Phatavocado
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Hiya.
I'm starting my adult and child health dual qualification nursing degree at Southampton in September.
I ws just wondering what current nurses/nursing students wished they'd of known before starting, or wished they had prepared?
Is there anything you'd recxomenwd doing before starting?
Any tips or tricks?
They'd be all. So much appreciated
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Jampea12
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Hey, Possibly looking around at what job opportunity's are around for when you're qualify as many just assume you'll be working in a hospital thats it but there so many more jobs out there in different sectors for nursing. Plus opportunity to work overseas, Australia or Canada are good ones for nursing work.

Recommend probably having a glance over anatomy and psychology you'll be taught this anyways but good to have a head start, look at the NMC Nursing and midwifery council to familiarise yourself with what will be expected of you. possibly look at working on a ward as a student nurse will be like search on YouTube, make sure you have comfortable Shoes as you'll be on your feet a lot recommend also getting compression socks if your not use to 12 hour shifts.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Phatavocado)
Hiya.
I'm starting my adult and child health dual qualification nursing degree at Southampton in September.
I ws just wondering what current nurses/nursing students wished they'd of known before starting, or wished they had prepared?
Is there anything you'd recxomenwd doing before starting?
Any tips or tricks?
They'd be all. So much appreciated
The only thing I'd say you need to do re preparation is make sure you have decent, smart, comfy shoes for placement.
There isn't really anything you need to prepare, but a bit of reading on anatomy & physiology, the NMC code, the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Francis Report might be useful (by mentioning the Francis Report I'm not trying to scare you, just it's awareness of improvement and you'll see why when you read summaries!). You'll find extra reading to do once you've started on reading lists and in things you'll come across in placement.

Things people tend to wish they knew before starting:
- each year is split into modules. A module is worth a certain number of "credits" and you do 120 credits a year (so some modules may be worth more weight than others... or all the same) Your lecturer for one module may not be the same for another therefore may not know what's going on with another module. You have to pass every module to pass each year and the degree.
- Get yourself familiar with both physical library and eLibrary as soon as you get access. I found myself doing loads of reading while on public transport to various places.
- get your head around the referencing system - getting this right adds points to an assignment grade, getting it wrong deducts points and creates a higher risk of being accused of plagiarism.
- Where you get your placements is dependant upon which hospitals, community areas and private healthcare providers the university has links with (anywhere that tells you it's based solely upon your address is lying. Hopefully Southampton hasn't lied.). If you don't have your own transport, make sure you know what public transport is like for placement areas.
- If you admit to the university that you have your own car, or even having a full driving licence, there's a higher risk of you moving round different areas, which is brilliant for finding out how different hospitals work but really not great for getting your face known at a particular trust. (I do know people who got sent to a few different hospitals and community areas because they had a car, whereas the most I travelled was 20 mins bus journey for one spoke placement and stayed in accommodation on the Isle of Man for another 3 week spoke placement and the rest was a 20 min walk).
- any form of support isn't a hindrance - it really is a help! This includes people in your class, mentors and practice education team on placement, lecturers and study support people at uni etc.
- when on placement, get the HCAs on your side. This helps when qualified as well as as a student - remember that you're the doctor's eyes & ears on the ward and your HCAs are yours.
- you'll get some similar placements to your friends and some different. Pool both similar and different experiences and knowledge. You'll then make use of this once qualified.
- as a nurse, there's silly amounts of opportunities. Use your own experiences to figure out what areas you like (or, in my case, don't like!) and friends' experiences for things that might sound interesting.
- nowhere and nobody cares where you did your nursing degree. The NMC only care that you've passed a course accredited by them, employers only care that you can prove you're registered with the NMC and have passed your nursing degree. There's that many opportunities that the world really is your oyster.
- Each year gets harder in terms of academic work and placement expectations. It requires hard work, but a lot of students also put way too much pressure on themselves (I did that as a student and sometimes do now qualified!). Make use of support systems.

Sorry to bombard you with so much but it's just things I've come across that may help. Have been qualified 2 years so feel free to ask questions.
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Emily_B)
The only thing I'd say you need to do re preparation is make sure you have decent, smart, comfy shoes for placement.
There isn't really anything you need to prepare, but a bit of reading on anatomy & physiology, the NMC code, the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Francis Report might be useful (by mentioning the Francis Report I'm not trying to scare you, just it's awareness of improvement and you'll see why when you read summaries!). You'll find extra reading to do once you've started on reading lists and in things you'll come across in placement.

Things people tend to wish they knew before starting:
- each year is split into modules. A module is worth a certain number of "credits" and you do 120 credits a year (so some modules may be worth more weight than others... or all the same) Your lecturer for one module may not be the same for another therefore may not know what's going on with another module. You have to pass every module to pass each year and the degree.
- Get yourself familiar with both physical library and eLibrary as soon as you get access. I found myself doing loads of reading while on public transport to various places.
- get your head around the referencing system - getting this right adds points to an assignment grade, getting it wrong deducts points and creates a higher risk of being accused of plagiarism.
- Where you get your placements is dependant upon which hospitals, community areas and private healthcare providers the university has links with (anywhere that tells you it's based solely upon your address is lying. Hopefully Southampton hasn't lied.). If you don't have your own transport, make sure you know what public transport is like for placement areas.
- If you admit to the university that you have your own car, or even having a full driving licence, there's a higher risk of you moving round different areas, which is brilliant for finding out how different hospitals work but really not great for getting your face known at a particular trust. (I do know people who got sent to a few different hospitals and community areas because they had a car, whereas the most I travelled was 20 mins bus journey for one spoke placement and stayed in accommodation on the Isle of Man for another 3 week spoke placement and the rest was a 20 min walk).
- any form of support isn't a hindrance - it really is a help! This includes people in your class, mentors and practice education team on placement, lecturers and study support people at uni etc.
- when on placement, get the HCAs on your side. This helps when qualified as well as as a student - remember that you're the doctor's eyes & ears on the ward and your HCAs are yours.
- you'll get some similar placements to your friends and some different. Pool both similar and different experiences and knowledge. You'll then make use of this once qualified.
- as a nurse, there's silly amounts of opportunities. Use your own experiences to figure out what areas you like (or, in my case, don't like!) and friends' experiences for things that might sound interesting.
- nowhere and nobody cares where you did your nursing degree. The NMC only care that you've passed a course accredited by them, employers only care that you can prove you're registered with the NMC and have passed your nursing degree. There's that many opportunities that the world really is your oyster.
- Each year gets harder in terms of academic work and placement expectations. It requires hard work, but a lot of students also put way too much pressure on themselves (I did that as a student and sometimes do now qualified!). Make use of support systems.

Sorry to bombard you with so much but it's just things I've come across that may help. Have been qualified 2 years so feel free to ask questions.
That's extra long Emily for you but I agree with it like and that's most people problem wanting to be super prepared for there nursing courses which is not really necessary like you said but reading up the on antonony & pyshology will give her some help but the real training only starts when eventually start the university course as nothing will prepare you for it unlike the real life situations. Xx. I got a eye opener when I started my midwifing dispite what I read and was told on nursing from people like.
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