justdyinginside
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I'm currently working on an EPQ and I've chosen to do how women are villainised in Greek Mythology, however, my school is being extremely unhelpful and I have no idea what I'm meant to be doing. I was wondering if anyone who has done a similar topic, or just an EPQ in general, would be able to help me out! I'm meant to be working on the first draft but I don't even know what I'm meant to research and I'm so stressed out
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Trinculo
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Go with an easy structure - three points, a counterpoint and then a conclusion. I'd look at regular women, heroic women and goddesses. Take at least one example of each where you can find a woman being made out to be the baddie - Medusa isn't a bad shout. Metamorphoses tell us that she was a regular woman who was raped by Poseidon in the temple of Athena - and for this grave sin, Athena turned her into the most horrendous monster, who went around doing monstrous things until she was slain by heroic Perseus. That's three in one, really - you get Medusa the mortal, Medusa the monster (hero) and Athena the goddess all getting the bad end of the stick from antiquity.

Other examples are how Hera was always so conniving, Athena just went and all out murdered her best mate - the Judgement of Paris is literally about getting some bozo off the streets and getting him to decide who the hottest goddess in the universe is.

On the flip side, the dudes get a fairly easy deal- half of mythology stems from Zeus having sex with whoever he wants, and the only people that suffer are his offspring at the hands of (usually) female rival deities.

You could counterpoint this with maybe that's just how the Greeks were, with women being sort of household politicians and spouses for the purposes of procreation, but everything else was the purview of men -to an extent even homosexual love was thought of as being superior. Throw in some women who were kind of ok (I struggle to think of many - Antigone is certainly a sympathetic and noble character by our measure as a reader - although she's clearly villainised by Creon. Another Sophocles heroine is obviously Electra, although this has to be balanced out by the villany of her mum, Clytemnestra.

Work on the common themes within each category, see if you can relate them to any wider Greek historical or socio-political themes and as above with Sophocles, see if they are exclusive to certain poets. In Homer, the women are either slaves like Briseis and Chryseis, maidens to be saved like Penelope and Helen, or outright monsters like the Sirens, Circe and Calypso.

Sounds quite cool really. Wish I had done that.
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justdyinginside
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(Original post by Trinculo)
Go with an easy structure - three points, a counterpoint and then a conclusion. I'd look at regular women, heroic women and goddesses. Take at least one example of each where you can find a woman being made out to be the baddie - Medusa isn't a bad shout. Metamorphoses tell us that she was a regular woman who was raped by Poseidon in the temple of Athena - and for this grave sin, Athena turned her into the most horrendous monster, who went around doing monstrous things until she was slain by heroic Perseus. That's three in one, really - you get Medusa the mortal, Medusa the monster (hero) and Athena the goddess all getting the bad end of the stick from antiquity.

Other examples are how Hera was always so conniving, Athena just went and all out murdered her best mate - the Judgement of Paris is literally about getting some bozo off the streets and getting him to decide who the hottest goddess in the universe is.

On the flip side, the dudes get a fairly easy deal- half of mythology stems from Zeus having sex with whoever he wants, and the only people that suffer are his offspring at the hands of (usually) female rival deities.

You could counterpoint this with maybe that's just how the Greeks were, with women being sort of household politicians and spouses for the purposes of procreation, but everything else was the purview of men -to an extent even homosexual love was thought of as being superior. Throw in some women who were kind of ok (I struggle to think of many - Antigone is certainly a sympathetic and noble character by our measure as a reader - although she's clearly villainised by Creon. Another Sophocles heroine is obviously Electra, although this has to be balanced out by the villany of her mum, Clytemnestra.

Work on the common themes within each category, see if you can relate them to any wider Greek historical or socio-political themes and as above with Sophocles, see if they are exclusive to certain poets. In Homer, the women are either slaves like Briseis and Chryseis, maidens to be saved like Penelope and Helen, or outright monsters like the Sirens, Circe and Calypso.

Sounds quite cool really. Wish I had done that.
Thank you so much! it's definitely a topic that I love so hopefully it will get easier as i start
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