Do UCAS predicted grades get inflated?

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bellamybug
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I've heard of a few people from years ago get given predicted grades that are quite a bit higher than what they actually got in Year 12 exams. I understand that some people will get given grades a bit higher than what they got in the exam, but I've heard of people get Cs and Ds in Year 12 exams go onto get predicted 3 As. Does this sort of thing still happen? Seems pretty unfair.
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agameofchxss
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(Original post by bellamybug)
I've heard of a few people from years ago get given predicted grades that are quite a bit higher than what they actually got in Year 12 exams. I understand that some people will get given grades a bit higher than what they got in the exam, but I've heard of people get Cs and Ds in Year 12 exams go onto get predicted 3 As. Does this sort of thing still happen? Seems pretty unfair.
I've not seen it happen that drastically, at least at my college. Initially I was predicted 3 A's, but I asked my Law teacher if she could raise my Law grade to an A* for UCAS and she did, but only because I was able to show her that I achieved that more than an A in first year, so her predicting me lower than what I was actually achieving was unfair. But totally agree with you, it's not fair for teachers to do it as drastically as you said; firstly because another student who's actually achieving the A's may lose a uni place to someone who had their grades inflated, and secondly because if that student then misses all their uni offers because they don't make the grades needed for the courses they were wrongly allowed to apply to, it's just cruel.

I can't imagine it happens unless there's serious extenuating circumstances (i.e. if you're at a college that only use L6 End Of Years to determine predicted grades, and you do poorly only in those exams because of illness or a death etc.), but even in those case the inflation should be backed up with evidence to justify why they've been predicted that grade.
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SyedN
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When I was in college our predicted grades were based on whatever we got in the June mocks in Year 12, and nothing you said could change that so if you got a B in that mock you were going to be predicted a B for your Year 13 result.

I did hear about another college in my city that used to inflate grade really badly. One student I knew from that college got a D in year 12 with their average grade being a C for the entire year yet they still got predicted AAA for their year 13 results.
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by agameofchxss)
I've not seen it happen that drastically, at least at my college. Initially I was predicted 3 A's, but I asked my Law teacher if she could raise my Law grade to an A* for UCAS and she did, but only because I was able to show her that I achieved that more than an A in first year, so her predicting me lower than what I was actually achieving was unfair. But totally agree with you, it's not fair for teachers to do it as drastically as you said; firstly because another student who's actually achieving the A's may lose a uni place to someone who had their grades inflated, and secondly because if that student then misses all their uni offers because they don't make the grades needed for the courses they were wrongly allowed to apply to, it's just cruel.

I can't imagine it happens unless there's serious extenuating circumstances (i.e. if you're at a college that only use L6 End Of Years to determine predicted grades, and you do poorly only in those exams because of illness or a death etc.), but even in those case the inflation should be backed up with evidence to justify why they've been predicted that grade.
75% of students dont reach their predicted grades so clearly they are inflated.
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Hellllpppp
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My predicted grades were 2 grades lower (overall) than my year 12 exams until I asked one of my teachers to increase theirs. My friend on the other hand got her grades put up to As from B-D grades as she was applying to medicine.
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Ahmed 002
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(Original post by agameofchxss)
I've not seen it happen that drastically, at least at my college. Initially I was predicted 3 A's, but I asked my Law teacher if she could raise my Law grade to an A* for UCAS and she did, but only because I was able to show her that I achieved that more than an A in first year, so her predicting me lower than what I was actually achieving was unfair. But totally agree with you, it's not fair for teachers to do it as drastically as you said; firstly because another student who's actually achieving the A's may lose a uni place to someone who had their grades inflated, and secondly because if that student then misses all their uni offers because they don't make the grades needed for the courses they were wrongly allowed to apply to, it's just cruel.

I can't imagine it happens unless there's serious extenuating circumstances (i.e. if you're at a college that only use L6 End Of Years to determine predicted grades, and you do poorly only in those exams because of illness or a death etc.), but even in those case the inflation should be backed up with evidence to justify why they've been predicted that grade.
Hi , As i will be doing A level maths PRIVATELY. I was wondering about my UCAS application. The UCAS application should be submitted in january, whereas i will be taking the exams in may or june and eventually get the results in August. So how in the world will i mention A level maths in my application as i will not even have a predicted grade or anything? and lets assume that i dont which is most likely going to happen, will it affect my application for a uni? i will appreciate any help
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PQ
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(Original post by Ahmed 002)
Hi , As i will be doing A level maths PRIVATELY. I was wondering about my UCAS application. The UCAS application should be submitted in january, whereas i will be taking the exams in may or june and eventually get the results in August. So how in the world will i mention A level maths in my application as i will not even have a predicted grade or anything? and lets assume that i dont which is most likely going to happen, will it affect my application for a uni? i will appreciate any help
This has been explained on your other thread. List the exam centre, add the qualification as pending, speak to your referee about your predictions and if they’re unable to provide a prediction speak to your universities.
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bellamybug
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(Original post by Ahmed 002)
Hi , As i will be doing A level maths PRIVATELY. I was wondering about my UCAS application. The UCAS application should be submitted in january, whereas i will be taking the exams in may or june and eventually get the results in August. So how in the world will i mention A level maths in my application as i will not even have a predicted grade or anything? and lets assume that i dont which is most likely going to happen, will it affect my application for a uni? i will appreciate any help
I'm self-studying AS Further Maths and I will be mentioning it on my personal statement. Know that if you are studying something independently you almost certainly won't be given an offer with that required, though it can happen if you are going for competitive courses. I'm going to liaise with different universities about it but the most likely outcome is it will simply strengthen my application and if I get a good grade in the AS then it might get me over the line if I don't fulfil a conditional offer. Always a good thing to have though and universities do take it seriously.
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bellamybug
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(Original post by agameofchxss)
I've not seen it happen that drastically, at least at my college. Initially I was predicted 3 A's, but I asked my Law teacher if she could raise my Law grade to an A* for UCAS and she did, but only because I was able to show her that I achieved that more than an A in first year, so her predicting me lower than what I was actually achieving was unfair. But totally agree with you, it's not fair for teachers to do it as drastically as you said; firstly because another student who's actually achieving the A's may lose a uni place to someone who had their grades inflated, and secondly because if that student then misses all their uni offers because they don't make the grades needed for the courses they were wrongly allowed to apply to, it's just cruel.

I can't imagine it happens unless there's serious extenuating circumstances (i.e. if you're at a college that only use L6 End Of Years to determine predicted grades, and you do poorly only in those exams because of illness or a death etc.), but even in those case the inflation should be backed up with evidence to justify why they've been predicted that grade.
Yeah, I'm not so sure. I'd imagine that universities will probably be aware of this and just hand out more conditional offers. The predicted grades at my school were based on how previous years did so they'd be pretty accurate, but of course I cannot speak for other schools.
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