Anonymous #1
#1
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Hello there,
I need to take the SAT (no essay) within 14 months, and I need to score more than 1450.
The problem here is that I don't know where to start 🙂💔
Hellllppp me!!
may God reward you well.
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Zuzuuuu
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You have plenty of time. I'm sure you can aim more than that. Solve so many SATs. Practice as much as possible. It could be easy for you if you were in the British education system.
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artful_lounger
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As above, just work through past papers/question banks/etc. College Board regularly publish a big SAT prep book which has a fair number of practice questions in it as I recall, and it wasn't that expensive when I bought it way back when. They also had a practice exam on their website at the time; not sure if this is still there.

The main difficulty is getting used to the style of the test; the score really measures your ability to take the SAT test format, not any particular knowledge really, as the only presupposed knowledge is in the math section and it's just GCSE level material. But the questions are quite weirdly phrased and the negative marking multiple choice question format is probably unfamiliar if you are used to UK style exams.
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ry7xsfa
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As above to practice papers and the SAT prep book. You can also use KhanAcademy to help with exam technique and questions. Here is their page giving you information about the exam, but you can easily find revision articles and videos on there too!

(Original post by artful_lounger)
the negative marking multiple choice question format is probably unfamiliar if you are used to UK style exams.
The SAT doesn't employ negative marking. This was the case in the old SAT Subject Tests, but not on the general SAT exam.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
As above to practice papers and the SAT prep book. You can also use KhanAcademy to help with exam technique and questions. Here is their page giving you information about the exam, but you can easily find revision articles and videos on there too!


The SAT doesn't employ negative marking. This was the case in the old SAT Subject Tests, but not on the general SAT exam.
I thought the main one had negative marking when I did it...realising how long ago that was now though, and it might've just been the subject tests anyway
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
I thought the main one had negative marking when I did it...realising how long ago that was now though, and it might've just been the subject tests anyway
The old SAT (scored 600-2400; running from 2005 to January 2016) had negative marking of minus 1/4 point per incorrect answer (the same as the SAT subject tests). If you're interested, here's a page on PrepScholar with a comparison of the two (the SAT essay section is no longer being offered after June 2021).
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
The old SAT (scored 600-2400; running from 2005 to January 2016) had negative marking of minus 1/4 point per incorrect answer (the same as the SAT subject tests). If you're interested, here's a page on PrepScholar with a comparison of the two (the SAT essay section is no longer being offered after June 2021).
Yeah the old one is the one I took (with compulsory essay and writing sections as I recall) - hard to believe that was about 10 years ago now, and that the version I took hasn't even been in use for 5 years! :laugh:

I'll have to remember the differences for future though Also it looks like they've extended some of the topics in the math section so it seems like it might be more comparable to the ACT math section (which had topics like matrices and complex numbers not covered in the SAT back then...unless the ACT has also changed )
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Yeah the old one is the one I took (with compulsory essay and writing sections as I recall) - hard to believe that was about 10 years ago now, and that the version I took hasn't even been in use for 5 years! :laugh:

I'll have to remember the differences for future though Also it looks like they've extended some of the topics in the math section so it seems like it might be more comparable to the ACT math section (which had topics like matrices and complex numbers not covered in the SAT back then...unless the ACT has also changed )
I took the ACT in September 2019 and I don't think it's changed since then. From what I remember all you had to know of complex numbers was that i = \sqrt{-1} and for matrices, you just needed to be able to add matrices and maybe find the det(M) where M is a 2x2 matrix, you may also have been asked a question on scalar multiplication. So not too complex at all.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
I took the ACT in September 2019 and I don't think it's changed since then. From what I remember all you had to know of complex numbers was that i = \sqrt{-1} and for matrices, you just needed to be able to add 2x2 matrices and maybe find the det(M) where M is a 2x2 matrix. So not too complex at all.
Yeah, I think the main thing is in the UK educational system those topics (at least when I was looking at the tests) were all further maths topics so you wouldn't have come across them in any capacity if you weren't taking that normally! Still straightforward enough to learn, at least if you realise you don't need to know any other detail than that
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