URGENT ADVICE NEEDED: Clearing for a second undergraduate degree

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Lovablegrande
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Hello I’ve recently graduated last year from a Fashion degree and since being in lockdown, I have not been able to find a job or placement in my industry and I’ve slowly started to fade away from fashion, I’m now looking at going back to study at uni! I want to study a Food & Nutrition/Dietetics course because while being in lockdown I have developed a passion or rather an obsession in well-being, wellness, diet and food.

One of my issues is entry requirements, since I come from a fashion degree background having studied art based A/AS Levels at school, am I able to apply for a course of such with those kind of A Levels or is it a must to have a science based A level when applying? (Through clearing) also are British bachelor degrees considered when applying?

Also what other ways can I go about this if I’m not able to apply, any advice is appreciated!
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Lovablegrande
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Hello I’ve recently graduated last year from a Fashion degree and since being in lockdown, I have not been able to find a job or placement in my industry and I’ve slowly started to fade away from fashion, I’m now looking at going back to study at uni! I want to study a Food & Nutrition/Dietetics course because while being in lockdown I have developed a passion or rather an obsession in well-being, wellness, diet and food.

One of my issues is entry requirements, since I come from a fashion degree background having studied art based A/AS Levels at school, am I able to apply for a course of such with those kind of A Levels or is it a must to have a science based A level when applying? (Through clearing) also are British bachelor degrees considered when applying?

Also what other ways can I go about this if I’m not able to apply, any advice is appreciated!
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PQ
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(Original post by Lovablegrande)
Hello I’ve recently graduated last year from a Fashion degree and since being in lockdown, I have not been able to find a job or placement in my industry and I’ve slowly started to fade away from fashion, I’m now looking at going back to study at uni! I want to study a Food & Nutrition/Dietetics course because while being in lockdown I have developed a passion or rather an obsession in well-being, wellness, diet and food.

One of my issues is entry requirements, since I come from a fashion degree background having studied art based A/AS Levels at school, am I able to apply for a course of such with those kind of A Levels or is it a must to have a science based A level when applying? (Through clearing) also are British bachelor degrees considered when applying?

Also what other ways can I go about this if I’m not able to apply, any advice is appreciated!
Contact the universities that you’re interested in applying to and explain your situation and ask for their advice. It might be possible to join a course with a foundation year or they might advise you to take an access to he diploma before you apply.

Have you thought about how you would fund a second degree? There’s no student finance available for nutrition/dietetics as a second degree if you study full time. If you can find a part time course then you would normally be eligible for funding as there’s part time funding for a stem second degree available.
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Lovablegrande
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(Original post by PQ)
Contact the universities that you’re interested in applying to and explain your situation and ask for their advice. It might be possible to join a course with a foundation year or they might advise you to take an access to he diploma before you apply.

Have you thought about how you would fund a second degree? There’s no student finance available for nutrition/dietetics as a second degree if you study full time. If you can find a part time course then you would normally be eligible for funding as there’s part time funding for a stem second degree available.
From what I’ve been reading recently that certain health courses are covered by the nhs and dietetics is one of them and plus you can apply for sfe because it’s a health course even if it’s a second degree
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PQ
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(Original post by Lovablegrande)
From what I’ve been reading recently that certain health courses are covered by the nhs and dietetics is one of them and plus you can apply for sfe because it’s a health course even if it’s a second degree
NHS recognised dietetics courses yes - food and nutrition no.
There's a very specific list of courses that are eligible for registration with HCPC and therefore exempt
https://www.hcpc-uk.org/education/ap...Size=25&Page=1
None of the funded courses are Food & Nutrition courses
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ChammyIRL
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(Original post by PQ)
NHS recognised dietetics courses yes - food and nutrition no.
There's a very specific list of courses that are eligible for registration with HCPC and therefore exempt
https://www.hcpc-uk.org/education/ap...Size=25&Page=1
None of the funded courses are Food & Nutrition courses
Also note, dietetics is a VERY sort after and competitive course. If you have no science background, specifically biology, then you might struggle and many universities are looking for individuals with some experience such as volunteering/shadowing.

If this is the route you want then maybe look at Dietetic Assistant jobs, as these normally only want a level 3 qualification and someone with a passion for food and health. After some time in this role you might then be able to look at an MSc in Dietetics and have a good chance of being accepted due to experience rather than previous study - in that time try get an A level in biology or some qualification in human nutrition as you will need it for science-based modules.

Hope this helps.
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Lovablegrande
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(Original post by ChammyIRL)
Also note, dietetics is a VERY sort after and competitive course. If you have no science background, specifically biology, then you might struggle and many universities are looking for individuals with some experience such as volunteering/shadowing.

If this is the route you want then maybe look at Dietetic Assistant jobs, as these normally only want a level 3 qualification and someone with a passion for food and health. After some time in this role you might then be able to look at an MSc in Dietetics and have a good chance of being accepted due to experience rather than previous study - in that time try get an A level in biology or some qualification in human nutrition as you will need it for science-based modules.

Hope this helps.
How would I be able to take an A level again? Are there any recognised online A level courses?
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ChammyIRL
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(Original post by Lovablegrande)
How would I be able to take an A level again? Are there any recognised online A level courses?
You can look at local colleges to see if they offer them to older students or privately through online colleges. There is a chance that it will cost you to study these, I looked at them as I was thinking about going into studying as a biology teacher and they wanted me to have an a-level despite having my degree. This is why I suggested it alongside work, so it is affordable.

Alternatively, there is the Access to Higher Education Diploma (Science) which is a year at college, part-time, and you can possibly have that funded by the adult learning grant - I'm not 100% on the requirements for that with already having a degree. Then you can apply for a Nutrition and Dietetics BSc
which might be covered under the Allied Health Professionals second degree funding - must have Dietetics in the name though.
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Nairb98
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If you are applying for an allied health course (AHC) coming from a non-AHC background, or without a similar degree within the field, work experience (preferably within the NHS) will take you a long way.
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JM392235
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I was also thinking about doing a second degree in nutrition. There are joint courses available that do nutrition and dietetics together, would this qualify under the funding for a second course?
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Lovablegrande
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(Original post by Nairb98)
If you are applying for an allied health course (AHC) coming from a non-AHC background, or without a similar degree within the field, work experience (preferably within the NHS) will take you a long way.
What’s the easiest route around this then? What other alternatives?
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ChammyIRL
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(Original post by JM392235)
I was also thinking about doing a second degree in nutrition. There are joint courses available that do nutrition and dietetics together, would this qualify under the funding for a second course?
I think most of them do, yes but you would have to check the individual course - it would need to be classed as an Allied Health Professions Course. The university should have a section about them.

Again, very competitive, especially since COIVD with lots of people looking to retrain in health courses so for your best chance at least an A-level in Biology or equivalent in a science course (such as Access HE Diploma) and experience in the setting.

Just as an example, at my uni (Sheffield Hallam) the 2 year MSc in Dietetics only has 20 places available and I think there were 44 interviews conducted this year - I know every interview slot was taken. Even students with a degree in nutrition have been rejected so you need to do everything to show you're committed to being a dietitian/nutritionist.
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Nairb98
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(Original post by Lovablegrande)
What’s the easiest route around this then? What other alternatives?
I would contact unis that do the course and explain your situation and ask what you can do to improve your chance of getting in to uni next year just so you know more of what the unis actually want.

They'll probably say the best thing to do is get a job (or work experience if you can manage going 12 months without pay), most likely an assistant role, in the NHS or similar. You just have to prove you know about working in the NHS and/or the role of a dietician, and show how committed you are to it. What better way to do that than to have worked as one.

I'm in clearing as I decided to switch to an allied health course late on, and chances of me getting in look very slim. Even though my previous qualification is similar, many people have the qualifications too. If I had experience within NHS I believe I would get in without hesitation. If I don't get a place in clearing I'll look to spend the next 6-12 months working as an assistant in the NHS and apply again next year.

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