Spike protein.

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glassalice
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I don't really understand that science behind this, should I be concerned about the spike protein?
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Dax_Swagg3r
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Concerned about it where?
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Allyson2020
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Is it to do with covid19 the spike protein !!!!

I dealt with ICU cases of covid19 patients over a year and I'm still trying to understand this myself as so complicated like...... Don't know if this helps.

Spike protein functions breaks up into this -
The S protein is a highly glycosylated and large type I transmembrane fusion protein that is made up of 1,000's of amino acids, depending upon the type of virus.

As compared to the M and E proteins that are primarily involved in virus assembly, the S protein plays a crucial role in penetrating host cells and initiating infection.

Notably, the presence of S proteins on the coronaviruses is what gives rise to the spike-shaped protrusions found on their surface.

S proteins of coronaviruses can be divided into two important functional subunits, which include the N-terminal S1 subunit, which forms the globular head of the S protein, and the C-terminal S2 region that forms the stalk of the protein and is directly embedded into the viral envelope.


How S protein allows coronaviruses to enter cells
Once the S1 subunit binds to host cell receptors, two major conformational changes must occur for the S2 subunit to complete the fusion of the virus to the cell membrane. The two components of the S2 subunit that are involved in the coronavirus fusion include heptad repeat (HR) regions one and two, otherwise referred to as HR1 and HR2.

The first conformation otherwise referred to as pre-hairpin, involves the transformation of an unstructured linker within the S2 subunit to become helical. The second conformational change to occur involves the inversion of this subunit’s C-helix to the coil, resulting in the formation of a six-helix bundle.

Once these conformations are completed, the fusion peptide is anchored to the membrane of the host cell to allow the virus to move closer towards the cell membrane and eventually deliver the nucleocapsid to the target cell.
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by glassalice)
I don't really understand that science behind this, should I be concerned about the spike protein?
No. The spike protein is like part of a key. The whole key matches a lock in our body. The spike protein by itself doesn't do anything. It's used in the mRNA vaccine because by itself it's harmless and at the same time it teaches our bodies to protect the lock against keys that have this part. The whole key is the coronavirus in this example. The spike protein is one of those unique parts of a key on the end with those patterns and ridges.
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glassalice
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
Concerned about it where?
In the MRNA covid vaccines.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by glassalice)
In the MRNA covid vaccines.
No shouldn't be worried.
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JaseyB
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(Original post by glassalice)
In the MRNA covid vaccines.
From some of the research I have seen is that 1 of the reasons people are having issues after vaccination is that the spike protien isn't staying in the deltoid muscle and is breaking free and going to different areas of the body. I would say it is mildly concerning, however the immediate overall risk to most people is very low, will it remain low after a period of time ? That is something that is yet to be determined.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by JaseyB)
From some of the research I have seen is that 1 of the reasons people are having issues after vaccination is that the spike protien isn't staying in the deltoid muscle and is breaking free and going to different areas of the body. I would say it is mildly concerning, however the immediate overall risk to most people is very low, will it remain low after a period of time ? That is something that is yet to be determined.
And how does that cause problems? It is expected for that to happen.
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JaseyB
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(Original post by Dax_Swagg3r)
And how does that cause problems? It is expected for that to happen.
No, I am not sure of all the "ins" and "outs" of this process but according to 1 of the people that worked on one of the vaccines the spike protein is supposed to stay stuck on something else and not go roaming about the body.
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Dax_Swagg3r
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(Original post by JaseyB)
No, I am not sure of all the "ins" and "outs" of this process but according to 1 of the people that worked on one of the vaccines the spike protein is supposed to stay stuck on something else and not go roaming about the body.
They have injected a liquid into a localized place it is expected for the thing to go systemic as it diffuses out of the muscle and into the blood stream. Thats the case with literally any intramuscular injection.
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