JAMEH
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Hi,

I was just wondering what textbooks the lecture for Physics at Kings are based on?
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NovaeSci
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Should be able to access the lists from the following link:

https://kcl.rl.talis.com/departments/ccp.html

The codes start with the level the module is at. But if still unsure, follow the following link to find modules:

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/abroad/module-...h?dept=physics
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JAMEH
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
Should be able to access the lists from the following link:

https://kcl.rl.talis.com/departments/ccp.html

The codes start with the level the module is at. But if still unsure, follow the following link to find modules:

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/abroad/module-...h?dept=physics
Thank you!
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artful_lounger
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Usually lectures in the UK aren't based on a specific textbook, and you very rarely are expected to buy any particular textbook. If this is required they will let you know in advance. You'll usually be expected to consult various textbooks as suggested or through your own explorations using library resources.

That said the standard textbook for first year physics at uni seems almost always to be Young & Freedman 'University Physics with Modern Physics' (also known as Sears & Zemansky after the publisher), possibly supplemented by other texts. For second year and beyond there is generally more of a variety (also in principle there are other similar texts to Young & Freedman but it's just the most common one and the KCL library will probably have several copies of it).
Last edited by artful_lounger; 2 months ago
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NovaeSci
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Aye, as artful_lounger said, Sears & Zemansky University Physics with Modern Physics, is pretty much the go-to standard textbook of undergraduate Physics degrees in the UK. I'm actually going to also be using that textbook on my Physics Access course, so I've already got my copy and it's a good textbook.

Just to add, usually, Universities will also require you to have Mastering Physics, which is an online learning resource/portal, which, I believe, is only available with the 13th edition of University Physics; whereas, with the 14th, and the latest 15th edition, you will have to purchase, separately. I could be wrong, though. I've purchased the 13th edition with Mastering Physics and I can actually view the later editions online; however, there doesn't seem to be that much difference (besides a massive price difference, ha), should you decide on the 13th edition.

Whilst I personally find that I prefer paper textbooks, if you prefer to view yours on a tablet, then you can save a bit more money on just the e-text and Mastering Physics. It is worth checking with your uni, however, as you could easily use Tipler's University Physics, or Halliday's Fundamental's of Physics, which I believe are also used at a number of Unis.
Last edited by NovaeSci; 2 months ago
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by NovaeSci)
Aye, as artful_lounger said, Sears & Zemansky University Physics with Modern Physics, is pretty much the go-to standard textbook of undergraduate Physics degrees in the UK. I'm actually going to also be using that textbook on my Physics Access course, so I've already got my copy and it's a good textbook.

Just to add, usually, Universities will also require you to have Mastering Physics, which is an online learning resource/portal, which, I believe, is only available with the 13th edition of University Physics; whereas, with the 14th, and the latest 15th edition, you will have to purchase, separately. I could be wrong, though. I've purchased the 13th edition with Mastering Physics and I can actually view the later editions online; however, there doesn't seem to be that much difference (besides a massive price difference, ha), should you decide on the 13th edition.

Whilst I personally find that I prefer paper textbooks, if you prefer to view yours on a tablet, then you can save a bit more money on just the e-text and Mastering Physics. It is worth checking with your uni, however, as you could easily use Tipler's University Physics, or Halliday's Fundamental's of Physics, which I believe are also used at a number of Unis.
It's not just the UK, its also the standard text in the US I imagine it's probably pretty commonly used in all Anglophone countries honestly!

Spoiler:
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Also semi-relevant and amusing exchange on twitter with one of the authors:

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NovaeSci
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Haha, those comments!

I believe the one that I was required to purchase was the International (or Global) edition which is in SI units. I'm unsure what the US edition would be, seeing as SI units have been pretty much adopted worldwide now..
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NovaeSci
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I've just looked at the prices of a new copy of University Physics with Modern Physics, with Mastering Physics...what the hell!!! :eek:

I purchased my 13th edition years ago (lucky that it's used in my access course and degree) to do a bit of self-study, and it only was about £50-60 with Mastering Physics. It seems to be in the £100s of pounds now. What on earth has happened to the price of textbooks!!?

EDIT: Ignore the above, I was looking on the Pearson site. I've found the fifteenth edition for £50 without Mastering Physics and £60 with Mastering Physics. See the link below. I'd purchase this if I was you.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/University-...92314958&psc=1
Last edited by NovaeSci; 2 months ago
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JAMEH
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Usually lectures in the UK aren't based on a specific textbook, and you very rarely are expected to buy any particular textbook. If this is required they will let you know in advance. You'll usually be expected to consult various textbooks as suggested or through your own explorations using library resources.

That said the standard textbook for first year physics at uni seems almost always to be Young & Freedman 'University Physics with Modern Physics' (also known as Sears & Zemansky after the publisher), possibly supplemented by other texts. For second year and beyond there is generally more of a variety (also in principle there are other similar texts to Young & Freedman but it's just the most common one and the KCL library will probably have several copies of it).
Oh I see, thank you. I just wanted to have a textbook anyways for good reference, I was thinking it was the Young and Freedman one.
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