dannyshiers
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Hi,
I'm currently 19 years old and do not have any A Levels, as I had to drop out of college due to very ill health when I enrolled in 2018.
I got all 9s at GCSE and am looking to continue my education journey.

I like the prospect of being a Lawyer, or somewhere within the law-politics landscape.

I currently work full time so am looking for distanced learning course(s).
I am torn between starting 3 A Levels or starting an Access to HE Diploma. Both can be done online, it's just a question of which carries more weight. I would most likely do Politics, Law and ? at A Level or an Access to HE Diploma in Law.

I would like to go to a top 10 university in London to do an LLB, most likely, so was wondering if you had any advice as to whether an Access to HE Diploma would be enough to get me into UCL or QMUL? I would like to enrol by January 2022, with a view to starting in September 2022.

I am aware that schemes exist in large companies that take on A Level Leavers and you can study a degree alongside one of those positions. How common are they? Is that a possibility?

Any advice would be appreciated. What do you think I should do?
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
Hi,
I'm currently 19 years old and do not have any A Levels, as I had to drop out of college due to very ill health when I enrolled in 2018.
I got all 9s at GCSE and am looking to continue my education journey.

I like the prospect of being a Lawyer, or somewhere within the law-politics landscape.

I currently work full time so am looking for distanced learning course(s).
I am torn between starting 3 A Levels or starting an Access to HE Diploma. Both can be done online, it's just a question of which carries more weight. I would most likely do Politics, Law and ? at A Level or an Access to HE Diploma in Law.

I would like to go to a top 10 university in London to do an LLB, most likely, so was wondering if you had any advice as to whether an Access to HE Diploma would be enough to get me into UCL or QMUL? I would like to enrol by January 2022, with a view to starting in September 2022.

I am aware that schemes exist in large companies that take on A Level Leavers and you can study a degree alongside one of those positions. How common are they? Is that a possibility?

Any advice would be appreciated. What do you think I should do?
Most universities accept Access courses. Ring the universities explain the position and ask them.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
Hi,
I'm currently 19 years old and do not have any A Levels, as I had to drop out of college due to very ill health when I enrolled in 2018.
I got all 9s at GCSE and am looking to continue my education journey.

I like the prospect of being a Lawyer, or somewhere within the law-politics landscape.

I currently work full time so am looking for distanced learning course(s).
I am torn between starting 3 A Levels or starting an Access to HE Diploma. Both can be done online, it's just a question of which carries more weight. I would most likely do Politics, Law and ? at A Level or an Access to HE Diploma in Law.

I would like to go to a top 10 university in London to do an LLB, most likely, so was wondering if you had any advice as to whether an Access to HE Diploma
would be enough to get me into UCL or QMUL? I would like to enrol by January 2022, with a view to starting in September 2022.

I am aware that schemes exist in large companies that take on A Level Leavers and you can study a degree alongside one of those positions. How common are they? Is that a possibility?

Any advice would be appreciated. What do you think I should do?
Most unis do accept Access course - however at your age you could also consider A levels. UCL and QMUL both do accept Access courses. This is what they require:

UCL: Pass in Access to HE Diploma, with a minimum of 36 credits at Distinction and 9 credits at Merit, all from Level 3 units.
QMUL: The minimum academic requirement is to achieve 60 credits overall, with 45 credits at Level 3, all of which must be at Distinction. (The School of Law may specify particular Level 3 subjects in which we require a Distinction.) Typically, successful candidates are aged 21 and above at the start of the Access programme.

You would be young to start an Access course at 19 and some top unis have a preference for A levels students it seems. I think in your shoes I would go down the A level route but it's a hard decision.
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dannyshiers
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Most unis do accept Access course - however at your age you could also consider A levels. UCL and QMUL both do accept Access courses. This is what they require:

UCL: Pass in Access to HE Diploma, with a minimum of 36 credits at Distinction and 9 credits at Merit, all from Level 3 units.
QMUL: The minimum academic requirement is to achieve 60 credits overall, with 45 credits at Level 3, all of which must be at Distinction. (The School of Law may specify particular Level 3 subjects in which we require a Distinction.) Typically, successful candidates are aged 21 and above at the start of the Access programme.

You would be young to start an Access course at 19 and some top unis have a preference for A levels students it seems. I think in your shoes I would go down the A level route but it's a hard decision.
Thanks for your advice.
It is a difficult one, I suppose it's similar to the BTEC argument; they aren't strictly 'below' the level of A Levels, but perception for them isn't the same.

I think A Levels are most likely the way to go. Whether they should or not, they carry a bit more weight.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
Thanks for your advice.
It is a difficult one, I suppose it's similar to the BTEC argument; they aren't strictly 'below' the level of A Levels, but perception for them isn't the same.

I think A Levels are most likely the way to go. Whether they should or not, they carry a bit more weight.
Yes that's what I think deep down. If you look at the stats, not many of the intake into Law degrees at top unis have Access to HE. Of course that might be because not many Access people apply.

You have excellent GCSEs which is always going to be a good predictor of ability but oveall, I think A levels would be safer. Maybe try emailing the unis directly to ask if they have a preference?
Johnny ~ may have an opinion
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dannyshiers
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Yes that's what I think deep down. If you look at the stats, not many of the intake into Law degrees at top unis have Access to HE. Of course that might be because not many Access people apply.

You have excellent GCSEs which is always going to be a good predictor of ability but oveall, I think A levels would be safer. Maybe try emailing the unis directly to ask if they have a preference?
Johnny ~ may have an opinion
Yeah, I think so.

Another one is what to do post A Level.

There's the uni route and apprenticeship route, but I'm struggling to make sense of things.
If I went to Uni for 3 years and did an LLB, I could get a Graduate Solicitor Apprenticeship, start on a decent wage and have my SQEs done during that time too.
However, there is the option, as an A Level leaver, to do a Solicitor Degree Apprenticeship, lasting 6 years, in which I would gain an LLB and SQEs, but on less pay. I suppose it depends on what my view of student debt is.

What's the common route? Is one safer or more appropriate than the other? Or is it just down to preference and ability?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
Yeah, I think so.

Another one is what to do post A Level.

There's the uni route and apprenticeship route, but I'm struggling to make sense of things.
If I went to Uni for 3 years and did an LLB, I could get a Graduate Solicitor Apprenticeship, start on a decent wage and have my SQEs done during that time too.
However, there is the option, as an A Level leaver, to do a Solicitor Degree Apprenticeship, lasting 6 years, in which I would gain an LLB and SQEs, but on less pay. I suppose it depends on what my view of student debt is.

What's the common route? Is one safer or more appropriate than the other? Or is it just down to preference and ability?
The uni route is much more common...I don't think there are many solicitor apprenticeships around. Far more common to do a degree followed by the SQE exams
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by harrysbar)
The uni route is much more common...I don't think there are many solicitor apprenticeships around. Far more common to do a degree followed by the SQE exams
I have had previous correspondence with UCL previously over Law. Someone on here had claimed that the Law Tutor had claimed they were accepting people on courses without the required GCSE Maths grade that was shown as a requirement. What they eventually came back with was that they didnt accept people without GCSE Maths normally but for students who had left school and were mature students they had accepted people without GCSE Maths. I think in your circumstances you need to speak to the uni and get clarification. Access courses are 1 year courses whereas A levels are usually 2 years so if the universities accept Access courses it is better for you. I got the impression from UCL they are keen on people applying for Law with an access course but you need to check it out.
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McGinger
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
I suppose it's similar to the BTEC argument; they aren't strictly 'below' the level of A Levels, but perception for them isn't the same.
If Universities say they accept Access to HE for Law, then they do. Universities are not actually as prejudiced against 'other than A levels' as applicants think. If they state that they will accept X qualification with Y grades then they have not made that decision lightly, and they will consider such applicants alongside conventional A level school leavers with no prejudice. Most Universities are keen to have mature learners and 'restarters' - contact each Admissions office for advice.
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Suniya.m05
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(Original post by dannyshiers)
Hi,
I'm currently 19 years old and do not have any A Levels, as I had to drop out of college due to very ill health when I enrolled in 2018.
I got all 9s at GCSE and am looking to continue my education journey.

I like the prospect of being a Lawyer, or somewhere within the law-politics landscape.

I currently work full time so am looking for distanced learning course(s).
I am torn between starting 3 A Levels or starting an Access to HE Diploma. Both can be done online, it's just a question of which carries more weight. I would most likely do Politics, Law and ? at A Level or an Access to HE Diploma in Law.

I would like to go to a top 10 university in London to do an LLB, most likely, so was wondering if you had any advice as to whether an Access to HE Diploma would be enough to get me into UCL or QMUL? I would like to enrol by January 2022, with a view to starting in September 2022.

I am aware that schemes exist in large companies that take on A Level Leavers and you can study a degree alongside one of those positions. How common are they? Is that a possibility?

Any advice would be appreciated. What do you think I should do?
I’m in the same position and have chosen to choose the Access route starting in September. I chose it because I prefer having lots of assignments and 1/2 exams to get a perfect grade rather than a large exam at the end of A Levels. Also, I’ll get to uni a year quicker. Unis don’t discriminate with access courses. I honestly believes it shows that you strongly want to pursue law as you are not following the usual A Level route and are doing a more specific course. You also have more skills as a ‘mature’ that is juggling work and school which looks great on you.

I’m going to apply to LSE, KCL, UCL, QMUL & Westminster. Will also need to take the LNAT. All of them accept Access courses.

Oxford requires all distinctions + LNAT

LSE requires 30 distinctions, rest merits + LNAT

UCL requires 28 distinctions, rest merits + LNAT

KCL requires 39 distinctions, rest merits + LNAT

QMUL all distinctions + no LNAT
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