What access courses do King College University accept to study medicine?

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Kay34645
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Has anyone done an access course to go into medicine , if so what places would you suggest. Does the place that you take the course matter and how long did you do it for?
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becausethenight
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Kabzzzy is an access course student who may be able to help?
Otherwise email KCL specifically.
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Kabzzzy
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Thanks becausethenight!

Hi Kay! I've just finished an Access to Medicine & Medical Bioscience course and will be attending University in September to study Medicine. So it definitely works if you put in the work. I'm currently compiling a list of Universities that accept the course for a new TSR Wiki that becausethenight is creating. It might be easier if you suggest the Universities you're interested in and I can let you know from my list what the conditions are, as that page won't be up for another month or so. Alternatively, the majority of them should have it on their website entry requirements, though I did have to email quite a few of them to get additional details. I see KCL is mentioned, they do accept the Access course with the requirement of 39 distinctions and 6 merits for all level 3 modules.

In terms of the place you take the course, yes it does matter. I believe the Access courses are becoming more standardised next year but it's still worth doing your research. Some Universities are affiliated with certain colleges, so they will only accept their courses. Others may not be but tend to want a course that is accredited and conforms to the QAA descriptors. If you're in London, Morley College (highly recommend), City & Islington, and Lambeth are good options. I haven't really looked into any others as I'm based in London.

If you have any further questions, please do let me know!
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Kay34645
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Thanks becausethenight!

Hi Kay! I've just finished an Access to Medicine & Medical Bioscience course and will be attending University in September to study Medicine. So it definitely works if you put in the work. I'm currently compiling a list of Universities that accept the course for a new TSR Wiki that becausethenight is creating. It might be easier if you suggest the Universities you're interested in and I can let you know from my list what the conditions are, as that page won't be up for another month or so. Alternatively, the majority of them should have it on their website entry requirements, though I did have to email quite a few of them to get additional details. I see KCL is mentioned, they do accept the Access course with the requirement of 39 distinctions and 6 merits for all level 3 modules.

In terms of the place you take the course, yes it does matter. I believe the Access courses are becoming more standardised next year but it's still worth doing your research. Some Universities are affiliated with certain colleges, so they will only accept their courses. Others may not be but tend to want a course that is accredited and conforms to the QAA descriptors. If you're in London, Morley College (highly recommend), City & Islington, and Lambeth are good options. I haven't really looked into any others as I'm based in London.

If you have any further questions, please do let me know!
the universities that i am thinking of are Manchester ( they offer foundation courses for entry into medicine or dentistry so i wouldn't even have to complete an access course) , King College University ( i have heard a lot of good comments about it and it is still close enough so i can drive there and come back everyday so i can stay with my parents) , Kent University ( even closer to where i live )
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by Kay34645)
the universities that i am thinking of are Manchester ( they offer foundation courses for entry into medicine or dentistry so i wouldn't even have to complete an access course) , King College University ( i have heard a lot of good comments about it and it is still close enough so i can drive there and come back everyday so i can stay with my parents) , Kent University ( even closer to where i live )
Great! That's 3/4 of your choices sorted at least, I'll just copy and paste what I have written in my notes for you:

Manchester - if you're curious about their access offers: 45/45 distinctions with 15 grades being in Biology and 15 in chemistry. GCSE English language / Mathematics at B/6. Access course must be science based. Not accepted as a top-up to A-level grades that would not meet the normal entry requirements. Not accepted if you have previously studied at University. Must be out of education for at least 3 years. University asks you contact them if you have been out of education for more than 3 years but previously attained A-levels or post-16 qualifications to determine suitability of application.

Kings: 39 distinctions and 6 merits. Must be a medicine or dentistry course and must be QAA accredited. GCSE English language and Mathematics at 6/B.

KMMS: 30 distinctions and 15 merits. Must have 15 credits in Chemistry or Biology, with 12 being at distinction. It is advised that the course is licensed by QAA. Not considered if you have sat A-level or degree level examinations in the previous 3 years.

The good thing about your choices so far is that neither of them seem to require a course that is affiliated with a specific college. They seem to accept any relevant access course that is QAA accredited. (Which should be standard!) I think all 3 are great options. KMMS in particular seem very supportive of medical students entering through alternative pathways.

The only other thing I wanted to point out was the King's comment you made. It is very central, so while you may be kind of close, I'd be quite surprised if driving to University during peak hours is something that would actually be feasible in practice. Just something to keep in mind.
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Kay34645
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Great! That's 3/4 of your choices sorted at least, I'll just copy and paste what I have written in my notes for you:

Manchester - if you're curious about their access offers: 45/45 distinctions with 15 grades being in Biology and 15 in chemistry. GCSE English language / Mathematics at B/6. Access course must be science based. Not accepted as a top-up to A-level grades that would not meet the normal entry requirements. Not accepted if you have previously studied at University. Must be out of education for at least 3 years. University asks you contact them if you have been out of education for more than 3 years but previously attained A-levels or post-16 qualifications to determine suitability of application.

Kings: 39 distinctions and 6 merits. Must be a medicine or dentistry course and must be QAA accredited. GCSE English language and Mathematics at 6/B.

KMMS: 30 distinctions and 15 merits. Must have 15 credits in Chemistry or Biology, with 12 being at distinction. It is advised that the course is licensed by QAA. Not considered if you have sat A-level or degree level examinations in the previous 3 years.

The good thing about your choices so far is that neither of them seem to require a course that is affiliated with a specific college. They seem to accept any relevant access course that is QAA accredited. (Which should be standard!) I think all 3 are great options. KMMS in particular seem very supportive of medical students entering through alternative pathways.

The only other thing I wanted to point out was the King's comment you made. It is very central, so while you may be kind of close, I'd be quite surprised if driving to University during peak hours is something that would actually be feasible in practice. Just something to keep in mind.
thank you for the information. I was thinking my options would be
1) MANCHESTER UNI - FOUNDATION DENTISTRY
2) MANCHESTER UNI - FOUNDATION MEDICINE
3)KING COLLEGE UNIVERSITY ( IF I DO AN ACCESS COURSE) - DENTISTRY
4) KING COLLEGE UNIVERSITY ( IF I DO AN ACCESS COURSE) - MEDICINE
5) KENT UNIVERSITY - FOUNDATION PHARMACY
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by Kay34645)
thank you for the information. I was thinking my options would be
1) MANCHESTER UNI - FOUNDATION DENTISTRY
2) MANCHESTER UNI - FOUNDATION MEDICINE
3)KING COLLEGE UNIVERSITY ( IF I DO AN ACCESS COURSE) - DENTISTRY
4) KING COLLEGE UNIVERSITY ( IF I DO AN ACCESS COURSE) - MEDICINE
5) KENT UNIVERSITY - FOUNDATION PHARMACY
No problem! I know that Universities themselves don't share applicant info., as in they won't know what or who you're applying to. I'm just wondering if it's detrimental to apply to the same university for two different things. Both medicine and dentistry are incredibly competitive. Not only do you have the issue of submitting one personal statement to cover both, but it may work against you because other applicants will most likely be very sure of which path they want to pursue.

I don't know for sure if one admissions department covers both, but yeah I personally would see that as a negative if I was the one dealing with your application. Maybe do some research on that, or perhaps someone with more knowledge on that could chime in.
I know people sometimes apply to Medicine and Biomed as their 5th choice, but it's generally accepted as a back-up choice and likely option to get into graduate medicine later. That's the only scenario really where I think you can get away with applying to the same University with different courses.

But like I said, get some clarity on this! As far as the Access course goes, you should be able to apply to any of those courses. Do keep in mind though that my list was specifically for medicine. Pharmacy will have lower requirements, perhaps more availability, and dentistry I'd imagine would have lower availability.
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GANFYD
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
No problem! I know that Universities themselves don't share applicant info., as in they won't know what or who you're applying to. I'm just wondering if it's detrimental to apply to the same university for two different things. Both medicine and dentistry are incredibly competitive. Not only do you have the issue of submitting one personal statement to cover both, but it may work against you because other applicants will most likely be very sure of which path they want to pursue.

I don't know for sure if one admissions department covers both, but yeah I personally would see that as a negative if I was the one dealing with your application. Maybe do some research on that, or perhaps someone with more knowledge on that could chime in.
I know people sometimes apply to Medicine and Biomed as their 5th choice, but it's generally accepted as a back-up choice and likely option to get into graduate medicine later. That's the only scenario really where I think you can get away with applying to the same University with different courses.

But like I said, get some clarity on this! As far as the Access course goes, you should be able to apply to any of those courses. Do keep in mind though that my list was specifically for medicine. Pharmacy will have lower requirements, perhaps more availability, and dentistry I'd imagine would have lower availability.
Exactly! And does OP want to be a Dentist or a Dr? As they are very different careers.
Unis can see other courses you have applied to at their uni, I believe
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mispelt
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As someone who’s finally finished pharmacy and about to start GEM, I’m happy to answer any questions about pharmacy, but I just wanna mention; it’s not a good idea to do pharmacy or med or dentistry unless you actually want to do any of them. So if you want clarity on anything; ask away!
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bethlangley
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(Original post by mispelt)
As someone who’s finally finished pharmacy and about to start GEM, I’m happy to answer any questions about pharmacy, but I just wanna mention; it’s not a good idea to do pharmacy or med or dentistry unless you actually want to do any of them. So if you want clarity on anything; ask away!
Hiiii...I'm also a pharmacist and hoping to study GEM! I'm about to sit the UCAS and GAMSAT and finding it horrific whilst working full time! I would be so grateful for any tips!
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almostnearly
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Hi. did anyone have gcse science when applying to the access to medicine diploma?
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mispelt
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(Original post by bethlangley)
Hiiii...I'm also a pharmacist and hoping to study GEM! I'm about to sit the UCAS and GAMSAT and finding it horrific whilst working full time! I would be so grateful for any tips!
There’s actually a UCAT thread on here with some great advice. I’m personally the worst at advice because I didn’t do anything special, I just did all the questions on medify and was lucky enough to get 3120. I did have the experience of doing UCAT once before already too. I think just familiarising yourself with the exam and knowing all the eventualities was my only “thing”.

(I will add that it might be good to check FOIs for UCAT averages of the GEM schools and how they use them. Makes choosing schools easier and gives you an idea of what’s feasible)
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by almostnearly)
Hi. did anyone have gcse science when applying to the access to medicine diploma?
Hey there, I had all three core sciences at GCSE level. Though they didn't ask me for those. I believe they asked for Maths/English as evidence you would be able to follow the content, and then it was just a phone call interview to talk about expectations and where you want the course to lead to. Some may have a maths extrance exam, but I didn't have to do one probably because of COVID.
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bethlangley
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(Original post by bethlangley)
Hiiii...I'm also a pharmacist and hoping to study GEM! I'm about to sit the UCAS and GAMSAT and finding it horrific whilst working full time! I would be so grateful for any tips!
(Original post by mispelt)
There’s actually a UCAT thread on here with some great advice. I’m personally the worst at advice because I didn’t do anything special, I just did all the questions on medify and was lucky enough to get 3120. I did have the experience of doing UCAT once before already too. I think just familiarising yourself with the exam and knowing all the eventualities was my only “thing”.

(I will add that it might be good to check FOIs for UCAT averages of the GEM schools and how they use them. Makes choosing schools easier and gives you an idea of what’s feasible).
Thank you so much! Medify question bank is huge; did you do pretty much all the questions on there? I would be so grateful if you could please send me the link you found useful?
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username5796154
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Thanks becausethenight!

Hi Kay! I've just finished an Access to Medicine & Medical Bioscience course and will be attending University in September to study Medicine. So it definitely works if you put in the work. I'm currently compiling a list of Universities that accept the course for a new TSR Wiki that becausethenight is creating. It might be easier if you suggest the Universities you're interested in and I can let you know from my list what the conditions are, as that page won't be up for another month or so. Alternatively, the majority of them should have it on their website entry requirements, though I did have to email quite a few of them to get additional details. I see KCL is mentioned, they do accept the Access course with the requirement of 39 distinctions and 6 merits for all level 3 modules.

In terms of the place you take the course, yes it does matter. I believe the Access courses are becoming more standardised next year but it's still worth doing your research. Some Universities are affiliated with certain colleges, so they will only accept their courses. Others may not be but tend to want a course that is accredited and conforms to the QAA descriptors. If you're in London, Morley College (highly recommend), City & Islington, and Lambeth are good options. I haven't really looked into any others as I'm based in London.

If you have any further questions, please do let me know!
Why do you recommend Morley College?
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Kabzzzy
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Why do you recommend Morley College?
Personal recommendation as I went there and the staff were amazing to work with. Lots of students moving onto University as well.
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Personal recommendation as I went there and the staff were amazing to work with. Lots of students moving onto University as well.
Really? I've got an interview for their Access to Science course soon and was feeling a bit meh about it due to some of the reviews I've read. Great to hear you had a great experience.
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by RaeT)
Really? I've got an interview for their Access to Science course soon and was feeling a bit meh about it due to some of the reviews I've read. Great to hear you had a great experience.
I think one, potentially two depending on choices, of their tutors are different to the Medicine ones so I can't really comment. And I know the Science group biology contains more rather than focusing solely on human biology. But the course leader for the sciences is amazing. And you may also share some classes with the Medicine group, and people doing Nursing/Midwifery etc. Definitely highly recommended from me.
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almostnearly
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Hey there, I had all three core sciences at GCSE level. Though they didtn't ask me for those. I believe they asked for Maths/English as evidence you would be able to follow the content, and then it was just a phone call interview to talk about expectations and where you want the course to lead to. Some may have a maths extrance exam, but I didn't have to do one probably because of COVID.
thank you so much. Could I ask what your educational background + why you decided to take the course (and what sort of students were on the course (age range))? Were any students retaking GCSE exams simultaneously? I currently have a place at uni to study Psychology (I am able to transfer onto cognitive and clinical neuroscience in my second year). I don't have GCSEs or A-levels in any science (due to personal reasons) but I am heavily wanting to become a doctor and study medicine. Like other people, it took me some time to realize my potential and understand what I want to do with my life... so, do you believe taking an Access course would be a better idea. Or should I apply for graduate entry med (or undergraduate depending on the uni?) These are very personal decisions to make, I'm just wanting a second opinion from someone who has been successful with their access course. Many thanks.
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by almostnearly)
thank you so much. Could I ask what your educational background + why you decided to take the course (and what sort of students were on the course (age range))? Were any students retaking GCSE exams simultaneously? I currently have a place at uni to study Psychology (I am able to transfer onto cognitive and clinical neuroscience in my second year). I don't have GCSEs or A-levels in any science (due to personal reasons) but I am heavily wanting to become a doctor and study medicine. Like other people, it took me some time to realize my potential and understand what I want to do with my life... so, do you believe taking an Access course would be a better idea. Or should I apply for graduate entry med (or undergraduate depending on the uni?) These are very personal decisions to make, I'm just wanting a second opinion from someone who has been successful with their access course. Many thanks.
Edit: Sorry the essay.

No problem at all, I'm excited for you. And I absolutely agree that life experience can be a major factor into getting people into Medicine. I'd almost argue that I agree with the Americans, for once, that something like Medicine should be post-grad only as I feel it really is a calling that you need some life experience for.

Anyway... So I am degree educated, but in a field that has no relevance to Medicine. I also didn't want to go through the GEM route because I didn't think I'd be able to prepare for the GAMSAT, there's the extra competition, and I also just wanted to give myself the opportunity to get back into education before starting University. My GCSE grades were all A* to B, and I had done around 15 of them, so requirements wise it was just level 3 Chemistry that I was lacking, which the Access course provided.

Nobody in my class was taking GCSEs at the same time. Though one girl had just finished hers the year prior at the same College. I think in most cases just a 6/B in Maths and English Language will do, but sometimes the University may require a minimum of 5. It should, however, be highlighted that entry requirements won't always be the same for Access students everywhere, and this is because they understand that the whole point in the course is that the majority of people taking it may not have come from an academic background. Universities like KMMS (which I'm not going to) are really nice when it comes to evaluating candidates holistically and giving everyone a fair chance.

I think there are lots of factors that will affect your decision. As you mention, I can't really speculate as they are personal factors. However, if you're 100% sure you want to be a Doctor, I would not attend University for Psychology. You'll be dabbling into your student finance loans, assuming you're taking them. This means you'll have to fund part of the GEM course, IF you even get in. I say if because there is no doubt a level of luck when it comes to Medicine. There are far too many bright applicants out there, and the competition will be fierce over the next few years due to the CAGs and other factors. GEM is even more competitive, so you're lowering your chances even further.

If time is not a limiting factor, my suggestion would be to get your GCSEs first. Do a bit of research, pick out 4 Universities and see their exact requirements. It should most likely only be Maths and English language (even some Access Colleges may require you to do this before you're allowed on the course). Do some medical work experience alongside this, as 2 GCSEs should not take up too much time. Volunteer in hospitals, or shadow a Doctor. Anything that gives you relevant experience so you can show you know how a clinical environment works, and that you still want to pursue the career.

In the summer time (so the year of the application cycle), make sure you spend a good 2 months or so learning what the UCAT exam is and practicing for it. This will quite literally determine if you get interviews at University or not. It's just that brutal because there are so many applicants that need to be filtered out. You don't want to be doing this alongside your Access course. You'll already be juggling UCAS applications and interview prep during the course!

If you have the time to do A-levels, I would suggest that as well. For me it wasn't an option. I'm already 28 and I didn't want to spend 2 years working on that. But if you have the time, at least you'll know your qualifications will be accepted at any Medical school. (I feel like I have to mention that!) I think I opted for the Access course mostly because of it only taking up one academic year. But as I learnt more about it, I thought it was much more suited as I wouldn't be spending time learning about A-level Plant Biology / Ecology (mostly unrelated to Medicine).

But moving onto Access. It's such a great way to get your level 3 qualifications when you know exactly what you want to do in life. You can definitely sustain a part-time job while doing this. I know some who had a full-time job, but I honestly would not recommend that as a Medicine applicant. They were mostly applying to other degrees. I think it will be a nice progression for you because you'll experience level 2 education and then level 3. And the level 3 will only last one academic year as you'll only be learning what is relevant to the degree you want to pursue. In some cases you could also do all of this at the same institution. Two of my classmates who wanted to do different degrees have also got a place at University. And the two other Medicine students, one has a place and is deferring entry to 2022, and the other was not successful this year due to a low UCAT score for not knowing what it was until College started, but has achieved the grades to apply next year. They were also a similar age range. One was early 40s, the rest of us were between 23 and 30. So overall I'd say my class was successful, and I know a lot of the other Science groups were also progressing to University.

It sounds like there is a lot to do, and honestly there is. You need to think of it all step-by-step or you'll overwhelm yourself. But I believe it's a good way to get you into a good work ethic, as there's no doubt it'll be useful for when University starts. Just be prepared to do your research. As it stands now, there are some Universities that are affiliated with certain Colleges, not many but a few. Hopefully we'll have our Access entry requirements page up way before you start applying anyway. Look forward to it!

All the best, and feel free to message me if you have any more questions!!
Last edited by Kabzzzy; 1 month ago
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