When IAPT & CBT Aren't enough and you need secondary care

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ValeciaCho
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I've been doing CBT with IAPT since the start of the yr. Hasn't really helped massively, but has helped a bit in the short term. Maybe for about a week or so.

Anyways, my therapist did say we knew that CBT wouldn't be sufficient and he would try to refer me to secondary care, but it could be a case of me qualifying for primary care, but not severe enough for secondary.

Aaaaww... I just wanna get on with my life. I came out as trans in 2013 and I just wanna finish my surgeries in the next yr or so. I even signed up for Access to Nursing this September.

Someone help me out here. What do I do if I can't get secondary care.
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glassalice
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The NHS expects people to wait until they are extremely suicidal, too unwell to care themselves or severely underweight (depending on the exact nature of their mental health difficulties).

Remeber though, you can't criticise the NHS cult. Anyone they does risks getting slapped in the face with an EUPD diagnosis of exclusion.
Last edited by glassalice; 1 month ago
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BrDy
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speak to your gp if you can, explain the issues you're having and how they affect you, that CBT hasn't worked for you. All the people I know who got secondary care (without being hospitalised first) went through their GP who then referred them on.
good luck
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ValeciaCho
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(Original post by BrDy)
speak to your gp if you can, explain the issues you're having and how they affect you, that CBT hasn't worked for you. All the people I know who got secondary care (without being hospitalised first) went through their GP who then referred them on.
good luck
The therapist I had at IAPT is doing a referral. Not sure if I can also do one from GP at the same time?
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0le
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(Original post by glassalice)
The NHS expects people to wait until they are extremely suicidal, too unwell to care themselves or severely underweight (depending on the exact nature of their mental health difficulties).
I mean, this is just wrong though is it not? In an ideal world, the NHS would treat everyone quickly and to a standard level of service across the country. The reason there are delays and issues are due to prolonged lack of funding as well as the recent pandemic. Both of these things are not the fault of the NHS but the incumbent governments.

It should also be noted that schools and universities do usually have counsellors available and a good number of roles in employment also offer subsidised private medical care as well.

Remeber though, you can't criticise the NHS cult. Anyone they does risks getting slapped in the face with an EUPD diagnosis of exclusion.
What has complaining about the NHS got to do with a personality disorder?
Last edited by 0le; 1 month ago
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0le
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(Original post by ValeciaCho)
The therapist I had at IAPT is doing a referral. Not sure if I can also do one from GP at the same time?
One referral should be sufficient, although if you do not hear back after several weeks, it is worth getting an update from the therapist.
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glassalice
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(Original post by 0le)
I mean, this is just wrong though is it not? In an ideal world, the NHS would treat everyone quickly and to a standard level of service across the country. The reason there are delays and issues are due to prolonged lack of funding as well as the recent pandemic. Both of these things are not the fault of the NHS but the incumbent governments.

It should also be noted that schools and universities do usually have counsellors available and a good number of roles in employment also offer subsidised private medical care as well.



What has complaining about the NHS got to do with a personality disorder?
There where significant delays and issues before the pandemic. This is nothing new. Anyone who has had a significant amount of contact with mental health services will tell you the same thing. The pandemic has simply brought it to the public's attention.
Austerity didn't help matters, however piss poor management within the NHS is a majorly contributes to their monitary problems.
Counselling alone isn't a suitable treatment for severe mental health problems.

Many people report only receiving a diagnosis of PD after they have made a complaint about NHS mental health services. Sometimes the diagnosis is hidden from the patient and they only discover it by chance. Mostly, the diagnosis is made on the basis of the psychiatrist's gut instinct, rather than structured diagnostic assesments.
The guidance given out to GPs regarding personality disorders often states that complaint making is a symptom.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by glassalice)
There where significant delays and issues before the pandemic. This is nothing new. Anyone who has had a significant amount of contact with mental health services will tell you the same thing. The pandemic has simply brought it to the public's attention.
Austerity didn't help matters, however piss poor management within the NHS is a majorly contributes to their monitary problems.
Counselling alone isn't a suitable treatment for severe mental health problems.

Many people report only receiving a diagnosis of PD after they have made a complaint about NHS mental health services. Sometimes the diagnosis is hidden from the patient and they only discover it by chance. Mostly, the diagnosis is made on the basis of the psychiatrist's gut instinct, rather than structured diagnostic assesments.
The guidance given out to GPs regarding personality disorders often states that complaint making is a symptom.
Funnily enough, it's pretty different in the US. In the UK a diagnosis of EUPD means the person can basically be ignored and told everything is their own fault. Saves the NHS a lot of resources and the person can be forgotten about. However, EUPD isn't as common in the US - drug therapy is far more common and doctors make money diagnosing people with bipolar which can then be treated with drugs and they have a repeat customer.
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0le
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(Original post by glassalice)
There where significant delays and issues before the pandemic. This is nothing new. Anyone who has had a significant amount of contact with mental health services will tell you the same thing. The pandemic has simply brought it to the public's attention.
I would say that most people knew about long waiting times on the NHS well before the pandemic (e.g. see link below). What has been bought into public attention is more awareness of general mental heath issues, but this awareness was also growing before the pandemic as well.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-50397856

Austerity didn't help matters, however piss poor management within the NHS is a majorly contributes to their monitary problems.
Perhaps. But I reckon you can label that accusation at just about every company and industry as well.

Counselling alone isn't a suitable treatment for severe mental health problems.
Yes, but to clarify, I did not say it was.

Many people report only receiving a diagnosis of PD after they have made a complaint about NHS mental health services. Sometimes the diagnosis is hidden from the patient and they only discover it by chance. Mostly, the diagnosis is made on the basis of the psychiatrist's gut instinct, rather than structured diagnostic assesments.
The guidance given out to GPs regarding personality disorders often states that complaint making is a symptom.
Are you sure about that?

The current major diagnostic systems are the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition or ICD-10 (World Health Organisation, 1993), and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5 or DSM-5 (American Psychiatric association, 2014). Both have a set of general criteria for diagnosis of personality disorder and sets of criteria for a number of specific personality disorders.
https://www.nhshighland.scot.nhs.uk/...ormulation.pdf
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glassalice
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(Original post by 0le)
I would say that most people knew about long waiting times on the NHS well before the pandemic (e.g. see link below). What has been bought into public attention is more awareness of general mental heath issues, but this awareness was also growing before the pandemic as well.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-50397856



Perhaps. But I reckon you can label that accusation at just about every company and industry as well.
The NHS has a particularily severe problem with this.



Yes, but to clarify, I did not say it was.



Are you sure about that?

In practise, what I describe is absolutely the case.

https://www.nhshighland.scot.nhs.uk/...ormulation.pdf
(Original post by Sabertooth)
Funnily enough, it's pretty different in the US. In the UK a diagnosis of EUPD means the person can basically be ignored and told everything is their own fault. Saves the NHS a lot of resources and the person can be forgotten about. However, EUPD isn't as common in the US - drug therapy is far more common and doctors make money diagnosing people with bipolar which can then be treated with drugs and they have a repeat customer.
Don't know which is worse
It's worth noting that the vast majority of patients with EUPD end up on a cocktail of drugs in the UK.
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