would you class an estate assistant as a working class job?

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Anon346775
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title. An estate assistant is different to an estate agent. An estate assistant is someone who looks for flats/houses and puts it on a document and sends it to the line manager, an estate agent is someone who actually shows people houses.
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ROTL94
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Why does it matter?
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Anon346775
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(Original post by ROTL94)
Why does it matter?
because I am an estate assistant and its really repetitive and I am considering leaving the job (it was a kickstart scheme job, the kickstart scheme is what the DWP made which are 6 month work placements for those on Universal credit and at risk of long term unemployment) I only took the job offer because it was work from home and I have issues travelling independently and my health is bad as in I have fainting episodes so work from home is best. Pay is not great but better than nothing, minimum wage for my age of £6.56 an hour.
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ROTL94
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(Original post by Anon346775)
because I am an estate assistant and its really repetitive and I am considering leaving the job (it was a kickstart scheme job, the kickstart scheme is what the DWP made which are 6 month work placements for those on Universal credit and at risk of long term unemployment) I only took the job offer because it was work from home and I have issues travelling independently and my health is bad as in I have fainting episodes so work from home is best. Pay is not great but better than nothing, minimum wage for my age of £6.56 an hour.
Ok, but what's any of that got to do with whether or not it's considered a 'working class' profession?
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Anon346775
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(Original post by ROTL94)
Ok, but what's any of that got to do with whether or not it's considered a 'working class' profession?
because I was looking to be an admin assistant and an admin assistant would come under unskilled working class and estate assistant is pretty similar. There are loads of estate jobs out there and I wonder if its because its so easy to get into and in my view, any manual job (any job that doesn’t require a degree) comes under working class. An Estate Assistant and Admin Assistant doesn’t require a degree and of course not everyone goes to university or is supposed to go to university.
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StriderHort
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They both sound like working class jobs? :confused:
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Anon346775
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(Original post by StriderHort)
They both sound like working class jobs? :confused:
I know they are, just wanted someone elses view. I don’t have a degree so can’t expect my first job to be a well paid job can I? or even after a lot of experience, most you get is £9/£10 an hour stuck with manual labour your whole life.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Anon346775)
I know they are, just wanted someone elses view. I don’t have a degree so can’t expect my first job to be a well paid job can I? or even after a lot of experience, most you get is £9/£10 an hour stuck with manual labour your whole life.
Honestly you might need to open your mind a bit IMO, the idea that any job requiring a degree automatically lifts you out the working classes? If only. If you need to go out and work, you're working class IMO.

Plenty of poor people with degrees and little prospects above min wage/piecework, plenty of self made 'manual' people with the millions telling those with degrees what to do. Personally i'm in estate maintenance, v blue collar, but I bet I make more than many graduate per hour, and i'll likely get to make my house buying/retiring choices sooner.
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Anon346775
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(Original post by StriderHort)
Honestly you might need to open your mind a bit IMO, the idea that any job requiring a degree automatically lifts you out the working classes? If only. If you need to go out and work, you're working class IMO.

Plenty of poor people with degrees and little prospects above min wage/piecework, plenty of self made 'manual' people with the millions telling those with degrees what to do. Personally i'm in estate maintenance, v blue collar, but I bet I make more than many graduate per hour, and i'll likely get to make my house buying/retiring choices sooner.
well some people aren’t lucky enough to get a job in the career sector they got a degree in, take my sister who did business and marketing after a BTEC at college, she is working in retail as a cashier in Iceland, now only 2 days a week (and only earns £80) because she has my nephew to look after. My brother in law studied business at uni, he didn’t find a job in that career sector and he went into security and was a security guard, earning K. It largely depends on the degree you do.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Anon346775)
well some people aren’t lucky enough to get a job in the career sector they got a degree in, take my sister who did business and marketing after a BTEC at college, she is working in retail as a cashier in Iceland, now only 2 days a week (and only earns £80) because she has my nephew to look after. My brother in law studied business at uni, he didn’t find a job in that career sector and he went into security and was a security guard, earning K. It largely depends on the degree you do.
The degree is relevant, but it's not the be all and end all imo and in my time i've seen a lot of graduates that, well, just aren't too bright tbh. They're not dumb, but they're nothing to write home about either and have done nothing to elevate their station in any real way and lack the instincts and sharpness to really make something of themselves.

Likewise I know scores of people who have essentially started in blue collar mailrooms, jumped to more white collar admin assistant roles then to a specialised team such as Imaging, Bookkeeping, Discrepancy Audit etc, purely through being good at their jobs and having some ambition (I've done this)
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MaleMan
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(Original post by Anon346775)
because I am an estate assistant and its really repetitive and I am considering leaving the job (it was a kickstart scheme job, the kickstart scheme is what the DWP made which are 6 month work placements for those on Universal credit and at risk of long term unemployment) I only took the job offer because it was work from home and I have issues travelling independently and my health is bad as in I have fainting episodes so work from home is best. Pay is not great but better than nothing, minimum wage for my age of £6.56 an hour.
I'm considering a Kickstart work from home job. Is it bad? Do you get feedback?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Anon346775)
because I was looking to be an admin assistant and an admin assistant would come under unskilled working class and estate assistant is pretty similar. There are loads of estate jobs out there and I wonder if its because its so easy to get into and in my view, any manual job (any job that doesn’t require a degree) comes under working class. An Estate Assistant and Admin Assistant doesn’t require a degree and of course not everyone goes to university or is supposed to go to university.
I wouldn't personally consider either "working class jobs", but that's probably because I would consider that terminology as synonymous with "blue collar jobs", neither of which those roles are (in fact they are by definition white collar jobs as you would normally be based in an office doing officework). Also speaking as someone who has worked in both blue collar and white collar jobs, neither of these necessarily correspond to what would be considered "economic classes" anyway, if for no other reason than the distinction between working and middle class economically has largely eroded over the last 10-15 years, and so they're both now part of a much broader "new working class" imo.

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Also anecdotally although in perhaps "culture" they were working class, when I was working as a blue collar worker in security most of the people I was working with would probably be closer to the old middle class than working class i.e. owned property (sometimes multiple properties), had financial and job security etc. They just worked in a job that was (literally) blue collar and shift based. That said, the role in question may have been an exception in the security industry as it was widely acknowledged by my co-workers that they were paid very well for what they actually did compared to other security jobs (which is why most didn't leave the role barring retirement or death...).


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Anon346775
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(Original post by MaleMan)
I'm considering a Kickstart work from home job. Is it bad? Do you get feedback?
Its not bad, just gets you started off. The wage is better than the starting wage of an apprentice as they get paid less than minimum wage to start off with. You do get feedback yes, and most jobs on the Kickstart are easy in difficulty.
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DiddyDec
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They aren't unskilled jobs at all, having done both. An estates assistant depending on the actual "estate" can be an integral part of the team with vast knowledge on the portfolio.
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