nusrxxt
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What are the main differences between them other than foundation med needing lower entry requirements and and extra year?

Also, Is foundation med looked down upon and does it have the same value as a stand-alone medicine course?

Would it be better to take gap year instead of foundation medicine and reapply for medicine next year with my Alevel grades as my predicteds are quite low?
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amber0321
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Hi! I applied for a foundation course for 2021 entry so I can try answer some of these

It depends on the uni really, as they’ll have different requirements and each course will be different - both of the ones I applied for required widening access criteria for entry. The other main differences between the two are that foundation medicine is more of a pre-med course, so there are little-no clinical placements as it’s more focused on the science aspects of medicine.
To add to this, most foundation med courses will require you to sit the ucat (similar to regular med) as well as take part in an interview, and they are often smaller in class size also. For comparison, the foundation course vs med course at one of the universities I applied to have a class size difference of about 200 students (around 20 in the foundation course) so it’s still quite competitive.

Depending on the uni (some don’t require this, but many do), you will have to resit the ucat and complete a second interview after completing the foundation course for entry to medicine, where you are not guaranteed a place usually. This means you will be competing with medicine applicants who are school leavers etc. so it’s obviously quite competitive still. The advantage of this is that most foundation course interviews are identical/very similar to that of the medicine ones, so you’ll have experience in this side

As far as I know, foundation med isn’t looked down upon at all! It’s a great way for people to get into medicine if they’ve struggled with grades etc.

In my personal opinion, you would be better to take a gap year and apply with your actual grades, or resit any subjects (if required) and then apply. However it’s entirely up to you! Foundation courses are still a great way to gain experience, and it’s far easier to get work experience in a medical setting during your course as some NHS locations will hire HCAs who are completing foundation medicine/medicine courses. It’ll also help you adjust to the demands of a uni course along with a number of other advantages. There are disadvantages to it, such as additional costs of tuition fee loans etc. however if you’re prepared to take these on, then there’s no reason you shouldn’t go for it if you want to!

Good luck with whatever you decide
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GANFYD
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Just to be clear, ALL Foundation Courses (that are not for those with the wrong A level subjects) are for Widening Participation applicants, they are not for general entry for people who just did not make the grades for standard entry.
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nusrxxt
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(Original post by amber0321)
Hi! I applied for a foundation course for 2021 entry so I can try answer some of these

It depends on the uni really, as they’ll have different requirements and each course will be different - both of the ones I applied for required widening access criteria for entry. The other main differences between the two are that foundation medicine is more of a pre-med course, so there are little-no clinical placements as it’s more focused on the science aspects of medicine.
To add to this, most foundation med courses will require you to sit the ucat (similar to regular med) as well as take part in an interview, and they are often smaller in class size also. For comparison, the foundation course vs med course at one of the universities I applied to have a class size difference of about 200 students (around 20 in the foundation course) so it’s still quite competitive.

Depending on the uni (some don’t require this, but many do), you will have to resit the ucat and complete a second interview after completing the foundation course for entry to medicine, where you are not guaranteed a place usually. This means you will be competing with medicine applicants who are school leavers etc. so it’s obviously quite competitive still. The advantage of this is that most foundation course interviews are identical/very similar to that of the medicine ones, so you’ll have experience in this side

As far as I know, foundation med isn’t looked down upon at all! It’s a great way for people to get into medicine if they’ve struggled with grades etc.

In my personal opinion, you would be better to take a gap year and apply with your actual grades, or resit any subjects (if required) and then apply. However it’s entirely up to you! Foundation courses are still a great way to gain experience, and it’s far easier to get work experience in a medical setting during your course as some NHS locations will hire HCAs who are completing foundation medicine/medicine courses. It’ll also help you adjust to the demands of a uni course along with a number of other advantages. There are disadvantages to it, such as additional costs of tuition fee loans etc. however if you’re prepared to take these on, then there’s no reason you shouldn’t go for it if you want to!

Good luck with whatever you decide
thankyou so much for explaining it so well and putting time into replying I appreciate it, I was considering KCl if I do take foundation medicine, I have one more question, so if I take foundation medicine the first year focus on the ' foundation of med' but what are the following years like do the class sizes get bigger and do we join medic applicants?
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nusrxxt
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(Original post by GANFYD)
Just to be clear, ALL Foundation Courses (that are not for those with the wrong A level subjects) are for Widening Participation applicants, they are not for general entry for people who just did not make the grades for standard entry.
I take bio maths chem, my predicted grades are quite low so my teacher suggested foundation medicine, So not everyone can take foundation medicine only widening participants? :/ I didn't know thankyou for telling me
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by nusrxxt)
I take bio maths chem, my predicted grades are quite low so my teacher suggested foundation medicine, So not everyone can take foundation medicine only widening participants? :/ I didn't know thankyou for telling me
Yes, medicine with a foundation year courses are for people who meet specific widening participation criteria. Medicine with a gateway year is a course for those who took the "wrong" subjects but had strong grades. If you have the right subjects but low grades your main option would be to take a gap year and either apply as a post-qualification applicant having exceeded your predicted grades, or to retake any subjects necessary to meet the entry criteria of the medical schools you wish to apply to (taking account that some medical schools may not accept retakes under certain situations; there are others that do though).
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amber0321
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(Original post by nusrxxt)
thankyou so much for explaining it so well and putting time into replying I appreciate it, I was considering KCl if I do take foundation medicine, I have one more question, so if I take foundation medicine the first year focus on the ' foundation of med' but what are the following years like do the class sizes get bigger and do we join medic applicants?
Happy I could help! I’m not entirely sure for KCL as I only applied to foundation courses in Scotland, so this might be quite different. For the courses in Scotland, following completion of the foundation year, you effectively “start over” and rejoin the medicine course as a first year medical student in the much larger medical classes. This may be drastically different at English universities so I’m sorry I couldn’t be more help with this!
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nusrxxt
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(Original post by amber0321)
Happy I could help! I’m not entirely sure for KCL as I only applied to foundation courses in Scotland, so this might be quite different. For the courses in Scotland, following completion of the foundation year, you effectively “start over” and rejoin the medicine course as a first year medical student in the much larger medical classes. This may be drastically different at English universities so I’m sorry I couldn’t be more help with this!
thanks again
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nusrxxt
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Yes, medicine with a foundation year courses are for people who meet specific widening participation criteria. Medicine with a gateway year is a course for those who took the "wrong" subjects but had strong grades. If you have the right subjects but low grades your main option would be to take a gap year and either apply as a post-qualification applicant having exceeded your predicted grades, or to retake any subjects necessary to meet the entry criteria of the medical schools you wish to apply to (taking account that some medical schools may not accept retakes under certain situations; there are others that do though).
thankyouu
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