Good calorie intake?

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Anonymous #1
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hi! So I calculated my new maintenance calories but it seems to vary on what calculator I use... so will I lose/gain or maintain my weight if I eat 1400-1500 calories a day? (previously been on a VLCDfor 6 months and this seems to be an average intake people consume however I've been eating a lot more recently)

I'm female, 5 foot 4 and weigh 7 stone 3 and once or twice a week I cycle 6 miles a day and generally walk for 30-60 minutes a day if weather allows but otherwise sedentary.

thank you so much!!
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JaseyB
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It depends on what you are looking to achieve, if you wish to gain weight or maintain your current weight, anyways I would say that 1400-1500 is way too low given the amount of exercise you do. I would up it a little bit and see how it goes for a while.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by JaseyB)
It depends on what you are looking to achieve, if you wish to gain weight or maintain your current weight, anyways I would say that 1400-1500 is way too low given the amount of exercise you do. I would up it a little bit and see how it goes for a while.
I'm trying to maintain my weight if that helps. Okay I'll definitely see how it goes
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black tea
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I'm assuming you already know that you are underweight so I won't raise that. If you have been on a very low calorie diet, what will most likely happen is that you will initially gain some weight and then your metabolism will adjust to your new intake. If you are doing a lot of exercise (which you are), that is not enough to sustain your weight long-term.
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Surnia
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Be honest; your version of a VLCD is eating 800 calories for 6 months, which you know is unhealthy and unsustainable.

I doubt the results from online calculators vary that much, so what has made you pick around 1400? You certainly won't lose weight by upping your calories if you maintain your current levels of exercise and it will do you no harm if you gain some weight.

However, calories aren't everything; you need to make sure you are eating balanced meals and getting proper nutrition, which you have been missing out on.
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londonmyst
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Are you healthy, eating a balanced diet and happy with your appearance?
If so, you can plan to increase your current daily calorie count by around 250-300 calories without increasing your exercise.
Then gradually introduce a maximum of two daily cheat days a week where you eat your favourite takeaway meal or a high sugar snack/drink.
Maybe with a few daily youtube workouts

I'm 5'1, 26 years old and have been on a lower daily calorie limit for many years.
I'm size 8 and the same weight I was as a 13 year old.
Mostly homecook my meals from scratch, eat twice a day and have never been a gym member.
I make my own bread, chocolate and vegan milks.
Enjoy consuming spirits, beef, chicken, caramel shortbread, pizza and spicy asian foods.
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Surnia
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Are you healthy, eating a balanced diet and happy with your appearance?
Why do you always ask this when it is subjective? Someone who is seriously underweight may be happy with their appearance, or they may be unhappy and trying to lose more.

And this poster is most definitely NOT healthy, nor has she been eating a balanced diet; in her other posts, which has been removed, she has described virtually starving herself for the last 6 months.
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londonmyst
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(Original post by Surnia)
Why do you always ask this when it is subjective? Someone who is seriously underweight may be happy with their appearance, or they may be unhappy and trying to lose more.

And this poster is most definitely NOT healthy, nor has she been eating a balanced diet; in her other posts, which has been removed, she has described virtually starving herself for the last 6 months.
I always ask because the answers generally provide me with a lot of insight into the dieting individual's aims, mindset and lifestyle preferences.
Knowing these things usually helps me to decide whether I can offer any relevant suggestions that will be considered by the dieter plus compatible with their ambitions & lifestyle.

I've spent a lot of time around people consumed by the desire to remain slim for their entire lives and the more hardcore pro-ana fans online & offline.
I can usually recognise their rhetoric and often understand their mindset, lifestyle preferences, future ambitions & worst fears.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by londonmyst)
I'm 5'1, 26 years old and have been on a lower daily calorie limit for many years.
I'm size 8 and the same weight I was as a 13 year old.
To give a different perspective, I am a 5'5 ,30-year-old female eating around 2000 calories a day and I am a size 6 and weigh over a stone less than I did as a 13-year-old.
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black tea
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(Original post by londonmyst)
I've spent a lot of time around people consumed by the desire to remain slim for their entire lives and the more hardcore pro-ana fans online & offline.
Why would somebody claiming to have a healthy relationship with food spend a lot of time on hardcore pro-ana sites?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Surnia)
Be honest; your version of a VLCD is eating 800 calories for 6 months, which you know is unhealthy and unsustainable.

I doubt the results from online calculators vary that much, so what has made you pick around 1400? You certainly won't lose weight by upping your calories if you maintain your current levels of exercise and it will do you no harm if you gain some weight.

However, calories aren't everything; you need to make sure you are eating balanced meals and getting proper nutrition, which you have been missing out on.
I picked 1400 because that's what the calculators were saying?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by black tea)
I'm assuming you already know that you are underweight so I won't raise that. If you have been on a very low calorie diet, what will most likely happen is that you will initially gain some weight and then your metabolism will adjust to your new intake. If you are doing a lot of exercise (which you are), that is not enough to sustain your weight long-term.
Thank you! If I were to remain sedentary and remove the exercise, do you think it would be enough? I've got school work to catch up on and a job to partake in so my exercise will be probably have to be dropped in favour of them. Even now, it's been raining so haven't been able to go out
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Anonymous1502
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(Original post by londonmyst)
Are you healthy, eating a balanced diet and happy with your appearance?
If so, you can plan to increase your current daily calorie count by around 250-300 calories without increasing your exercise.
Then gradually introduce a maximum of two daily cheat days a week where you eat your favourite takeaway meal or a high sugar snack/drink.
Maybe with a few daily youtube workouts

I'm 5'1, 26 years old and have been on a lower daily calorie limit for many years.
I'm size 8 and the same weight I was as a 13 year old.
Mostly homecook my meals from scratch, eat twice a day and have never been a gym member.
I make my own bread, chocolate and vegan milks.
Enjoy consuming spirits, beef, chicken, caramel shortbread, pizza and spicy asian foods.
How does one make their own chocolate?
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londonmyst
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(Original post by Anonymous1502)
How does one make their own chocolate?
The chocolates are mostly made as bars or truffles with DIY starter kits, mini chocolate bar makers and recipe books.
Ingredients tend to include: cacao or cocoa powder, dairy milk or a plant based alternative, coconut oil, vanilla, sugar, maple syrup, nut/cocoa butter and chopped fruit/nuts.

A lot of the specialist chocolatiers stores selling DIY chocolate bar kits include supplies containing common allergens like nuts and dairy products.
There are plenty of chocolate recipe books, youtube homemade chocolate videos and plant based food bloggers that have developed their own vegan substitutes for the most popular chocolates made with animal derived ingredients.

When starting to homemake chocolates I'd recommend these books:
Making Chocolate: From Bean to Bar to S'More by Todd Masonis, Chocolate Make & Mould Your Own Chocolate Bars by Anne Deblois
and Raw Chocolate Treats Healthy Recipes For The Chocolate Lover by Jessica Fenton.
For someone who has been making their own chocolates for a while, I'd recommend these books:
Making Artisan Chocolates by Andrew Garrison Shotts, Guittard chocolate cookbook, Chocolates And Confections: Formula, Theory & Technique for the Artisan Confectioner by Peter Greweling.

Sorry for derailing your thread OP.
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JaseyB
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you! If I were to remain sedentary and remove the exercise, do you think it would be enough? I've got school work to catch up on and a job to partake in so my exercise will be probably have to be dropped in favour of them. Even now, it's been raining so haven't been able to go out
1400 is never enough, most women would need to eat around 1700-2000 just to maintain, eating 1400 unless you were bed ridden isn't going to be enough especially if you exercise and/or goto work.
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black tea
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you! If I were to remain sedentary and remove the exercise, do you think it would be enough? I've got school work to catch up on and a job to partake in so my exercise will be probably have to be dropped in favour of them. Even now, it's been raining so haven't been able to go out
I mean in theory, if you remain completely sedentary, that should be enough. However, no one is completely sedentary so in reality, you will be burning a few hundred calories on top of that by doing day-to-day stuff. Plus exercise is really important for your health and removing it would not be a good thing to do - much better just to increase your intake to accommodate for it.
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Surnia
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I picked 1400 because that's what the calculators were saying?
But you said the calculators varied, so by what range?
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Surnia
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(Original post by londonmyst)
If so, you can plan to increase your current daily calorie count by around 250-300 calories without increasing your exercise.
I thought you waited for an insight before responding, but then you are throwing out figures! An increase of 250 calories puts the OP on 1050 a day, nowhere near enough.
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londonmyst
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(Original post by black tea)
Why would somebody claiming to have a healthy relationship with food spend a lot of time on hardcore pro-ana sites?
Reasons are likely to vary between the individuals.
Academic interests, professionals or their assistants researching for an article/audition/book/role, working as site moderators, friends/family members/volunteers trying to understand why a person or multiple people they know seems to be spending so much time on these sites.
There are also some jailbird adult predators lurking around lurking around half those sites pretending to be teenagers or dealing illegal narcotics as weight loss aids.

Sorry for derailing your thread OP.
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Anonymous #1
#20
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(Original post by Surnia)
But you said the calculators varied, so by what range?
Calculators always said between 1400-1570 calories a day
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