harufolio
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I am currently in Year 10, which is quite a long time away from a university course, but I would like to know if it is possible to study both art and biology. I love both art and science (specifically biology) and I would love to study both. I have heard of doing a combined honours degree in two different subjects as well as doing part-time degrees in illustration and biological sciences. I am also uninterested into doing art therapy.

I was wondering if anyone knows if there is any possible career path that can involve both biology and art equally? Also, is there any academic route I could go into?
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WazzWazz98
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Yes art therapy is a potential choice but I don't think there are combined honours with both subjects unfortunately
Doesn't mean you can't still do art as a hobby /extracurricular activity though if studying biology
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Final Fantasy
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Yeah you could design custom prosthetics for disabled people. Is that something you'd be interested in? Or you can do the animation for science videos like on YouTube or something.
Last edited by Final Fantasy; 2 months ago
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Chicken.M.
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Yeah I've seen a guy on youtube who creates art by letting mold grow all over a canvas lol.
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harufolio
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(Original post by Chicken.M.)
Yeah I've seen a guy on youtube who creates art by letting mold grow all over a canvas lol.
..Not quite what I wanted, but thank you for your contribution. I do not think that this needs any qualifications lol.
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username5173262
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Biology / Medical Illustrative work? Like, you know, those people who do the anatomy books or wildlife books..
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_kvymnnn
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There's always scientific illustration!
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harufolio
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
Biology / Medical Illustrative work? Like, you know, those people who do the anatomy books or wildlife books..
(Original post by _kvymnnn)
There's always scientific illustration!
Thanks, I believe this is what I wanted to do. Do you know how to get into this career? I have been researching it lately but I can't find out exactly what I need to do to get into the field of medical/scientific illustration!
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_kvymnnn
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(Original post by harufolio)
Thanks, I believe this is what I wanted to do. Do you know how to get into this career? I have been researching it lately but I can't find out exactly what I need to do to get into the field of medical/scientific illustration!
I'm not too sure myself but, from what I've researched, you usually get a degree in a science subject? (Again don't take my word for it). Afterwards, you can do a masters in scientific illustration or a course that trains you alongside working?
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xxx0xxxo
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There is an art & science course at UAL
Design & technology is another way to merge the two
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username5173262
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(Original post by harufolio)
Thanks, I believe this is what I wanted to do. Do you know how to get into this career? I have been researching it lately but I can't find out exactly what I need to do to get into the field of medical/scientific illustration!
Really can't help you there chief. UCAS seems to have an idea, although how trustworthy UCAS articles are is another question... https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcse...al-illustrator

The best place to ask from what I know (which isn't much lol) would be a subreddit similar to this: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskBiology/ OR https://www.reddit.com/r/biology/
Seems to be some career questions on both and they're a very specialist community which might have more answers tailored to biology - of course though I'm sure people on here know as well so keep checking I guess lol.
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University of Sheffield Students
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(Original post by harufolio)
I am currently in Year 10, which is quite a long time away from a university course, but I would like to know if it is possible to study both art and biology. I love both art and science (specifically biology) and I would love to study both. I have heard of doing a combined honours degree in two different subjects as well as doing part-time degrees in illustration and biological sciences. I am also uninterested into doing art therapy.

I was wondering if anyone knows if there is any possible career path that can involve both biology and art equally? Also, is there any academic route I could go into?
Hi,

Science communication is an exciting discipline that allows you to combine a love for art and biology. By following a Science Communication route your could even work as an animator or illustrator biology-focused education channels on Youtube such as PBS EONs, SciShow, and the AmoebaSisters.

I hope this helps, but if you have any further questions, feel free to ask.

Daniel
Third Year
BSc Biology with a Year Abroad
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Yeah you could design custom prosthetics for disabled people. Is that something you'd be interested in? Or you can do the animation for science videos like on YouTube or something.
The first is more product design/engineering and the latter is animation/editing

-------------------

OP as others have suggested look into biological illustrations, there are art in biology competitions that are run nationally (i know this as i won a prize in one of them when i was a teenager), have a dabble in those and see what comes of it

There's no harm in keeping your options open. I was conflicted about going into a science or design background and did art and biology at Alevel. Illustration would probably be your best bet if you wanted to pursue this line of work with a view to specialise later.

Here are a list of unis that offer scientific/technical illustration courses
https://www.hotcoursesabroad.com/stu.../programs.html
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artful_lounger
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The entire field of medical illustration comes to mind; I believe GSA and Dundee (which has a notable anatomy department) have courses in that area at masters level. I think it would probably be more typical to have an undergraduate degree in an art/design field then go into those courses than begin in a bioscience field and move into them, although at least at Dundee I gather the latter is possible (although all applicants need to submit a portfolio when applying and you will be competing with people who have curated a porfolio over 3+ years of an art/design degree!). Then you could potentially work in that field afterwards; I get the impression though like all design fields it's hard to get a foot in the door and you need to be good at networking to make yourself known so you can get contracted for work regularly.

I doubt there are many courses that you can combine the two at undergraduate level in any substantial way however. UCL has its arts and sciences course which does include some design based modules from the Bartlett and a drawing module from the Slade as options, although I think this would only amount to 3-4 modules over the whole course. The Slade module is actually open to students on any course permitted to take external modules who are admitted to it though (you need to submit a portfolio to take the module I think) as I understand. On the design side while you probably wouldn't be studying biosciences directly per se, bio-inspired design is not an uncommon approach to design tasks I gather, particularly in architectural fields (especially at very conceptual architecture courses like at the Bartlett; I think one year there were like at least 5 or 6 final projects based on this?).

Less on the bioscience side and more on the physical science/engineering side there are some courses focusing on design aspects of engineering e.g. the Imperial design engineering course offered jointly with the RCA. I imagine it might be possible to explore some bio-inspired design and maybe bioengineering stuff in courses like that, but it would probably vary and the biological element would probably mostly come from independent study to support your design work (like the above mentioned design courses).

PQ might have some ideas?
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by xxx0xxxo)
There is an art & science course at UAL
Design & technology is another way to merge the two
Design tech is definitely a middle spectrum between art and engineering but i wouldnt necessarily say it combined art and biology especially.
There are some sectors where it is, anthropometric design and some areas of performance garment design but if art and biology is the OPs real passion i feel that they would be easily bored by a product design university course as it doesn't focus in depth on anthropometrics, more of a consideration alongside ergonomics
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Chicken.M.
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(Original post by V℮rsions)
Biology / Medical Illustrative work? Like, you know, those people who do the anatomy books or wildlife books..
Ah yeah I have a friend who studied medicine and she had to do loads of illustrations of anatomy.
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PQ
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I’ve known modelmaking and makeup graduates (who specialised in silicone design and production as part of their degree) go on to work in prosthetics and orthotics. There’s a couple of universities offering degrees in orthotics/prosthetics - they’re a very specialised mix of biology, design/engineering, ergonomics and creative flair. Depending on your skillset and preferences there’s a huge range of areas that prosthetics/orthotics professionals work in - while there’s some “off the peg” orthotics most prosthetics and a lot of orthotics are custom made - and with things that people are wearing and using every day the appearance can often matter as much as the functionality. Good orthotics and prosthetics are life changing and true art works.
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xxx0xxxo
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Design tech is definitely a middle spectrum between art and engineering but i wouldnt necessarily say it combined art and biology especially.
There are some sectors where it is, anthropometric design and some areas of performance garment design but if art and biology is the OPs real passion i feel that they would be easily bored by a product design university course as it doesn't focus in depth on anthropometrics, more of a consideration alongside ergonomics
I was thinking of architecture degrees that do biocomputing although that might be too niche. The Bartlett do some amazing courses that mix biology/science and design as well as being artsy
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harufolio
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Thanks for the replies. I am considering medical/scientific illustration masters after reading all of the comments. What is the most suitable HE courses needed for a Msc Medical Art degree or similar (I have researched on these courses, but I am still unsure about whether or not to take an undergraduate course in art or biology)? Also, is it possible to get a career in this field without a masters? The few universities that have the courses are extremely far away from where I currently live in the South West.
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Yungabs97
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Dentistry perhaps? Involves the biological anatomy of the tooth and the manual dexterity and precision of an artist?
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