saharknj
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hi, so ive decided to do my english language gcse speech on the underfunding of the NHS and sort of how the uk govt have dealt with covid19. (topical) its literally next week so i need to get a move on haha, but topics i was thinking of including:
- Clement Attlee's introduction of the NHS in post-war Britain
- Adam Kay's books (ex-obstetrician; left medicine)
- Nurse who cared for Boris Johnson resigns over ‘lack of respect’ for NHS workers
- Tory austerity in the past 11 years
- Mixed messages + 100k deaths

anyone have anymore ideas??
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mnot
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(Original post by saharknj)
hi, so ive decided to do my english language gcse speech on the underfunding of the NHS and sort of how the uk govt have dealt with covid19. (topical) its literally next week so i need to get a move on haha, but topics i was thinking of including:
- Clement Attlee's introduction of the NHS in post-war Britain
- Adam Kay's books (ex-obstetrician; left medicine)
- Nurse who cared for Boris Johnson resigns over ‘lack of respect’ for NHS workers
- Tory austerity in the past 11 years
- Mixed messages + 100k deaths

anyone have anymore ideas??
The NHS spending relative to GDP grew from 3% in the 50s to around 7.5% under Browns final years, today NHS funding still sits in excess of 7% of GDP. Id hardly call that underfunded.

Id listen to the funding is not managed effectively enough, but not underfunded. With the exception of 2009-2010 (just after the recession when GDP dropped significantly), NHS spending from 2010 onwards has been at a greater percentage of GDP then at any point in NHS history.

The government spent around 210bn in 2020. V 150bn in 2019 ( 60bn borrowed to fund support covid burden). and in 2010 the budget was 126bn. 11 years of austerity.
Last edited by mnot; 2 months ago
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JOSH4598
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(Original post by mnot)
The NHS spending relative to GDP grew from 3% in the 50s to around 7.5% under Browns final years, today NHS funding still sits in excess of 7% of GDP. Id hardly call that underfunded.

Id listen to the funding is not managed effectively enough, but not underfunded. With the exception of 2009-2010 (just after the recession when GDP dropped significantly), NHS spending from 2010 onwards has been at a greater percentage of GDP then at any point in NHS history.
I was about to make this very point. The issue the NHS faces is not inadequate funding, but pervasive inefficiency given the government signs off blank cheques whenever the NHS claim they're overstretched.

You could also argue how certain people abuse the NHS too, for example calling out an ambulance for fairly minor health problems or visiting their GP on a near-weekly basis given the fact everything is free at the point of use.

I don't disagree that the NHS is in a fairly dire state, especially on the frontline, but years of mismanagement are more to blame than austerity. When you look at the police service, you'll realise how easy the NHS has had it when it comes to funding. The police have been forced into becoming more efficient, whereas the NHS hasn't.
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