mathperson
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I used to use TSR regularly back in 2009/10 while I was at the University of Sheffield studying maths.

I won't go into the pros and cons of Sheffield university unless somebody has specific questions.
I would prefer to offer my opinions on whether it was actually worth going to university.

I now own my own business and frankly, for me, it wasn't worth going to university.

After university I went into accounting.
It would have been better for me to go into accounting after I finished sixth form and study the AAT/ACCA qualifications rather than a degree.
I would have made faster progress in my career.

As a business owner, my degree hasn't helped me whatsoever.

Sure, it's positive to have good mathematical intuition, but I feel this was already well developed after I had completed my A-levels.

I'm not trying to put anybody off of doing a degree. Everybody's circumstances are different and some paths may require a degree.
I guess I'm simply saying that you should have a specific reason why you would like to do a degree: it should be part of a long-term plan, rather than the 'natural next step' after college.

I hope somebody finds this short post useful.
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Chicken.M.
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You literally need a degree to do certain things. For example I want to go teach English in Japan with their 'Jet Programme' but I can't because you need a degree. I'm going back to Uni to get a degree so I have options like that in the future. (I went to university before but dropped out due to extenuating circumstances).

My dad is always telling me how his career has been limited by not having a degree as well (design engineer). He couldn't apply to certain positions in the company because a degree was required.

But obviously if your plan is to be an entrepeneur then formal education is a huge waste of time and money. It's 5+ years (Alevels + University) that could have gone towards building your business instead. All the information you need is on the internet or in books.

Degrees are literally just for the piece of paper at the end that you can show employers.
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sabana
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(Original post by mathperson)
I used to use TSR regularly back in 2009/10 while I was at the University of Sheffield studying maths.

I won't go into the pros and cons of Sheffield university unless somebody has specific questions.
I would prefer to offer my opinions on whether it was actually worth going to university.

I now own my own business and frankly, for me, it wasn't worth going to university.

After university I went into accounting.
It would have been better for me to go into accounting after I finished sixth form and study the AAT/ACCA qualifications rather than a degree.
I would have made faster progress in my career.

As a business owner, my degree hasn't helped me whatsoever.

Sure, it's positive to have good mathematical intuition, but I feel this was already well developed after I had completed my A-levels.

I'm not trying to put anybody off of doing a degree. Everybody's circumstances are different and some paths may require a degree.
I guess I'm simply saying that you should have a specific reason why you would like to do a degree: it should be part of a long-term plan, rather than the 'natural next step' after college.

I hope somebody finds this short post useful.
I feel exactly the same as you. I studied maths too and went into accounting but would have preferred to do this as an apprenticeship as its a lot quicker to qualify. Its just my dad preferred me to do a degree. What sort of business do you run?
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o_reo
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hi in September I am starting an accounting and finance degree hopefully at lse if I get the grades and Im hoping to get a professional qualification probably acca and then planning to work in finance.

would you recommend an alternative approach would be better as I am still undecided as to whether I should go to university
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mathperson
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(Original post by o_reo)
hi in September I am starting an accounting and finance degree hopefully at lse if I get the grades and Im hoping to get a professional qualification probably acca and then planning to work in finance.

would you recommend an alternative approach would be better as I am still undecided as to whether I should go to university
If you do an accounting degree, I believe this would allow you to bypass the AAT courses and go straight to ACCA, so it may be worth doing by all means

You won't be able to become a chartered accountant without experience working in industry because of the experience component of the qualification.

Doing an accounting/finance degree should be good for your career, in my view.
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route255
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I thought my degree ( Construction, Surveying) would be put me in great stead for the industry. I done the college then two years at uni. Lots of theory but I should of tried harder to find a firm to do the degree part time. Experience is everything over the degree, struggled to get a position after Uni with no experience. So I regret not looking for a trainee position or degree apprenticeship. Need to be a radical shake up of full time vocational degrees.
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mathperson
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(Original post by route255)
I thought my degree ( Construction, Surveying) would be put me in great stead for the industry. I done the college then two years at uni. Lots of theory but I should of tried harder to find a firm to do the degree part time. Experience is everything over the degree, struggled to get a position after Uni with no experience. So I regret not looking for a trainee position or degree apprenticeship. Need to be a radical shake up of full time vocational degrees.
Part of the problem is that students are funnelled down a pipeline of school-college-university without actually being given any time to think about what they actually want long-term, and unfortunately those working in college environments are ill-equipped to have these kinds of discussions with students as they themselves followed this route and more often than not have no experience whatsoever outside of academia/teaching.
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route255
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(Original post by mathperson)
Part of the problem is that students are funnelled down a pipeline of school-college-university without actually being given any time to think about what they actually want long-term, and unfortunately those working in college environments are ill-equipped to have these kinds of discussions with students as they themselves followed this route and more often than not have no experience whatsoever outside of academia/teaching.
I was a more a more mature student and wanted to get degree quicker. A few of my classmates dismissed the idea of part time saying it takes longer you will be in the money quicker in a job!

My course didn't get cover contracts and BIM so know learning about that in my own time after I graduated!
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mathperson
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(Original post by route255)
I was a more a more mature student and wanted to get degree quicker. A few of my classmates dismissed the idea of part time saying it takes longer you will be in the money quicker in a job!

My course didn't get cover contracts and BIM so know learning about that in my own time after I graduated!
I definitely agree with the comment you made in your previous post: experience is everything over a degree.
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username3962008
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(Original post by mathperson)
I used to use TSR regularly back in 2009/10 while I was at the University of Sheffield studying maths.

I won't go into the pros and cons of Sheffield university unless somebody has specific questions.
I would prefer to offer my opinions on whether it was actually worth going to university.

I now own my own business and frankly, for me, it wasn't worth going to university.

After university I went into accounting.
It would have been better for me to go into accounting after I finished sixth form and study the AAT/ACCA qualifications rather than a degree.
I would have made faster progress in my career.

As a business owner, my degree hasn't helped me whatsoever.

Sure, it's positive to have good mathematical intuition, but I feel this was already well developed after I had completed my A-levels.

I'm not trying to put anybody off of doing a degree. Everybody's circumstances are different and some paths may require a degree.
I guess I'm simply saying that you should have a specific reason why you would like to do a degree: it should be part of a long-term plan, rather than the 'natural next step' after college.

I hope somebody finds this short post useful.
Thanks for sharing your experience. Personally, from my own experience being in first and second year, I don't think it is worth it but I will make the most of my time here. My degree has been cut short in a pandemic and I wonder if I would have felt any different. Had to choose between UEA and York St John university. Not saying there is anything wrong with ysj, but I do wonder what life would have been like at the other uni. Do you have any regrets about where you went?
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mathperson
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(Original post by Rosessta3rs7)
Thanks for sharing your experience. Personally, from my own experience being in first and second year, I don't think it is worth it but I will make the most of my time here. My degree has been cut short in a pandemic and I wonder if I would have felt any different. Had to choose between UEA and York St John university. Not saying there is anything wrong with ysj, but I do wonder what life would have been like at the other uni. Do you have any regrets about where you went?
Interesting, thanks for sharing.
I do have regrets about going to The University of Sheffield. I'll list them out below.

1. The people in charge of the student's union have no commercial sense whatsoever. Rather than approach a wholesaler to supply the student union shop, they buy items at full price from the COOP and then sell them at a mark-up in the shop. Consequently it is probably the most expensive student's union in the country.

2. The maths course requires you to study too much - I'll explain what I mean...
6 10 credit modules per semester is just too much. Most other universities require 3 20 credit modules per semester. Either that or a module with comparable content volume would be worth 20 or even 30 credits at another university - I've done my research on this.
If you're looking to be stressed out by the amount of work involved, study maths at Sheffield!

3. Student accommodation is incredibly expensive. Renting a house is cheaper.

4. On the open days you'll be sold on the idea that the Information Commons (the main library) is the best thing since sliced bread.
It is good, but in reality it is far too small - during exam periods especially you will be very lucky if you can find a work station.
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faraday99
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I done a masters degree in electrical engineering and have been on the dole for 3.5 years with over 150 job applications rejected/ignored so no it wasnt worth it. My first engineering job paid near minimum wage and i didnt get any training either, i was just given data entry jobs in excel half the time. If i went back i would rather have done an apprenticeship as an electrician
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mathperson
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(Original post by faraday99)
I done a masters degree in electrical engineering and have been on the dole for 3.5 years with over 150 job applications rejected/ignored so no it wasnt worth it. My first engineering job paid near minimum wage and i didnt get any training either, i was just given data entry jobs in excel half the time. If i went back i would rather have done an apprenticeship as an electrician
20/20 hindsight is a wonderful thing.
If I could go back, I would have still aimed to get a degree however I would have applied to the OU.
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sabana
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(Original post by mathperson)
20/20 hindsight is a wonderful thing.
If I could go back, I would have still aimed to get a degree however I would have applied to the OU.
Just out of interest. What would you have studied if you went back? The same degree or a different one?
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sabana
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(Original post by faraday99)
I done a masters degree in electrical engineering and have been on the dole for 3.5 years with over 150 job applications rejected/ignored so no it wasnt worth it. My first engineering job paid near minimum wage and i didnt get any training either, i was just given data entry jobs in excel half the time. If i went back i would rather have done an apprenticeship as an electrician
I feel like we are sold a lie when we start university. Yes there are jobs for grads but their is so much competition in the grad world so only a few actually make it into their profession.
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mathperson
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(Original post by sabana)
Just out of interest. What would you have studied if you went back? The same degree or a different one?
I would have still studied maths, though with the OU rather than at Sheffield.

Students are funnelled down the school-college-university route, and completely taken in by the universities marketing efforts.
The OU is an exceptional organisation and not many people realise that you can do masters and even PhDs with them.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by sabana)
I feel like we are sold a lie when we start university. Yes there are jobs for grads but their is so much competition in the grad world so only a few actually make it into their profession.
I've seen loads of posts over the years from 17/18 year olds who have absolutely been sold a lie about university. I don't think anything like so many now as a few years ago. The worst thing is that the person who believes that getting a degree is an easy pathway to well paid work doenst understand the steps they should be taking while at university to improve their chances.
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mathperson
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I've seen loads of posts over the years from 17/18 year olds who have absolutely been sold a lie about university. I don't think anything like so many now as a few years ago. The worst thing is that the person who believes that getting a degree is an easy pathway to well paid work doenst understand the steps they should be taking while at university to improve their chances.
Yes, would be university students are absolutely sold a lie. Several, in fact.

The first lie they're sold is that some universities are better than others. I can assure you that am employer will not care what university you went to. They will look at the subject you studied and the classification you achieved.

The issue we have here is that college teachers don't know anything else. They went down the university route themselves and after university they started teaching in a school or college where the sole focus is pushing people along this pipeline.
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Thestudent107SWC
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OMG, I am in the right place rn. So as a Year 12 student who is stressing over their future I am completely confused whether university is for me. I feel like experience is better and am considering an apprenticeship but then the whole family and friends situation comes in where they all have to give their opinions on whether my decisions on my life choices are good or not. Idk how to explain. I feel like a degree will give me a good base for a career but then it may also be a waste of time and money. On top of that I don't have a clear view of what i want to pursue but in simple words am following in the footsteps of people surronding me because I do not want to be looked down upon. ( I am not totally dismissing the idea of uni but I am currently stuck)
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mathperson
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(Original post by Thestudent107SWC)
OMG, I am in the right place rn. So as a Year 12 student who is stressing over their future I am completely confused whether university is for me. I feel like experience is better and am considering an apprenticeship but then the whole family and friends situation comes in where they all have to give their opinions on whether my decisions on my life choices are good or not. Idk how to explain. I feel like a degree will give me a good base for a career but then it may also be a waste of time and money. On top of that I don't have a clear view of what i want to pursue but in simple words am following in the footsteps of people surronding me because I do not want to be looked down upon. ( I am not totally dismissing the idea of uni but I am currently stuck)
Tell us a little more about your situation:
what subject would you study at university?
what apprenticeship would you like?
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