What is Keele’s timetable like for computer science and should I live in halls?

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Anonymous #1
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Hi there I’m just wondering what the average computer science first year time table is like. I know they haven’t been release but does anyone have experience of how many set hours and what times e.g.

I say this as I haven’t got much time to make up my mind whether to commute to keele or stop in accommodation.

My commute is around 40 mins which I may struggle with but if a lot of it is online it may be worth it. Also Have bad social anxiety so I’m not sure on halls.

I did go for accommodation last year but didn’t like it due to my anxiety and all the online learning which led me to defer. But I don’t know whether to try it again as the last year I’ve been really lonely as I’ve never had friends and I think commuting will not get me out my shell again
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artful_lounger
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Honestly a 40 minute commute to uni is a pretty long time. What will you do when you have a day where you only have a single, one hour lecture on campus? Spend and hour and a half travelling to go to that one lecture? Decide "it's not worth it" and skip it? Likewise if you have two lectures but they're 5 hours apart - what are you going to do in that situation? You'll be stuck waiting around campus with potentially not much to do (which I always found stressful), or making multiple trips which will be very time consuming and expensive. It's just not a great situation really.

In terms of social anxiety the uni may be able to arrange help with that through their wellbeing/counselling section. I had CBT through a uni I was previously studying for social anxiety, for example, which was helpful. It's easier to access these support programmes if you're based on or near the campus though just because the times may be in the early evening or something for example, and so it's nicer to be able to go back and chill out in your room in halls for a few hours then go to anything in that vein than just have to wander around campus or sit in the library waiting.

Also as you note, commuting will most likely make you less likely to engage with others on your course and on campus and may limit some opportunities to get to know people due to needing to leave to start your commute home. Also you will of course not get to know anyone you live with in halls.
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Keele Postgraduate
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi there I’m just wondering what the average computer science first year time table is like. I know they haven’t been release but does anyone have experience of how many set hours and what times e.g.

I say this as I haven’t got much time to make up my mind whether to commute to keele or stop in accommodation.

My commute is around 40 mins which I may struggle with but if a lot of it is online it may be worth it. Also Have bad social anxiety so I’m not sure on halls.

I did go for accommodation last year but didn’t like it due to my anxiety and all the online learning which led me to defer. But I don’t know whether to try it again as the last year I’ve been really lonely as I’ve never had friends and I think commuting will not get me out my shell again
Hi!

You might find it helpful to talk to Thijs, one of our current Computer Science students on UniBuddy (https://api.unibuddy.co/og/keele-uni...Position=share). Thijs is currently in third year but can tell you about his experience of the first year classes and timetable, give you an idea of the hours you'll spend on campus etc.

In terms of commuting, I'm a PhD student and I currently commute 45 mins - 1 hour to get into Keele, depending on traffic. Honestly, whilst it's okay for PhD (because I don't have taught classes so can work from home a lot of the time), I wouldn't be wanting to do that sort of commute for undergraduate study.

This is primarily because as an undergraduate you'll have a lot more taught classes - so you'll probably be commuting most weekdays (which, given the traffic on the M6 and A500 can be zero fun at peak times - and highly stressful). But also because when I look back to my own undergraduate experience, the social side was a huge part of the university experience and that's much harder to access if you're not living on/near campus - not impossible, of course (there are social events that take place during the day on campus), but definitely much more difficult.

As a mature PhD student, this doesn't bother me too much - I have family and friends from pre-PG study, plus my social life is geared more towards 'coffee and cake' with fellow PG students these days, so I socialise during study breaks when I'm working on campus. But looking back to my life as an undergraduate, I think I'd have struggled to make friends or really immerse myself in university without engaging with the social aspect that comes from living on/near campus.

I suffer from a anxiety condition and social anxiety too - so I totally get your concerns about living in halls or shared accommodation. But, speaking from my own experience, the benefits do outweigh the risks - you can make some fantastic friends in halls, plus you can join and engage with the range of clubs and societies, the campus sports centre and sport activities, the library facilities. There really is something for everyone at Keele - it's not just nights out in the SU (although there are certainly those) but wildlife walks, Student Eats gardening sessions, craft activities, film nights, board game evenings etc. So even if you don't find your people in halls or on your course, there's lots of different ways to meet people with similar interests - and activities and events during Freshers to help with that too.

We have a range of accommodation at Keele (https://www.keele.ac.uk/discover/accommodation/) to suit a range of styles and budgets (so you can have a flat with a smaller group of housemates and en-suite facilities, or more traditional halls if you'd feel more comfortable meeting a variety of people). Thjis or one of our other student buddies would be happy to tell you more I'm sure, plus you can also email the accommodation team to discuss your individual accommodation needs at [email protected]. There's also off campus student accommodation if you think living in halls would be too much, and the accommodation team have a register of regulated local landlords (https://www.keele.ac.uk/discover/acc...vingoffcampus/) if you want to look for a flat or bedsit that gives you your own space but allows you to be that bit closer.

As artful_lounger has said, we do also have a range of wellbeing and support services at Keele, from counselling to peer support, online support services, mentoring, and on campus health services. You can find out more at https://www.keele.ac.uk/students/lif...eandwellbeing/, and can contact the Student Services team via https://www.keele.ac.uk/students/studentservices/. I've had contact with them myself and have found them to be really helpful so please do get in touch and get some support put in place for your arrival at Keele.

Hope that's helpful but if you do have any questions, please let me know. We hope to welcome you to Keele soon!

Amy Louise
Last edited by Keele Postgraduate; 2 months ago
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