bil0068300
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im going to uni in september to study classical civilisation which i've always been interested in. i've never really had the chance to study it or anything and im in a gc for the course, people seem to know so much more than me. I was wondering if people had any recommendations for ways to learn or get some more foundation knowledge of the subject, any recommendations at all, books/podcasts/ blogs/youtube channels anything at all would be appreciated.
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Holley Wakeling
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hi, I'm in year 12 studying classics a-level. we look at literature and art, as well as religion from ancient greece. If you're really interested try and read the odyssey, Iliad, or aeneid in tranlation or take a look at Susan Woodford's book on greek art. There's a good youtube channel we watch as a class callled runshawclassics where she goes through the art work we have from the board. I'm sure you won't be held back if you don't know anything though as classics isn't really taught in most places
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becausethenight
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Mary Beard’s books are quite fun introductions, and there lots of Classics-y documentaries on the BBC. The Imperium plays are quite good too but obviously fictionalised.

As above reading texts in translation is a good idea but make sure you get good translations and maybe a text guide as well, as the Iliad especially can be quite hard to access. Iliad, Odyssey and Aeneid are the golden trilogy of Classical literature so you could do a lot worse than having read all three, and of course anything else you’re interested in. You could also ask your university if they have a reading list or indicative course content you can get started on.
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artful_lounger
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Are you going to be studying either classical language? If so it might be worthwhile to familiarise yourself with some basics of formal grammar (so you know what a subject and object of a sentence is, what prepositions and participles are etc; this website: http://wpwt.soton.ac.uk/notes/grammar.htm might be helpful for that - it's written for people who would be studying old/middle English but the concepts apply to Greek and Latin as well, and the terminology is the same as far as I can tell for Greek/Latin language learning), and if you are going to be studying Greek specifically familiarising yourself with the alphabet might also be useful.

Otherwise reading whatever interests you would be a good idea, as suggested above. As well as reading secondary/tertiary sources on the period (which can be helpful in getting an overview of things, especially for things like ancient history I gather), it might be helpful to read some of the original texts in translation. Perseus (perseus.tufts.edu) has pretty much all the major texts available online in translation (albeit they are public domain translations so can be a bit old school in style due to being...well, old ). They also have the original versions of the texts (usually the standard editions of them) as well, although if you don't have a language background that won't be useful to you....yet
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bil0068300
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(Original post by Holley Wakeling)
hi, I'm in year 12 studying classics a-level. we look at literature and art, as well as religion from ancient greece. If you're really interested try and read the odyssey, Iliad, or aeneid in tranlation or take a look at Susan Woodford's book on greek art. There's a good youtube channel we watch as a class callled runshawclassics where she goes through the art work we have from the board. I'm sure you won't be held back if you don't know anything though as classics isn't really taught in most places
thank you so much! ill definitely check out the youtube channel and ive purchased the emily wilson translation of the odyssey hopefully ill start it soon once ive gotten over the intimidation factor of it haha x
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bil0068300
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(Original post by becausethenight)
Mary Beard’s books are quite fun introductions, and there lots of Classics-y documentaries on the BBC. The Imperium plays are quite good too but obviously fictionalised.

As above reading texts in translation is a good idea but make sure you get good translations and maybe a text guide as well, as the Iliad especially can be quite hard to access. Iliad, Odyssey and Aeneid are the golden trilogy of Classical literature so you could do a lot worse than having read all three, and of course anything else you’re interested in. You could also ask your university if they have a reading list or indicative course content you can get started on.
oooooo okay! ive watched a few mary beard things and managed to find her book on pompeii in a charity shop! plays are so great for me too because im taking drama as well so ill check them out for sure thank you so much on the advice!
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bil0068300
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Are you going to be studying either classical language? If so it might be worthwhile to familiarise yourself with some basics of formal grammar (so you know what a subject and object of a sentence is, what prepositions and participles are etc; this website: http://wpwt.soton.ac.uk/notes/grammar.htm might be helpful for that - it's written for people who would be studying old/middle English but the concepts apply to Greek and Latin as well, and the terminology is the same as far as I can tell for Greek/Latin language learning), and if you are going to be studying Greek specifically familiarising yourself with the alphabet might also be useful.

Otherwise reading whatever interests you would be a good idea, as suggested above. As well as reading secondary/tertiary sources on the period (which can be helpful in getting an overview of things, especially for things like ancient history I gather), it might be helpful to read some of the original texts in translation. Perseus (perseus.tufts.edu) has pretty much all the major texts available online in translation (albeit they are public domain translations so can be a bit old school in style due to being...well, old ). They also have the original versions of the texts (usually the standard editions of them) as well, although if you don't have a language background that won't be useful to you....yet
its not compulsory but i really want to try learning latin or ancient greek im just awful at languages so ill 100% check out that website im going to need as much help as i can get haha thank you so much i really appreciatw it!!
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becausethenight
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(Original post by bil0068300)
oooooo okay! ive watched a few mary beard things and managed to find her book on pompeii in a charity shop! plays are so great for me too because im taking drama as well so ill check them out for sure thank you so much on the advice!
:goodluck:
There are some good online Latin for beginners courses too, or you could try following a GCSE course.
I would reccomend starting with Latin personally - Greek is harder (according to general opinion) and it will help to have a good grasp of grammar.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Are you going to be studying either classical language? If so it might be worthwhile to familiarise yourself with some basics of formal grammar (so you know what a subject and object of a sentence is, what prepositions and participles are etc; this website: http://wpwt.soton.ac.uk/notes/grammar.htm might be helpful for that - it's written for people who would be studying old/middle English but the concepts apply to Greek and Latin as well, and the terminology is the same as far as I can tell for Greek/Latin language learning), and if you are going to be studying Greek specifically familiarising yourself with the alphabet might also be useful.

Otherwise reading whatever interests you would be a good idea, as suggested above. As well as reading secondary/tertiary sources on the period (which can be helpful in getting an overview of things, especially for things like ancient history I gather), it might be helpful to read some of the original texts in translation. Perseus (perseus.tufts.edu) has pretty much all the major texts available online in translation (albeit they are public domain translations so can be a bit old school in style due to being...well, old ). They also have the original versions of the texts (usually the standard editions of them) as well, although if you don't have a language background that won't be useful to you....yet
Reccomending Perseus to beginners? So hardcore :lol:
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