asianbookworm
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Hello,
I will be applying in universities for 2022, and I am quite sure I will be doing law. Now my question is does it matter if your uni is a russell group or not when applying for training contracts at law firm, or what if the uni you go to doesn't have as good reputation as a Russell group and any top 30 unis? I went to open days for UON (Russell group) and leicester (a good uni known for a good law course) both require AAA or contextual AAB. But I do want to apply to a uni with BBB entry requirements just to be on a safe side incase something bad happens. So I will be applying for trent. So, should I be applying to 2 universities with bbb predicted and then 3 universities with either Russell groups or famous names? Because people are really scaring me that you don't get jobs if you don't to that uni or this uni etc etc.
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Bluebird33
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(Original post by asianbookworm)
Hello,
I will be applying in universities for 2022, and I am quite sure I will be doing law. Now my question is does it matter if your uni is a russell group or not when applying for training contracts at law firm, or what if the uni you go to doesn't have as good reputation as a Russell group and any top 30 unis? I went to open days for UON (Russell group) and leicester (a good uni known for a good law course) both require AAA or contextual AAB. But I do want to apply to a uni with BBB entry requirements just to be on a safe side incase something bad happens. So I will be applying for trent. So, should I be applying to 2 universities with bbb predicted and then 3 universities with either Russell groups or famous names? Because people are really scaring me that you don't get jobs if you don't to that uni or this uni etc etc.
I think it's the student and not what university you attend 🧐 good luck xx ☺️
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Trinculo
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Anyone who tells you it isn't going to be hard is lying.

Legal services is a tough thing to get into and has been for a fair few years. If you want training, it's going to be hard work even if you go to the best universities. If you go to a low-ranked uni, your chances of training with a top firm who are also likely to pay you decent money and pay for law school are low. If you go to a low-ranked uni, even with a 1st class, you may well be looking at years as a paralegal and paying your own law school.

To get the best chance, you really need to go to the best uni you can, get top grades in your first year and then get into vacation schemes with good firms on the back of your first year results. Then try and get into probono work.

If you think you're heading toward something in the AAB-BBB range, and you are absolutely sure you want to practise, then my advice would be to match the best universities you can get into on those grades with a course that you think you will enjoy and do well in (that isn't law). A good degree in something else from a top uni is so much better than an LLB from a low rank place.

For example, if you can live with Philosophy or Ancient History, you can go to Bristol on a BBB contextual offer. It's well known that Birmingham throws around CCC offers like confetti for a lot of courses (although some people think it's more aimed at the private schools). Some good unis have unpopular courses on at lower grades - a lot of philosopy and religion type courses can be found around ABB or BBB even at places like Nottingham.
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ceryyyssss
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(Original post by Trinculo)
Anyone who tells you it isn't going to be hard is lying.

Legal services is a tough thing to get into and has been for a fair few years. If you want training, it's going to be hard work even if you go to the best universities. If you go to a low-ranked uni, your chances of training with a top firm who are also likely to pay you decent money and pay for law school are low. If you go to a low-ranked uni, even with a 1st class, you may well be looking at years as a paralegal and paying your own law school.

To get the best chance, you really need to go to the best uni you can, get top grades in your first year and then get into vacation schemes with good firms on the back of your first year results. Then try and get into probono work.

If you think you're heading toward something in the AAB-BBB range, and you are absolutely sure you want to practise, then my advice would be to match the best universities you can get into on those grades with a course that you think you will enjoy and do well in (that isn't law). A good degree in something else from a top uni is so much better than an LLB from a low rank place.

For example, if you can live with Philosophy or Ancient History, you can go to Bristol on a BBB contextual offer. It's well known that Birmingham throws around CCC offers like confetti for a lot of courses (although some people think it's more aimed at the private schools). Some good unis have unpopular courses on at lower grades - a lot of philosopy and religion type courses can be found around ABB or BBB even at places like Nottingham.
however, due to the new system of SQE’s being introduced. this path isn’t really recommended.
if you want to get an in-depth knowledge of the law- study law at university- if you’re passionate about it you’ll be rewarded.
the difference between the SQE and the previous law conversion course is that when you’re preparing for the SQE, you’re taught the basics. You won’t be half as prepared as students who have studied these cases for 3 years, and be at a massive disadvantage.
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brokestudent3
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as someone doing scots law ive been told it matters. i’ve heard though that getting a 1:1 from a uni that isn’t seen to be as prestigious is worth just as much as a 2:1 or 2:2 from a more prestigious uni. really just go where you like the course and a uni you’re happy at
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Trinculo
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(Original post by ceryyyssss)
however, due to the new system of SQE’s being introduced. this path isn’t really recommended.
if you want to get an in-depth knowledge of the law- study law at university- if you’re passionate about it you’ll be rewarded.
the difference between the SQE and the previous law conversion course is that when you’re preparing for the SQE, you’re taught the basics. You won’t be half as prepared as students who have studied these cases for 3 years, and be at a massive disadvantage.
The law school will get anyone through the exams - that’s their job. The idea that reading law at university will somehow give you an in-depth knowledge of “these cases” is very odd. Can you name some cases that get studied for three years?
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ceryyyssss
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(Original post by Trinculo)
The law school will get anyone through the exams - that’s their job. The idea that reading law at university will somehow give you an in-depth knowledge of “these cases” is very odd. Can you name some cases that get studied for three years?
do you think that someone who’s studied a subject for 4 years will know the same amount of knowledge of someone who’s done a fast track course to pass an exam.
the SQE prep, purely prepares you for that exam, not a future in the legal profession.
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Gmaster1980
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(Original post by ceryyyssss)
do you think that someone who’s studied a subject for 4 years will know the same amount of knowledge of someone who’s done a fast track course to pass an exam.
the SQE prep, purely prepares you for that exam, not a future in the legal profession.
And that doesn't matter if a law firm will still hire them, so the point is kind of moot. No one actually knows what firms will decide on this, and the GDL is still going to be an option to gain legal knowledge (even if it isn't required to qualify at the end of the day).
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ceryyyssss
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you should read letters to a law student- nick mcbride. in that he explains the new system and how he believes it’s better to do a law degree when going on to law. of course it’s upto the person at the end of the day
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asianbookworm
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Thank you so much for everyone's help. Needs to get this clear- at the end of the day while getting a contract from a law firm- does it matter which university you went to? Because according to my information almost every university have contacts with the law firms all over the country and that does help. But I'm not quite sure. All I am scared of is after doing law degree not getting a job or a firm to pay for my LPC. Because I really do want to be a lawyer and I am working very hard- so I believe my A level will go to AAA from AAB.
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ceryyyssss
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(Original post by asianbookworm)
Thank you so much for everyone's help. Needs to get this clear- at the end of the day while getting a contract from a law firm- does it matter which university you went to? Because according to my information almost every university have contacts with the law firms all over the country and that does help. But I'm not quite sure. All I am scared of is after doing law degree not getting a job or a firm to pay for my LPC. Because I really do want to be a lawyer and I am working very hard- so I believe my A level will go to AAA from AAB.
go onto the legal cheek website, you can look at what type of universities law firms take graduates from, the minimum a level and degree requirements & what grants they offer for LPC/GDL however that statistic will probably change for the SQE
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LawStudent456
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(Original post by brokestudent3)
as someone doing scots law ive been told it matters. i’ve heard though that getting a 1:1 from a uni that isn’t seen to be as prestigious is worth just as much as a 2:1 or 2:2 from a more prestigious uni. really just go where you like the course and a uni you’re happy at
And what if you don’t get a first?
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brokestudent3
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(Original post by daveymcloughlin)
And what if you don’t get a first?
then it’ll be harder to get traineeships and finding employment at a firm
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