f1monkeys
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Hi,

I want to do a MEng in Mechanical Engineering, I'm looking at the top universities but I'm not sure which ones would suit me. I'm looking for somewhere really diverse and one of the universities with a higher female percentage taking the course (given that it is quite male-dominated). Do any universities come to your mind?

Thanks!
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by f1monkeys)
Hi,

I want to do a MEng in Mechanical Engineering, I'm looking at the top universities but I'm not sure which ones would suit me. I'm looking for somewhere really diverse and one of the universities with a higher female percentage taking the course (given that it is quite male-dominated). Do any universities come to your mind?

Thanks!
Hey f1monkeys We offer a really popular MEng in Mechanical Engineering at Strathclyde and I'd be happy to chat to you about our degrees if you end up considering us! My sister actually graduated from this degree recently so I have a bit of insight in to the programme and I know plenty of women studying our Engineering degrees. She did a few work placements throughout her time at uni, studied abroad in Japan and has now moved in to a graduate job in the Oil & Gas industry. While I believe the majority of courses may still be male dominated, we're noticing an increase in female applicants each year which is so good to see and really welcome. Strathclyde is also really diverse with over 100 nationalities represented on campus, as is the city of Glasgow, so I'm sure you'd feel at home in our student community :^_^:

When thinking of where you'd like to study, consider everything that's important to you and write that down. Then when you look at unis you'll have an idea of what to ask and work out where they meet your expectations. You've already pointed out diversity and gender balance is important to you, and maybe think of other things such as city centre vs greener campuses, clubs/societies, opportunities for work placements and study abroad to name a few. Once you find some unis that tick most of your boxes you'll have some really exciting options to check out - be sure to chat to students using things like Unibuddy and attending Open Days!

Please do feel free to drop me a message if you'd like any more info!
- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
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f1monkeys
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde)
Hey f1monkeys We offer a really popular MEng in Mechanical Engineering at Strathclyde and I'd be happy to chat to you about our degrees if you end up considering us! My sister actually graduated from this degree recently so I have a bit of insight in to the programme and I know plenty of women studying our Engineering degrees. She did a few work placements throughout her time at uni, studied abroad in Japan and has now moved in to a graduate job in the Oil & Gas industry. While I believe the majority of courses may still be male dominated, we're noticing an increase in female applicants each year which is so good to see and really welcome. Strathclyde is also really diverse with over 100 nationalities represented on campus, as is the city of Glasgow, so I'm sure you'd feel at home in our student community :^_^:

When thinking of where you'd like to study, consider everything that's important to you and write that down. Then when you look at unis you'll have an idea of what to ask and work out where they meet your expectations. You've already pointed out diversity and gender balance is important to you, and maybe think of other things such as city centre vs greener campuses, clubs/societies, opportunities for work placements and study abroad to name a few. Once you find some unis that tick most of your boxes you'll have some really exciting options to check out - be sure to chat to students using things like Unibuddy and attending Open Days!

Please do feel free to drop me a message if you'd like any more info!
- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
Wow! Thank you so much Caitlin!! It's really useful to hear about that and I'll be sure to check the course out.

I was wondering what kind of jobs are there in Mechanical Engineering and what is a day in the life of a mechanical engineer like? I've seen a lot of vague answers online but I can't seem to find out what specific tasks mechanical engineers carry out, would you be able to give me some examples/explain to me what your sister is currently doing?

Thank you!!
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ironcxctus
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We had a decent number of girls at Leeds, probably 70-30 split male to female, which is better than I expected. Higher for the first two years due to medical engineering having the same modules for the first two years, though we had one module shared with mechatronics which swung the ratio towards male again.

I enjoyed the course. It had a fair mix of good and bad lecturers - mostly good The bad ones are insanely clever, just not great at communicating if you didn't understand something the way they thought you would. Plenty of resources to help though and lab sessions usually clear it up.

Good opportunities to do some hands on stuff in the various labs from prototyping to programming litte rovers and buggies, to thermofluids and some sma wind tunnels. Nothing groundbreaking but it was fine.

Entry requirements were quite high for the integrated masters, but what you can do is go for BEng and they offer you the MEng when you get to year 3 if you are averaging 2:2 or higher. I think MEng was A*AA and BEng was AAA when I applied, and you got given £1000 a year from the school if you got two or more A*s. Not sure if they still do that, you'd have to see.

edit:
Oh and terms of specific tasks, essentially engineering is problem solving and design. Not the classic 'mechanic' stereotype of someone in.a workshop all greasy. It's not overly hands on, it is theoretical and it is maths and light computing, and it is applying physical principles to solve problems within design constraints.

So the stuff we did for the design and manufacture module was designing a glider or rubber band powered buggy, designing a water wheel with 3d printed buckets and nozzles, and laser cut plate to attach some piping to (had to design the bucket shape/size, nozzle size, and piping to minimise losses, largest power generated won the most marks), we had to reverse engineer a mortice lock, we designed a martian rover or a fast buggy that we had to design, build and program to go along a course and stop in a specific zone, and probably some more tasks I've forgotten now. And the modules that were less hands on were sort of the theory that would go into engineering, like maths, vibration and control, kinematics, computing, analysis, manufacturing, material engineering, thermofluids, mechatronics etc. I found we used stuff from all modules when it came to the design tasks.
Last edited by ironcxctus; 2 months ago
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f1monkeys
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(Original post by ironcxctus)
We had a decent number of girls at Leeds, probably 70-30 split male to female, which is better than I expected. Higher for the first two years due to medical engineering having the same modules for the first two years, though we had one module shared with mechatronics which swung the ratio towards male again.

I enjoyed the course. It had a fair mix of good and bad lecturers - mostly good The bad ones are insanely clever, just not great at communicating if you didn't understand something the way they thought you would. Plenty of resources to help though and lab sessions usually clear it up.

Good opportunities to do some hands on stuff in the various labs from prototyping to programming litte rovers and buggies, to thermofluids and some sma wind tunnels. Nothing groundbreaking but it was fine.

Entry requirements were quite high for the integrated masters, but what you can do is go for BEng and they offer you the MEng when you get to year 3 if you are averaging 2:2 or higher. I think MEng was A*AA and BEng was AAA when I applied, and you got given £1000 a year from the school if you got two or more A*s. Not sure if they still do that, you'd have to see.

edit:
Oh and terms of specific tasks, essentially engineering is problem solving and design. Not the classic 'mechanic' stereotype of someone in.a workshop all greasy. It's not overly hands on, it is theoretical and it is maths and light computing, and it is applying physical principles to solve problems within design constraints.

So the stuff we did for the design and manufacture module was designing a glider or rubber band powered buggy, designing a water wheel with 3d printed buckets and nozzles, and laser cut plate to attach some piping to (had to design the bucket shape/size, nozzle size, and piping to minimise losses, largest power generated won the most marks), we had to reverse engineer a mortice lock, we designed a martian rover or a fast buggy that we had to design, build and program to go along a course and stop in a specific zone, and probably some more tasks I've forgotten now. And the modules that were less hands on were sort of the theory that would go into engineering, like maths, vibration and control, kinematics, computing, analysis, manufacturing, material engineering, thermofluids, mechatronics etc. I found we used stuff from all modules when it came to the design tasks.
I can't believe I didn't see this! Thank you so much, that's great to hear there were a fair amount of girls there. It was really useful to hear about what you did and what kind of modules you learned.
I think I would really like this course, thank you so much for the insight!!
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University of Strathclyde
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(Original post by f1monkeys)
Wow! Thank you so much Caitlin!! It's really useful to hear about that and I'll be sure to check the course out.

I was wondering what kind of jobs are there in Mechanical Engineering and what is a day in the life of a mechanical engineer like? I've seen a lot of vague answers online but I can't seem to find out what specific tasks mechanical engineers carry out, would you be able to give me some examples/explain to me what your sister is currently doing?

Thank you!!
Hey again f1monkeys So sorry I haven't replied sooner!

There's tons of jobs in Mechanical Engineering! It's a really diverse discipline and touches lots of different industries so you'd have plenty of choice. It looks like ironcxctus has already covered loads of info on the day to day side of things, and is definitely far more qualified than I would be to get in to the detail like that with you! But from what I know of what my sister gets up to, she's got a grad job working in Oil & Gas, and does a lot of problem solving and analytical tasks day to day. She's been involved in their plant's turnaround period which she found was a great chance to really put her Engineering skills to the test. If you're not already aware of what a turnaround is then I'd recommend looking that up as that could give you a good indication of the actual 'day in the life' side of things!

Have you considered using something like Unibuddy to get to know Engineering students? One of our student ambassadors Zoe is nearing the end of her time as a Strathclyde student and I'm sure she'd be able to give you a great indication about studying and career options etc too! You can find her profile here if that interests you

Drop me a message any time if I can help with anything else! Best of luck with it!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
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f1monkeys
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde)
Hey again f1monkeys So sorry I haven't replied sooner!

There's tons of jobs in Mechanical Engineering! It's a really diverse discipline and touches lots of different industries so you'd have plenty of choice. It looks like ironcxctus has already covered loads of info on the day to day side of things, and is definitely far more qualified than I would be to get in to the detail like that with you! But from what I know of what my sister gets up to, she's got a grad job working in Oil & Gas, and does a lot of problem solving and analytical tasks day to day. She's been involved in their plant's turnaround period which she found was a great chance to really put her Engineering skills to the test. If you're not already aware of what a turnaround is then I'd recommend looking that up as that could give you a good indication of the actual 'day in the life' side of things!

Have you considered using something like Unibuddy to get to know Engineering students? One of our student ambassadors Zoe is nearing the end of her time as a Strathclyde student and I'm sure she'd be able to give you a great indication about studying and career options etc too! You can find her profile here if that interests you

Drop me a message any time if I can help with anything else! Best of luck with it!

- Caitlin
Official University of Strathclyde Rep
Hi Caitlin, thank you so much for the insight, that's really useful and I'll be sure to do a bit more digging!!
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