
you are either a troll or a 'pre fresher' if not a pre applicant

General Practitioners in the UK are deemed to be Specialists, they have ongoing responsibility for the care of their patients.

Foundation doctors have accountability and responsibility for their own practice and their own practice alone.

Arguably RNs have a greater responsibility and accountability for the in-patients in question than the Foundation Doctor, this accountability being shared with the Named Consultant or other Senior Doctor who is responsible Clinician for that patient / the Department at that time

have you ever seen or heard a junior Doctor get disciplined or sued for the actiosn or Omissions of an RN ( or AHP) or A GP ?

where GPs and RNs and AHPs rountinely carry the can for the actiosn and omissions of junior Doctors even if they themselves are not delcaring competence in the action in question
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fishfacesimpson
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Wow
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Anonymous #1
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Some of the doctors replying to these threads might do well to remember that they probably were pretty clueless themselves before they'd even started medical school.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Some of the doctors replying to these threads might do well to remember that they probably were pretty clueless themselves before they'd even started medical school.
Why do you have to be anonymous to make this observation?

This is the Current Medical Students forum so if OP isn't a medical student they shouldn't be posting here.
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Anonymous #2
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I agree with all of you, GPs have more independent practice and hence responsibility. But OPs question is hilarious lol
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Democracy)
Why do you have to be anonymous to make this observation?

This is the Current Medical Students forum so if OP isn't a medical student they shouldn't be posting here.
You are correct, I don't have to be anonymous to make that observation.

I would agree that this thread is in the wrong forum. From OP's post history, it appears he/she is not a a medical student.

But my observation is something I've noted in other threads on here too. Doctors who use this forum quite often seem to sneer at perceived "silly questions" from applicants. People would do well to remember where they started from.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by medaspire91)
I was wondering, seeing how FY1 and FY2s actively manage acutely unwell patients in hospital and see the very patients who the GPs refer to clinics, if the responsibility overall for FY1 and FY2 is even greater than that of GPs and that more would be expected from them?

Thus, would the people going from FY2 to the GP scheme actually be considered a stepping down of sorts?
Yeah, as a GP, I save all the really difficult cases for the F2, when they come, then go off on a 3 month sabbatical, leaving them to it. I should probably hang around for the next one, so they can teach me how to do things properly.
It takes us at least 3 years in GP Vocational Training to drag an F2 back down to our level, but still we persevere
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Democracy
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(Original post by Anonymous)
You are correct, I don't have to be anonymous to make that observation.

I would agree that this thread is in the wrong forum. From OP's post history, it appears he/she is not a a medical student.

But my observation is something I've noted in other threads on here too. Doctors who use this forum quite often seem to sneer at perceived "silly questions" from applicants. People would do well to remember where they started from.
Being anonymous doesn't make you completely hidden you know. It's pretty clear who you might be so you might as well state your opinion openly, no one here is going to kneecap you for it.

(Original post by GANFYD)
Yeah, as a GP, I save all the really difficult cases for the F2, when they come, then go off on a 3 month sabbatical, leaving them to it. I should probably hang around for the next one, so they can teach me how to do things properly.
It takes us at least 3 years in GP Vocational Training to drag an F2 back down to our level, but still we persevere
I think MRCGP is basically a repeat of A level biology. Must remember to brush up on my photosynthesis, that's a thing humans do right? :dontknow:
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Democracy)
I think MRCGP is basically a repeat of A level biology. Must remember to brush up on my photosynthesis, that's a thing humans do right? :dontknow:
How would I know? I'm just a GP
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NHSFan
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(Original post by medaspire91)
I was wondering, seeing how FY1 and FY2s actively manage acutely unwell patients in hospital and see the very patients who the GPs refer to clinics, if the responsibility overall for FY1 and FY2 is even greater than that of GPs and that more would be expected from them?

Thus, would the people going from FY2 to the GP scheme actually be considered a stepping down of sorts?
Please tell me you are joking!?
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No_fixed_abode
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Some of the doctors replying to these threads might do well to remember that they probably were pretty clueless themselves before they'd even started medical school.
I do think it is reasonable to bring that up. To the OP: I am not looking to berate you, but you will see from everyone on here that, for all the reasons described, all the doctors on here are giving a hard "no". I can understand that this is quite a prevalent opinion amongst non-healthcare workers, and that this is may be media driven, but this is the answer we have for you.

And yes, you might want to consider this is for current medical students and doctors so you might need to be a bit more aware of where you post these questions :P
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nexttime
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Yeah that's probably a fair assessment.









...

In reality you are very supported as an FY1 and to a lesser extent FY2 - much more than you realise at the time.
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