is £656 a lot for your first job?

Watch
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
title
0
reply
RedGiant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Per hour?
0
reply
Moonlight rain
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Yes if you're living with parents and not paying rent
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by RedGiant)
Per hour?
nope, per month
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Moonlight rain)
Yes if you're living with parents and not paying rent
even if I am living with parents, I still have to pay rent, its not up to my parents whether I pay rent, its up to the local council/landlord, but I don’t know how its going to work with me because I am on the kickstart scheme so I am getting universal credit on the side. If it was up to my parents, no one in my house would be paying rent.
Last edited by Anon346775; 1 month ago
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Moonlight rain)
Yes if you're living with parents and not paying rent
If I was to pay rent, how much would I be paying?
0
reply
RedGiant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Anon346775)
nope, per month
How many hours? £656 after tax? Obviously it depends on how many hours you are working. It's easier just to quote the hourly wage.
0
reply
goggleyed
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
how many hours are you working??
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by RedGiant)
How many hours? £656 after tax? Obviously it depends on how many hours you are working. It's easier just to quote the hourly wage.
I get £6.56 per hour and work 25 hours per week. In a month I would get £656. Not sure if this answers your question.
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by goggleyed)
how many hours are you working??
5 hours per day, 25 hours per week.
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by RedGiant)
How many hours? £656 after tax? Obviously it depends on how many hours you are working. It's easier just to quote the hourly wage.
I don’t pay rent right now and in my previous post to Moonlight rain I meant if I was to have a proper job I would have to pay rent, right now my local council haven’t asked me to pay rent and I am not sure how it works given I am on the Kickstart scheme and getting universal credit on the side. I don’t get taxed.
0
reply
RedGiant
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Anon346775)
I get £6.56 per hour and work 25 hours per week. In a month I would get £656. Not sure if this answers your question.
It's not much, although I don't know the context (e.g. the minimum wage for your age, region, etc). I'm not sure what you're talking about with the "kickstart scheme" or paying rent to the council, more context is needed. £656 probably isn't enough to live off unless you also receive benefits.
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by RedGiant)
It's not much, although I don't know the context (e.g. the minimum wage for your age, region, etc). I'm not sure what you're talking about with the "kickstart scheme" or paying rent to the council, more context is needed. £656 probably isn't enough to live off unless you also receive benefits.
I am 20 years old, in London, in the UK and minimum wage for my age would be £6.56 per hour which is what I am getting now. The Kickstart scheme is a new government funded programme for 16-24 year olds claiming universal credit and at risk of long term unemployment for 6 months at the minimum wage for your age. Right now I am also getting universal credit as well as money from my kickstart scheme job and for every £1 you earn they cut it by 73p or something like that, I am not getting the full amount of £344 anymore but still getting some benefits hence why I think my local council won’t ask me to pay rent.

If £656 isn’t enough to live on (the minimum wage should be enough to live on hence why its called the minimum wage) I thought the job centre give just about enough money to live on (so no savings at all) when you’re on benefits (so majority of people get £344 each month this year on UC) so whats the point of jobs at minimum wage? why do they pay almost double the amount of what you would get when receiving benefits if the job centre/DWP supposedly give enough money to live on (with no savings)?
Last edited by Anon346775; 1 month ago
0
reply
Joleee
Badges: 19
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
i'm guessing you're between the ages of 18-20 and earning the National Minimum Wage of £6.56. in that case, how are you defining 'a lot'? :holmes:
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by Joleee)
i'm guessing you're between the ages of 18-20 and earning the National Minimum Wage of £6.56. in that case, how are you defining 'a lot'? :holmes:
I would think its very little too but my parents and siblings would say thats very good for a work from home job and round about £600 is not less
0
reply
Joleee
Badges: 19
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by Anon346775)
I would think its very little too but my parents and siblings would say thats very good for a work from home job and round about £600 is not less
i mean, i don't know what the average salary is for your job or job-status, so can't tell you if you're underpaid or overpaid, sorry :getmecoat:

but if you're getting minimum wage for your age group, i'd say that would be average for an entry-level position as opposed to 'a lot'. does that help
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Joleee)
i mean, i don't know what the average salary is for your job or job-status, so can't tell you if you're underpaid or overpaid, sorry :getmecoat:

but if you're getting minimum wage for your age group, i'd say that would be average for an entry-level position as opposed to 'a lot'. does that help
well theres no need to insult me 😂 I am only at the beginning of my career. I have experience as a hair dressers cleaning assistant and this was whilst I was at secondary school when we had to go on work experience for a month in KS4, so June 2016- July 2016, GCSEs in 2017, AS level in 2018 and then was a NEET until 2021 and now on the Kickstart Scheme doing an estate assistant job, isn’t what I wanted but went with it because it was a work from home job and travelling is a big issue for me as I can’t travel anywhere outside of my postcode independently, and even to familiar places I need help going places but the DWP believe I am LCW so that means I have to work (in the future meaning now because I was declared LCW in 2019) so that means work from home for me.
0
reply
Anon346775
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Joleee)
i mean, i don't know what the average salary is for your job or job-status, so can't tell you if you're underpaid or overpaid, sorry :getmecoat:

but if you're getting minimum wage for your age group, i'd say that would be average for an entry-level position as opposed to 'a lot'. does that help
I would say its a lot for someone working from home part-time, as its 2 days working, 3 days studying.
Last edited by Anon346775; 1 month ago
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you tempted to change your firm university choice on A-level results day?

Yes, I'll try and go to a uni higher up the league tables (18)
28.57%
Yes, there is a uni that I prefer and I'll fit in better (5)
7.94%
No I am happy with my choice (37)
58.73%
I'm using Clearing when I have my exam results (3)
4.76%

Watched Threads

View All