14t
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i don’t get it? if that’s what you need to become a _____ psychologist, therapist ect then surely it’s worth it?
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lauren-hall
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I did a degree and masters and I don't regret it at all I absolutely loved it! Ueah it's hard and some bits aren't as interesting but it's definitely worth it!
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14t
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(Original post by lauren-hall)
I did a degree and masters and I don't regret it at all I absolutely loved it! Ueah it's hard and some bits aren't as interesting but it's definitely worth it!
that’s amazing to hear! what’re you doing as a career?
& if i got a B/C in psych at alevel do you think i’d struggle?
ty in advance ahahah
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SirNoodles
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From what I've read/heard, the problem with psychology degrees is apparently that there are far more psychology graduates than psychology jobs. If you were to put in the work to maximise your uni experience and degree outcome I don't see why you'd end up "regretting" your degree in case that's what you're worrying about.
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artful_lounger
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I don't think everyone regrets it - I think maybe students who went into the degree without realistic expectations of it might have regretted it. The key things to be aware of are that most professional psychologist roles require a fair bit of further training (e.g. a DClinPsych for clinical psychology) and are very competitive to get into. Non-psychology specific roles have no preference what degree you did (and the stats background of a psych course might be useful for some roles) but do care a lot about what relevant work experience/internships/etc you gained during your degree.

Students who just go into the degree, spend 3 years taking exams, and then graduate without having done any real work (i.e. outside of like retail/service jobs worked during the degree) will be in worse position in terms of employability than someone who did get relevant experience during their degree. This latter point is true of any degree but, perhaps psychology tends to attract people who don't realise this/realise it too late (perhaps because they had aimed to become a professional psychologist of some variety then discovered the length of time and competition ratios meant it was unrealistic for them).

In any event provided one goes into the degree with realistic expectations, and manage those expectations over the course (e.g. depending on your results across the degree, what experience you are/aren't able to get) I don't think it's likely to be a point of regret. Assuming, of course, the student does have an actual interest in the subject!
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StrawberryDreams
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Definitely don't regret my Psych degree - though I don't use it in my day to day life and career, the course was really interesting!
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Wiggly
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I graduated with a 2:1 two years ago and I've barely mentioned it since.

It's interesting, but it would have been better to read some books about it in spare time and instead chose a course with an actual specialty. In the most part, psychology is too vague to be useful. A lot of people go into it knowing that they probably won't pursue extra training in psychology because of how long it takes and how slim the prospects are anyway, but they think it'll still be OK to do the degree because they'll still be able to do random graduate schemes or that simply having the degree will make them more employable.


...But psychology as a degree is so vague that it can barely help compete against others outside in the real world. It may show that you're able to work to deadlines and know a bit about healthcare, but that's pretty much it to a potential employer; three years reduced to a few lines. You can get those three lines from any other course, plus you can get a better chance of attaining an actual career with a different course that actually specializes in something.

It really is the last thing I mention when being interviewed or even telling people about myself now; there are so many better things.
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14t
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I don't think everyone regrets it - I think maybe students who went into the degree without realistic expectations of it might have regretted it. The key things to be aware of are that most professional psychologist roles require a fair bit of further training (e.g. a DClinPsych for clinical psychology) and are very competitive to get into. Non-psychology specific roles have no preference what degree you did (and the stats background of a psych course might be useful for some roles) but do care a lot about what relevant work experience/internships/etc you gained during your degree.

Students who just go into the degree, spend 3 years taking exams, and then graduate without having done any real work (i.e. outside of like retail/service jobs worked during the degree) will be in worse position in terms of employability than someone who did get relevant experience during their degree. This latter point is true of any degree but, perhaps psychology tends to attract people who don't realise this/realise it too late (perhaps because they had aimed to become a professional psychologist of some variety then discovered the length of time and competition ratios meant it was unrealistic for them).

In any event provided one goes into the degree with realistic expectations, and manage those expectations over the course (e.g. depending on your results across the degree, what experience you are/aren't able to get) I don't think it's likely to be a point of regret. Assuming, of course, the student does have an actual interest in the subject!
thanks! i guess it’s very popular degree and a lot of people choose it without having any idea what they want to do WITH the degree
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14t
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(Original post by Wiggly)
I graduated with a 2:1 two years ago and I've barely mentioned it since.

It's interesting, but it would have been better to read some books about it in spare time and instead chose a course with an actual specialty. In the most part, psychology is too vague to be useful. A lot of people go into it knowing that they probably won't pursue extra training in psychology because of how long it takes and how slim the prospects are anyway, but they think it'll still be OK to do the degree because they'll still be able to do random graduate schemes or that simply having the degree will make them more employable.


...But psychology as a degree is so vague that it can barely help compete against others outside in the real world. It may show that you're able to work to deadlines and know a bit about healthcare, but that's pretty much it to a potential employer; three years reduced to a few lines. You can get those three lines from any other course, plus you can get a better chance of attaining an actual career with a different course that actually specializes in something.

It really is the last thing I mention when being interviewed or even telling people about myself now; there are so many better things.
if you could go back, what would you choose?
because i want to go into counselling psychology so there’s not really any other degree option
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Chicken.M.
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Maybe because psychology is a pseudo science and contains a lot of BS lmao.
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JamesManc
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I’m usually quite embarrassed that I have a psychology degree.
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Lord Asriel
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I certainly don't regret doing mine.

It is competitive to pursue a career in psychology, but the competition is only apparent when the degree is complete rather than before. Getting onto a psychology degree is relatively easy, and many have expectations of the degree thinking it analagous to something like medicine. When those aspirations don't come to fruition they can often be very loud and vocal about their disappointment, which makes it appear that everyone regrets the degree.
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Bexjw
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I don't know anyone who's regretted it. My best friend has always pushed for more people to consider Psychology - she's a Consultant Psychologist within the NHS, very respected in her role and loving it! She was recently educating me on the Psychology conversion course which has taken my interest.
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bones-mccoy
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I think it largely stems from people not really understanding just how much work and further training you have to do before being able to practice as an actual psychologist. It's not one of those things where you do your undergrad, get a bit of work experience, get the perfect job and you're done, it takes years of dedication and study to a very high level, funding qualifications yourself in some instances. A lot of people graduate from a psychology degree, start applying for assistant psychologist roles straightaway but become confused and disheartened when they aren't offered positions, or even interviews. There's hundreds of graduates applying for the same roles so you need X amount of years experience in a very relevant role in order to make yourself stand out. The key is to get experience before you've even graduated, even voluntary stuff looks great - building on your skills, giving insight - and is so useful when it comes to applying for paid roles in the future.

I didn't do a psychology degree, I did a conversion course and then a masters and I definitely understand why people are so frustrated. My friends on the MSc all had decent jobs beforehand but getting the experience required to secure psychology roles in the right setting often means volunteering for free or taking a pay cut, so it can be a strain financially as well.
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