sweetescobar
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So, I understand that part of each antibody molecule in the cell surface membranes of these cells, forms a glycoprotein receptor that combines with one type of antigen. Is this glycoprotein receptor the antibody receptor (please refer to the files below)? And is this what combines to antigens? Or are they released into the blood and then do so?
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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Good morning!! I see you were burning some midnight oil - you postyed this Q at 1 am - take it easy - try out studying early morning when everyone is sleeping [so peace & quiet] and you are freshh and alert after your night's sleep - works for most of my students.

I think you youngsters at A level are having a hard time cos with the mind-blowing advances in biology/medicine, your books, in trying to simplify matters, introduce a lot of vists to confused.com and even errors.

The points to understand about humoral immunity mediated by B cells are:-

  • B cells form the humoral arm of adaptive immunity [the latter takes over when an actual "invasion" of our bodies starts [innate immunity is a background series of processes that are always active/present]
  • When an antigen enters our system, special lymphocytes called recognition cells [which include Langerhan's cells - google it!] with these so-called "glycoprotein receptors" [in your attached pics] on their surface "recognize" the specific antigen that has a complementary structure to this surface receptor, so that the precisely correct/specific B lymphocytes proliferate profusely to generate a massive population of, ultimately, plasma cells that have the capacity to synthesize the SPECIFIC ANTIBODY against the particular antigen.
  • These plasma cells have a structure precisely geared to synthesize antibodies ------ so what is their structure? Go on ---- you can work it out - ok take it step by step - what are antibodies chemically? -- yes, you are getting there - they are proteins.




Ok, which parts of cells synthesize proteins? - yes you got it - spell it out - oc ER - so these cells have rich ER with numerous ribosomes. Also making chemical bonds needs energy so................................ it's on the tip of your tongue - .......


......well done! - they have many mitochondria. Easy peasy, yeah?

All these identical plasma cells produce the same identical antibody [called monoclonal - mono = one].

So to come back to your Q and simplify things, the "antibody" on the surface of the cell is only there FOR RECOGNITION purposes - the main antibodies are produced later.

Happy now? Ok you are reading this in your dreams, but wakie wakie! - your mum is waiting with the frying pan with sizzling sausages!

Be safe!
M.
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sweetescobar
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To be honest I just like working at night, but thanks for the advice, and the explanation. Much appreciated.
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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No hassle and thanks for the rep!
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