Physics without maths?

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Rabah04
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#1
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#1
Im super worried this year as i want to do physics at university’s such as Edinburgh, strathclyde or glasgow. However i am only doing higher maths in s6. This is because of complications in s2 which led to me being placed in a nat 4 maths class the following year. My question is should i bother applying to these unis or should i use my application spaces for easier unis. If it changes anything i got a B in higher physics and english, and a A at higher chemistry. I only got a C at higher business. Im doing AH physics and chemistry along side higher maths and (crash) higher biology. Thanks!
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artful_lounger
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If AH Maths isn't required you can always apply and should at least be considered, although I think from the wording on Edinburgh's webpage is that they might be a long shot without it.

From what I can tell of the topics in AH Maths, it should be noted though that basically all of these will come up in a physics degree, and most will come up very frequently. So universities may well prefer those with it than without, as even if they teach it to you on the course, those that have done the AH they know can already handle those topics and there isn't the gamble that they might start the degree, struggle with those essential mathematical methods, then need to change course/drop out. Also it looks like while a lot of the topics are FM material for A-level students, some of it is covered in the core A-level Maths, so you might be on a bit of a backfoot compared to them too...

Ultimately though the above is true probably of any physics course, in Scotland or otherwise. So unless you were just not going to apply for physics, there really isn't much point dwelling on it; just apply to the unis which accept the Higher Maths without requiring AH Maths, and hope you get offers from at least two! You have five choices at the end of the day remember, so even if one (or three!) don't make an offer you should be fine still
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 year ago
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Rabah04
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#3
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
If AH Maths isn't required you can always apply and should at least be considered, although I think from the wording on Edinburgh's webpage is that they might be a long shot without it.

From what I can tell of the topics in AH Maths, it should be noted though that basically all of these will come up in a physics degree, and most will come up very frequently. So universities may well prefer those with it than without, as even if they teach it to you on the course, those that have done the AH they know can already handle those topics and there isn't the gamble that they might start the degree, struggle with those essential mathematical methods, then need to change course/drop out. Also it looks like while a lot of the topics are FM material for A-level students, some of it is covered in the core A-level Maths, so you might be on a bit of a backfoot compared to them too...

Ultimately though the above is true probably of any physics course, in Scotland or otherwise. So unless you were just not going to apply for physics, there really isn't much point dwelling on it; just apply to the unis which accept the Higher Maths without requiring AH Maths, and hope you get offers from at least two! You have five choices at the end of the day remember, so even if one (or three!) don't make an offer you should be fine still
Thanks foe the heads up i was just wondering, if i got an A in my highers and advanced highers, would i be able to get into those unis with clearing? Because surely an A at advanced higher physics would be enough to prove that i am able to handle the subject.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rabah04)
Thanks foe the heads up i was just wondering, if i got an A in my highers and advanced highers, would i be able to get into those unis with clearing? Because surely an A at advanced higher physics would be enough to prove that i am able to handle the subject.
Well im not super familiar with SQA curricula but it's worth noting compared to A-level, degree level physics is a lot closer to A-level Maths than A-level Physics. If SQA physics is calculus based then that might be more representative of university level physics though.

If you meet or exceed the standard requirements and the course is in clearing there's a very good chance you'll get an offer for it. However there is no guarantee it will be in clearing for all those courses; as I recall last year not all courses at Edinburgh were in clearing and most that were pretty quickly disappeared in the first day or two after A-level results day.
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Rabah04
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well im not super familiar with SQA curricula but it's worth noting compared to A-level, degree level physics is a lot closer to A-level Maths than A-level Physics. If SQA physics is calculus based then that might be more representative of university level physics though.

If you meet or exceed the standard requirements and the course is in clearing there's a very good chance you'll get an offer for it. However there is no guarantee it will be in clearing for all those courses; as I recall last year not all courses at Edinburgh were in clearing and most that were pretty quickly disappeared in the first day or two after A-level results day.
I dont know anything about A level physics but the first topic of advanced higher physics is calculas. Specifically differentiation and intergration. My friends said that the level it expects from these topics is much harder than higher maths expected, so hopefully that is worth something. I wont lie tho from wjat im hearing and from the entry requirements advanced higher physics seems useless:/
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Rabah04)
I dont know anything about A level physics but the first topic of advanced higher physics is calculas. Specifically differentiation and intergration. My friends said that the level it expects from these topics is much harder than higher maths expected, so hopefully that is worth something. I wont lie tho from wjat im hearing and from the entry requirements advanced higher physics seems useless:/
Well doing calculus based physics is promising, as that's what university level physics is like. A-level Physics is all algebra based, so no calculus is used (except maybe implicitly). In any case, provided AH Maths isn't required you should be able to apply in principle. In terms of preparing for the course, if you do get an offer it might be worth looking at some of the AH Maths topics over the summer before you start the degree (matrices and complex numbers probably being the most important ones). That's quite a ways in the future though so in the meantime just focus on doing well on your current courses and organising your appolication (and writing your personal statement!)
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Rabah04
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#7
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well doing calculus based physics is promising, as that's what university level physics is like. A-level Physics is all algebra based, so no calculus is used (except maybe implicitly). In any case, provided AH Maths isn't required you should be able to apply in principle. In terms of preparing for the course, if you do get an offer it might be worth looking at some of the AH Maths topics over the summer before you start the degree (matrices and complex numbers probably being the most important ones). That's quite a ways in the future though so in the meantime just focus on doing well on your current courses and organising your appolication (and writing your personal statement!)
Will do, thanks
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