Rate of reactions help!!!!

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Thesleepystudent
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#1
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#1
So I was asked to decide the best method to use to measure the rate of a reaction for different equations .
However, 2 methods seem the same.
The methods are:
A)collecting and measuring the volume of a gas
B) measuring a change in volume
Isn't the change in volume measured by the release of a gas, in a syringe or a measuring cylinder. if not please explain the difference.
Thanks in advance.
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Purple43Monkey
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Thesleepystudent)
So I was asked to decide the best method to use to measure the rate of a reaction for different equations .
However, 2 methods seem the same.
The methods are:
A)collecting and measuring the volume of a gas
B) measuring a change in volume
Isn't the change in volume measured by the release of a gas, in a syringe or a measuring cylinder. if not please explain the difference.
Thanks in advance.
The various methods for measuring rates of reaction include:
- measuring the volume of gas evolved
- measuring the change in mass of a reaction mixture
- measuring the change in intensity of colour of a reaction mixture (colorimetry)
- measuring the change in concentration of a reactant or product using titration
- measuring the change in pH of a solution
- measuring the change in electrical conductivity of a reaction mixture

The two methods that you mentioned above do seem to be the same, and you are correct that change in volume of a gas is usually measured either using a gas syringe or using a measuring cylinder in water. Perhaps there is a mistake in whatever source you are using? Maybe they mean mass or concentration? You can measure the rate of reaction using the mass lost as gas during a reaction.

I hope this helps somewhat, and please do let me know if you need any more help!
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Thesleepystudent
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#3
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#3
(Original post by Purple43Monkey)
The various methods for measuring rates of reaction include:
- measuring the volume of gas evolved
- measuring the change in mass of a reaction mixture
- measuring the change in intensity of colour of a reaction mixture (colorimetry)
- measuring the change in concentration of a reactant or product using titration
- measuring the change in pH of a solution
- measuring the change in electrical conductivity of a reaction mixture

The two methods that you mentioned above do seem to be the same, and you are correct that change in volume of a gas is usually measured either using a gas syringe or using a measuring cylinder in water. Perhaps there is a mistake in whatever source you are using? Maybe they mean mass or concentration? You can measure the rate of reaction using the mass lost as gas during a reaction.

I hope this helps somewhat, and please do let me know if you need any more help!
Thank you so much for your help.
I did some more research and I think this would be where the total volume changes with time. Would this be a clock reaction, where a precipitate is formed, I'm still uncertain. Yet again, thanks a lot.
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scimus63
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#4
Report 10 months ago
#4
try looking here it may help a bit:

https://www.science-revision.co.uk/r..._reaction.html
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Thesleepystudent
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#5
Report Thread starter 10 months ago
#5
(Original post by scimus63)
try looking here it may help a bit:

https://www.science-revision.co.uk/r..._reaction.html
Thank you, it helped
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