Should I study Law just because I believe in justice...?

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foxyeyes
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I hope this doesn't come off as extremely naive and oblivious on my part, but I've been debating if I should pick up law because I strongly believe in justice. I believe I am highly aware of social issues and would like to pursue justice for victims. I have deeply ingrained values of equality and human rights and would love to study international and human rights' law. I don't know if this is an educated reason to choose law. I really wouldn't like to defend people that are obviously guilty of doing horrific acts...Also, getting work experience on almost anything is considerably complicated in my country...

Thanks,
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Joleee
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i would say firstly, what kind of social issues are you interested in(?) and what do you mean by an interest in human rights? you mean human rights law specifically, a la ECHR(?) or would you include rights in property law, rights in contract law, the right to not be unfairly dismissed, rights in divorce law and the right to sue for medical negligence?

if it's human rights law specifically that interests you, well that's only one module and a little bit in your constitutional law module (which you may not be interested in) so very little in studying an LLB. you may find the majority of your mandatory subjects then like EU law, land law, contract law, tort law and equity extremely boring.

also what do you mean by an interest in justice? like, what is justice to you? ngl there is no such thing as justice in the justice system unless you mean justice as fairness as in following a fair procedure and the same procedure for everyone. not sure that's what you mean tho since you said in the op you would never defend someone who was 'obviously guilty of horrific acts', except those people have the right to a fair trial under human rights law too.

fyi you don't really study 'justice' in an LLB aside from a theory of justice in jurisprudence; you just memorise points of law, apply them to case scenarios and argue a plausible outcome (what crime would this person be charged with for instance) and learn how to make arguments with zero holes. if i were you i would visit the law study forum and take a look at some of the questions students need help with. also find law textbooks via google scholar and see if you can see yourself reading that stuff for years (specifically i would try to find something on tort law, equity, contract law, land law and contsitutional law if you can). also read judgments on the Supreme Court website cuz you'll need to read a bunch of those, which are very long and sometimes very boring. personally don't know what modules they study in a politics degree, but maybe take a look at that as well as it might suit you more on the 'social issues' side. jmho
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foxyeyes
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(Original post by Joleee)
i would say firstly, what kind of social issues are you interested in(?) and what do you mean by an interest in human rights? you mean human rights law specifically, a la ECHR(?) or would you include rights in property law, rights in contract law, the right to not be unfairly dismissed, rights in divorce law and the right to sue for medical negligence?

if it's human rights law specifically that interests you, well that's only one module and a little bit in your constitutional law module (which you may not be interested in) so very little in studying an LLB. you may find the majority of your mandatory subjects then like EU law, land law, contract law, tort law and equity extremely boring.

also what do you mean by an interest in justice? like, what is justice to you? ngl there is no such thing as justice in the justice system unless you mean justice as fairness as in following a fair procedure and the same procedure for everyone. not sure that's what you mean tho since you said in the op you would never defend someone who was 'obviously guilty of horrific acts', except those people have the right to a fair trial under human rights law too.

fyi you don't really study 'justice' in an LLB aside from a theory of justice in jurisprudence; you just memorise points of law, apply them to case scenarios and argue a plausible outcome (what crime would this person be charged with for instance) and learn how to make arguments with zero holes. if i were you i would visit the law study forum and take a look at some of the questions students need help with. also find law textbooks via google scholar and see if you can see yourself reading that stuff for years (specifically i would try to find something on tort law, equity, contract law, land law and contsitutional law if you can). also read judgments on the Supreme Court website cuz you'll need to read a bunch of those, which are very long and sometimes very boring. personally don't know what modules they study in a politics degree, but maybe take a look at that as well as it might suit you more on the 'social issues' side. jmho
Wow, thanks for replying! You've definitely given me food for thought. If you have any book recommendations on the law profession please tell me as I feel very ignorant regarding this topic.

I'm interested in social issues such as labour rights, racial and gender equality, ecology and environmentalism as well as lgbt+ rights. Yes, ECHR, Charter of UN, IBH seem really appealing to me. The other you mentioned are interesting but I prefer the firstly mentioned tbh. I find all of it appealing but the most interesting and exciting for me is human rights law and constitutional law.

I meant justice in a way where procedure is followed equally and there is no corruption within it, there's no inffluence peddling and less privileged people are given a fair trial...kind of social justice...if it makes any sense.

I wouldn't want to defend someone who has done rlly bad stuff and there's solid evidence about it, being the case almost pure formality(in my eyes...), plus I've read some times the accused confess the act to their lawyer...I wouldn't feel comfy defending someone I know is guilty of doing it.

I'll def look up the politics degree; I will read what you recommended, I've gone through some Supreme Court judgements and they caught my interest, kinda like reading a book and you wanna know what happens next lol.

Anyways thanks for your help. )
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Johnny ~
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You don't need to study law for any of this. You can study literally anything. It sounds like a sociology or political science degree might be more up your street, perhaps with a law module as an elective.
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foxyeyes
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
You don't need to study law for any of this. You can study literally anything. It sounds like a sociology or political science degree might be more up your street, perhaps with a law module as an elective.
Thanks for sharing your opinion, I'll investigate those courses.
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JemimaJ
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Hi

It is great you are so passionate about legal issues but studying law because of that is not something I would personally recommend. I don't know if you have looked into the LLB and what is going to entail but as an ex law student I can tell you it's not as interesting at times as you imagined and you have to push on through that - for me I wanted to study law because of my experiences with it (from having issues with a landlady in rented accommodation and having to face her in court) but when it came to studying things like land law or public law I wanted to run for the hills.

I am now about to start a criminology degree which is more suited to what I am passionate about and I know I can push through the modules I don't particularly look forward to.

Whatever decision you come to I wish you the best because if you find the right course you will absolutely fly, get the wrong one and it will feel like wading through mud.
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hopeful-lawyer
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I agree that you should look into sociology or politics, or something of the sort. Law is not what you think it is; I've just done my first year, and barring a small section of constitutional law, I didn't study anything related to 'justice'. It was mostly technical subjects within civil law!

Law is interesting, and especially within 2nd and 3rd year (particularly the latter) you get choice with module options and you can choose more modules related to social issues, but even then, it's not as much as you may think. At my university, there is one human rights module as an option only in 3rd year!

Long story short, don't fall for the stories that say law students are 'social justice warriors'
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foxyeyes
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(Original post by hopeful-lawyer)
I agree that you should look into sociology or politics, or something of the sort. Law is not what you think it is; I've just done my first year, and barring a small section of constitutional law, I didn't study anything related to 'justice'. It was mostly technical subjects within civil law!

Law is interesting, and especially within 2nd and 3rd year (particularly the latter) you get choice with module options and you can choose more modules related to social issues, but even then, it's not as much as you may think. At my university, there is one human rights module as an option only in 3rd year!

Long story short, don't fall for the stories that say law students are 'social justice warriors'
Thanks for the insight! I will do further research.
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