Doing a Masters just out of interest for the subject?

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issawrap
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Is this uncommon, or stupid? It's not to me, but I just want to know people's opinions.

I'm currently a Philosophy undergraduate and want to do a Psychology MSc conversion just because I like Psychology and to see if it's something I would want to pursue further in terms of further study and careers. If I don't end up pursuing the latter afterwards, would the MSc have been 'stupid' or a waste?

Or is it reason enough that I simply wanted to study Psychology at university level out of interest ?

Hope this makes sense. Thank you!
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issawrap
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Catherine1973
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If you have the money why not! I am considering a law masters following my llb,both done as a mature student for interest rather than I need it for any career.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by issawrap)
Is this uncommon, or stupid? It's not to me, but I just want to know people's opinions.

I'm currently a Philosophy undergraduate and want to do a Psychology MSc conversion just because I like Psychology and to see if it's something I would want to pursue further in terms of further study and careers. If I don't end up pursuing the latter afterwards, would the MSc have been 'stupid' or a waste?

Or is it reason enough that I simply wanted to study Psychology at university level out of interest ?

Hope this makes sense. Thank you!
It's a very expensive way of finding out what you want to do in life. What happens if after the Masters you decide you want to do something else that requires a Masters? How long are you going to spend and how much money do you have to use Masters degrees as the way to decide if you like something?
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bones-mccoy
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You can only use the Masters loan once, so if you do the conversion and decide you'd like to pursue a career in psychology, you'd have to fund a second MSc yourself. All psychology disciplines require further postgraduate study, mostly in the form of masters and doctorates so it's by no means a quick and easy process to become qualified.

There are plenty of other ways to work out whether you'd enjoy studying psychology or not - reading around the subject, free online courses, doing your own research, speaking to people already in the profession. Doing a conversion course is a pretty expensive way to try and make that decision.
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Roasted Potato
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Do it
It's a great way to get experience and find out if you like something
It's also another qualification at higher level so that does count for something wherever you end up!
It's good to have a back up plan!
You may never choose to do a second degree so not using it would be a waste. What would be the point in saving it! And yes uni is expensive but that's why we get loans. And if you choose to do further study later in life hopefully you'll have some savings or a job to support you!
I think the main advice is ensure this is something you want to do by reading around the subject, maybe attend a few free or cheap courses. And if you still want it do it. And if you don't don't
It's your life, do what makes you happy, who are we to say otherwise!
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issawrap
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
If you have the money why not! I am considering a law masters following my llb,both done as a mature student for interest rather than I need it for any career.
I'll be using a loan so that won't be an issue
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issawrap
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
It's a very expensive way of finding out what you want to do in life. What happens if after the Masters you decide you want to do something else that requires a Masters? How long are you going to spend and how much money do you have to use Masters degrees as the way to decide if you like something?
I'll be using a student loan, which isn't a problem for me if we're talking in terms of the way that the loan needs to be paid back.

About if I later decide I want to pursue a different masters but can't, I don't think I will. I've thought about this.
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issawrap
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(Original post by Roasted Potato)
You may never choose to do a second degree so not using it would be a waste. What would be the point in saving it! And yes uni is expensive but that's why we get loans.
Thank you and that's exactly what I'm thinking! If I have the opportunity to pursue a Masters - which regardless what I do with, will be a valuable addition to my CV - with an available loan that isn't difficult to pay back, then why not?
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issawrap
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
You can only use the Masters loan once, so if you do the conversion and decide you'd like to pursue a career in psychology, you'd have to fund a second MSc yourself. All psychology disciplines require further postgraduate study, mostly in the form of masters and doctorates so it's by no means a quick and easy process to become qualified.

There are plenty of other ways to work out whether you'd enjoy studying psychology or not - reading around the subject, free online courses, doing your own research, speaking to people already in the profession. Doing a conversion course is a pretty expensive way to try and make that decision.
I wouldn't need a second MSc. That's not necessary for getting onto a doctorate programme

I'll be using a student loan

As for finding other ways to find out if I want to study psychology, I can't find anything wrong with this method of using a conversion course. Regardless of if I decide to pursue it further, it will be something valuable to add to my CV and can help demonstrate a lot of valuable skills to employers - research, etc.

Another reason I want to do it is because it was one of the two options I was originally deciding between when choosing my undergrad. I went with Philosophy but I remain interested in studying psychology. If I have the opportunity of getting a masters to do so, then I don't see why not?
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issawrap
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
How long are you going to spend
It's only a year
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Final Fantasy
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Waste of money.
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issawrap
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Waste of money.
Experience (especially experience in something that you want to experience) is never a waste of money
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OxFossil
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(Original post by issawrap)
Is this uncommon, or stupid? It's not to me, but I just want to know people's opinions.

I'm currently a Philosophy undergraduate and want to do a Psychology MSc conversion just because I like Psychology and to see if it's something I would want to pursue further in terms of further study and careers. If I don't end up pursuing the latter afterwards, would the MSc have been 'stupid' or a waste?

Or is it reason enough that I simply wanted to study Psychology at university level out of interest ?

Hope this makes sense. Thank you!
Half way through my career, I saw a book on child therapy that somehow seemed to call to me. I'd never done psychology or worked with children before. On the strength of it, I funded myself through a qualification. It wasn't financially the best move, but it lead to a new career that I loved.

Reading your later answers, it seems like you are looking for affirmation for a decision you've already taken! I'd only add - do make sure that the course you choose is really a good fit for your enthusiasm. Do recognise that a non-vocational Masters course may not lead you directly into a professional role in psychology; if you have a definite career path in mind, you might want to consider other options. But a year in an academic department may give you greater opportunities to talk with others in the fields you find especially exciting - make sure you use those opportunities and network like mad. But in any case, please don't believe every educational opportunity must be justified by monetary calculations.
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tenpastnein
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Doing a masters because you're interested in a subject is a much better idea than doing a 'panic' masters. You've got to balance the costs to you both in time and money, absolutely, and seriously think about whether or not you would want to use this skill but being interested in your area of study is absolutely key to enjoying and succeeding in postgraduate study.
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by issawrap)
Experience (especially experience in something that you want to experience) is never a waste of money
Come back and tell me this when you're successfully employed in your chosen career path.
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issawrap
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(Original post by OxFossil)
Half way through my career, I saw a book on child therapy that somehow seemed to call to me. I'd never done psychology or worked with children before. On the strength of it, I funded myself through a qualification. It wasn't financially the best move, but it lead to a new career that I loved.

Reading your later answers, it seems like you are looking for affirmation for a decision you've already taken! I'd only add - do make sure that the course you choose is really a good fit for your enthusiasm. Do recognise that a non-vocational Masters course may not lead you directly into a professional role in psychology; if you have a definite career path in mind, you might want to consider other options. But a year in an academic department may give you greater opportunities to talk with others in the fields you find especially exciting - make sure you use those opportunities and network like mad. But in any case, please don't believe every educational opportunity must be justified by monetary calculations.
Thank you! What is your current career? Are you now working in child therapy?

You are kinda right that I'm just looking for affirmation here. Actually, I mostly just want good enough reasons from people on why I shouldn't do this. If I get that, then I'll begin to change my mind.

What exactly did you mean by the last sentence?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by issawrap)
I wouldn't need a second MSc. That's not necessary for getting onto a doctorate programme

I'll be using a student loan

As for finding other ways to find out if I want to study psychology, I can't find anything wrong with this method of using a conversion course. Regardless of if I decide to pursue it further, it will be something valuable to add to my CV and can help demonstrate a lot of valuable skills to employers - research, etc.

Another reason I want to do it is because it was one of the two options I was originally deciding between when choosing my undergrad. I went with Philosophy but I remain interested in studying psychology. If I have the opportunity of getting a masters to do so, then I don't see why not?
Which doctorate programme would you be applying for?
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issawrap
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Come back and tell me this when you're successfully employed in your chosen career path.
Why is the word experience only relevant to 'career paths' in your mind
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by issawrap)
Why is the word experience only relevant to 'career paths' in your mind
Do what you want. Just don’t come back complaining when you can’t find a job due to lack of commercial experience and unable to pay for your living costs.
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 1 month ago
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