Will my jab definitely be a Pfizer/Moderna one, or is there a chance of AZ (age 21)?

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RJDG14
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I'm 21 years old and was able to book my vaccination on Wednesday via the NHS website at the earliest possible opportunity. I've booked it for the 29th June at my local mass vaccination centre, which was the soonest I could get there. I believe the government have said that under 40s will be given an alternative (Pfizer or Moderna) to the AstraZeneca jab where possible due to a higher risk of clotting and other side effects in younger people from the AZ one, and it says on the NHS website that "If you're under 40, you'll only be shown appointments for the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines" so I'd like to double check here that I'm definitely going to receive one of these and not the AstraZeneca one which everyone I know locally over the age of 40 has had. My dad had a non-vaccine related clot a couple of years back and needed treatment for it, and my great uncle died of a clot a few years ago.

Are the government ensuring that young people are only receiving the Pfizer and Moderna jabs, or are they still allowing places to give the AZ one if it's the only vaccine available at the vaccination centre?
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Stephen Stalker
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(Original post by RJDG14)
I'm 21 years old and was able to book my vaccination on Wednesday via the NHS website at the earliest possible opportunity. I've booked it for the 29th June at my local mass vaccination centre, which was the soonest I could get there. I believe the government have said that under 40s will be given an alternative (Pfizer or Moderna) to the AstraZeneca jab where possible due to a higher risk of clotting and other side effects in younger people from the AZ one, and it says on the NHS website that "If you're under 40, you'll only be shown appointments for the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines" so I'd like to double check here that I'm definitely going to receive one of these and not the AstraZeneca one which everyone I know locally over the age of 40 has had. My dad had a non-vaccine related clot a couple of years back and needed treatment for it, and my great uncle died of a clot a few years ago.

Are the government ensuring that young people are only receiving the Pfizer and Moderna jabs, or are they still allowing places to give the AZ one if it's the only vaccine available at the vaccination centre?
Hi. I applied in exactly the same fashion and had my first jab last week. At my local vaccination center I could hear what people were being given and everyone under 40 were given the pfizer including me, so i can say confidently that as far as I am aware they are going above and beyond to ensure that people are given the correct jab. I hope this helps.
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RJDG14
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(Original post by Stephen Stalker)
Hi. I applied in exactly the same fashion and had my first jab last week. At my local vaccination center I could hear what people were being given and everyone under 40 were given the pfizer including me, so i can say confidently that as far as I am aware they are going above and beyond to ensure that people are given the correct jab. I hope this helps.
Did you have any side effects from the Pfizer jab other than a slightly sore arm for a couple of days? I know that most of the people I know who've been given the AstraZeneca vaccine have had mild flu like symptoms for a couple of days, but I had none of these symptoms after any of the jabs I was given at secondary school.
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Stephen Stalker
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(Original post by RJDG14)
Did you have any side effects from the Pfizer jab other than a slightly sore arm for a couple of days? I know that most of the people I know who've been given the AstraZeneca vaccine have had mild flu like symptoms for a couple of days, but I had none of these symptoms after any of the jabs I was given at secondary school.
I had mild tingling in the area where i had the jag and mild tingling about an hour or so after the jag, but it didn't last very long. I also made sure to get the jag on my right arm as i sleep on my left, it gave me a mild sore shoulder that would have been unxomforable to sleep on. Overall, nothing major to worry about, the pfizer is a mild jag imo.
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imogen28
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You’ll definitely get Pfizer or moderna I’ve had my first dose of Pfizer and had nothing other than the slightly sore arm but I have heard with Pfizer if you do get side effects it’s more likely to be after the second dose, whereas with AstraZeneca it’s more likely you’ll get them after the first dose. I don’t know anyone that’s had more than minor side effects though so it’s nothing to worry about.
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SomeWelshGuy123
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You'll get the Pfzier one, but honestly the AZ one is perfectly safe it's literally a 1 in 100,000 chance of developing a blood clot and something like 1 in a million of it being serious enough to have serious issues.
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DGeorge13
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I know when my friend went they were turning people under 40 away when they only had Astra Zeneca left so I think it’s being taken seriously and you should get the right one
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RJDG14
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It could be the Moderna one as well as the Pfizer one. Both are extremely similar based on everything I've read, and both were also US developed. My appointment is at 12:20PM a week from today so hopefully they'll have a stock of one or the other.

I think I've heard that some GPs have been giving vaccines to their patients. These would probably be the AstraZeneca ones, with the Pfizer/Moderna ones being given at either hospitals or large vaccination centres (alongside the AstraZeneca one for older patients).
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RJDG14
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My jab should be tomorrow. I'm probably unlikely to know whether it will be the Pfizer or Moderna jab until I get to the vaccination centre, but both appear to be very similar in terms of their side effects and effectiveness, as well as how they work. I think there have been more Pfizer doses in circulation around the UK however I know that a few people have been getting the Moderna one. It appears side-effect wise that relatively few people have any side effects other than a sore arm after their first dose, but that some experience cold-like side effects after their second dose (with the AstraZeneca one side effects are more common after the first dose). The AZ one gives young people about a 1/100000 of developing clots, while the MRNA ones that the UK is now giving to under 40s give young people, males in particular, a relatively similar chance of developing heart inflammations, although more commonly after the second than first dose, from what I've read.

Also, is it possible to ask them to give the vaccine in a certain arm, or do they insist on giving it in whichever arm is closest to them (probably the left by default)? I fooled around with deodorant on my upper left arm about 5 years ago (I was being stupid) and it's caused a scar on a small section of it, which I'm worried they'll comment about or inject the jab into if I get it on my left arm (I have been using scar treatment products for the past few months and it's less visible than it was, but need to keep using them to diminish it almost entirely).
Last edited by RJDG14; 4 weeks ago
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Yousman3009
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Jabs are evil, wouldn’t get them
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black tea
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(Original post by Yousman3009)
Jabs are evil, wouldn’t get them
Are you sure you are a medic?
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Yousman3009
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There are some in my year at medical school that are anti-vaccine so … yeah
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black tea
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(Original post by Yousman3009)
There are some in my year at medical school that are anti-vaccine so … yeah
How did they get into medical school without getting their vaccinations?
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Yousman3009
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Because we have been at home ever since lockdown !
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black tea
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(Original post by Yousman3009)
Because we have been at home ever since lockdown !
But did they not get an occupational health assessment before starting medical school? Is it not mandatory to get certain vaccines before working or studying in a healthcare setting? If they've been fully vaccinated, they are not anti-vaxxers, they are hypocrites :rolleyes:
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Yousman3009
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(Original post by black tea)
But did they not get an occupational health assessment before starting medical school? Is it not mandatory to get certain vaccines before working or studying in a healthcare setting? If they've been fully vaccinated, they are not anti-vaxxers, they are hypocrites :rolleyes:
We got into mediCal school before COVID
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imogen28
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(Original post by RJDG14)
My jab should be tomorrow. I'm probably unlikely to know whether it will be the Pfizer or Moderna jab until I get to the vaccination centre, but both appear to be very similar in terms of their side effects and effectiveness, as well as how they work. I think there have been more Pfizer doses in circulation around the UK however I know that a few people have been getting the Moderna one. It appears side-effect wise that relatively few people have any side effects other than a sore arm after their first dose, but that some experience cold-like side effects after their second dose (with the AstraZeneca one side effects are more common after the first dose). The AZ one gives young people about a 1/100000 of developing clots, while the MRNA ones that the UK is now giving to under 40s give young people, males in particular, a relatively similar chance of developing heart inflammations, although more commonly after the second than first dose, from what I've read.

Also, is it possible to ask them to give the vaccine in a certain arm, or do they insist on giving it in whichever arm is closest to them (probably the left by default)? I fooled around with deodorant on my upper left arm about 5 years ago (I was being stupid) and it's caused a scar on a small section of it, which I'm worried they'll comment about or inject the jab into if I get it on my left arm (I have been using scar treatment products for the past few months and it's less visible than it was, but need to keep using them to diminish it almost entirely).
Yeah I got asked which arm, I’m sure if they didn’t ask a preference you could still ask them to do it in your right arm as it doesn’t make much difference to them
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ROTL94
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(Original post by black tea)
Are you sure you are a medic?
Do you mean to tell me there's a possibility that a guy who made a weird thread in the middle of the night was lying about his identity?
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RJDG14
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(Original post by imogen28)
Yeah I got asked which arm, I’m sure if they didn’t ask a preference you could still ask them to do it in your right arm as it doesn’t make much difference to them
I'll probably just say to them that I tend to sleep on my left arm, which I do.
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Talon
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(Original post by RJDG14)
Also, is it possible to ask them to give the vaccine in a certain arm, or do they insist on giving it in whichever arm is closest to them (probably the left by default)? I fooled around with deodorant on my upper left arm about 5 years ago (I was being stupid) and it's caused a scar on a small section of it, which I'm worried they'll comment about or inject the jab into if I get it on my left arm (I have been using scar treatment products for the past few months and it's less visible than it was, but need to keep using them to diminish it almost entirely).
They should ask you which arm you want it in, as there is a good chance of you getting a sore arm afterwards. I really wouldn't bother about the scarring - these people have seen it all, and your scar is nothing to them. Consider which arm you are more likely to want to use that day, and maybe the next. If you are right handed, you may want to get the injection in your left arm so as to not be inconvenienced when doing certain tasks during the day.

The only other side effect I got was being quite tired afterwards. I solved that with sleep.
Last edited by Talon; 4 weeks ago
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