freyaw123
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I am interested in taking a Sociology degree as an undergraduate but am being told by others that it may not be the best choice? It is a subject that I am passionate about but at the same time I want to take something that will guarantee me a career in the future. Any advice or opinions would be appreciated
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lol.yolo
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What do you want to do as a career? Sociology is considered by many a 'softer' degree as it doesn't have a clear career path like other degrees such as Law, however sociology graduates still end up working in a variety of sectors. Ultimately the best degree choice is on that will open doors for you career-wise, and also one you will enjoy and be motivated to work towards
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by lol.yolo)
What do you want to do as a career? Sociology is considered by many a 'softer' degree as it doesn't have a clear career path like other degrees such as Law, however sociology graduates still end up working in a variety of sectors. Ultimately the best degree choice is on that will open doors for you career-wise, and also one you will enjoy and be motivated to work towards
Most degrees aren't tied to any one career sector - in fact even law is not necessarily bound to the legal sector, and plenty of law grads don't pursue careers in law (and quite a few try but are not able to break into the sector, at least not initially). Employers don't have lists of "soft" vs "hard" degrees and don't really care about your degree subject unless it's required to work in a given sector due to specific content or legal/accreditation requirements (e.g. most STEM fields and healthcare roles). So your advice is generally wrong.

(Original post by freyaw123)
I am interested in taking a Sociology degree as an undergraduate but am being told by others that it may not be the best choice? It is a subject that I am passionate about but at the same time I want to take something that will guarantee me a career in the future. Any advice or opinions would be appreciated
By and large employers don't care that much about your degree subject unless you're applying to a role which requires a specific background e.g. engineering roles requiring an engineering degree, numerate roles requiring some degree with a fair bit of mathematical work in it, economic service roles requiring a degree with a substantial amount of economics etc. However outside of STEM roles (which are obviously not a consideration anyway for you), the roles requiring some specific background are far fewer than those that accept grads from any degree background; these latter roles make up the bulk of grad scheme roles and civil service positions etc. The key thing is getting relevant work experience, and as much of it as possible, during your degree. This makes far more difference than what subject you study.
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lol.yolo
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Most degrees aren't tied to any one career sector - in fact even law is not necessarily bound to the legal sector, and plenty of law grads don't pursue careers in law (and quite a few try but are not able to break into the sector, at least not initially). Employers don't have lists of "soft" vs "hard" degrees and don't really care about your degree subject unless it's required to work in a given sector due to specific content or legal/accreditation requirements (e.g. most STEM fields and healthcare roles). So your advice is generally wrong.
I'm aware law degree ≠ career in law, I was referring more to the fact that to have a career in law you most likely require a law degree, and students who want a law career apply to study law, so there is more of a 'funnelling' of career aspirations compared to other subjects.
Ive heard plenty refer to sociology as a soft subject, different circles of people perhaps:dontknow:
While its true many employers don't mind what course you studied (they value experience over schooling), the degree choice could equip OP with skills, experience and job/internship opportunities that are better suited towards certain sectors
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by lol.yolo)
I'm aware law degree ≠ career in law, I was referring more to the fact that to have a career in law you most likely require a law degree, and students who want a law career apply to study law, so there is more of a 'funnelling' of career aspirations compared to other subjects.
Ive heard plenty refer to sociology as a soft subject, different circles of people perhaps:dontknow:
While its true many employers don't mind what course you studied (they value experience over schooling), the degree choice could equip OP with skills, experience and job/internship opportunities that are better suited towards certain sectors
You don't need a law degree to go into a legal career as a solicitor now (and never needed it for the legal executive route or paralegal roles I believe), although it does potentially save you money on a prep course for the SQE. For the barrister route a law degree is required but there's no preference for this to be an LLB vs GDL.

Most grad schemes don't specify any degree is required and usually have people with a very varied range of academic backgrounds. Work experience will make more difference than a degree, and most degrees instill the same general transferable skills as each other in terms of relevant skills for working.
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McGinger
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All social science degrees teach you How to Think - and at a far higher level than school-leavers.
Those are the skills that employers value, which is why you see job ads for 'graduate - any discipline'.

Sociology is not a 'weak degree' whatever you are implying by that - its a highly respected discipline and usually a large academic department at any UK University,

Whilst many Sociology grads do go into relevant areas, especially within the public sector, many do not. Like any degree subject you will find graduates in the widest range of jobs possible.

Careers advice from Uni Careers at
Manchester - https://www.socialsciences.mancheste...employability/
York : https://www.york.ac.uk/study/undergr...ology/careers/
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