Worried about no money in electrical engineering UK. Career path?? Should I do it?

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Torrential1
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I'm thinking of pursuing a future in Electrical engineering in the uk. I'm thinking if applying to Imperial Collage London as it seems by far the best choice in the uk.

However, I'm concerned how little money electrical engineers make. I've enjoyed messing with electronics and building stuff since I was small but money has also been a big thing to me always.

Now many of my cousins have went to simple low tier universities and within 10 years are on 6 figures in industries like construction.

I'm thinking of going to a world class uni and working much harder than any of them did and in having trouble imagining I'll be on 6 figures even at all forget 10 years

I've been thinking of other things I can do and I was thinking maybe I could do an MBA or something after 3 or 4 years if work (once I finish a MEng degree). But this is seeming like a long and hard route.

But I do really enjoy electrical engineering but eventually id probably end up enjoying a field such as construction too I feel (I find myself quite well rounded).

Is it possible to make good money in not a too long time in electrical engineering (specifically in the uk) and what do you guys advise is the best career route to this. I only have another 2 months until I must be 100% certain so I'm just trying to make sure I'm know what I'm going into.

Thank you.
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chazwomaq
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>£100000 in construction after a few year's experience? Really?
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babatunde_
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If you do an engineering degree from imperial you still have a solid shot at getting into economics related jobs such as investment banking and so on.
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Nobalitude
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(Original post by The Torrent)
I'm thinking of pursuing a future in Electrical engineering in the uk. I'm thinking if applying to Imperial Collage London as it seems by far the best choice in the uk.

However, I'm concerned how little money electrical engineers make. I've enjoyed messing with electronics and building stuff since I was small but money has also been a big thing to me always.

Now many of my cousins have went to simple low tier universities and within 10 years are on 6 figures in industries like construction.

I'm thinking of going to a world class uni and working much harder than any of them did and in having trouble imagining I'll be on 6 figures even at all forget 10 years

I've been thinking of other things I can do and I was thinking maybe I could do an MBA or something after 3 or 4 years if work (once I finish a MEng degree). But this is seeming like a long and hard route.

But I do really enjoy electrical engineering but eventually id probably end up enjoying a field such as construction too I feel (I find myself quite well rounded).

Is it possible to make good money in not a too long time in electrical engineering (specifically in the uk) and what do you guys advise is the best career route to this. I only have another 2 months until I must be 100% certain so I'm just trying to make sure I'm know what I'm going into.

Thank you.
Don't listen to the Babatunde guy above me. He needs to drink some water.

I think you should be fine with regards to money with an EEE degree from Imperial (on par with Cambridge engineering prestige) simply because the top companies in the industry will want to employ you because of the rep of the university and as long as you score well in the interview. Don't go into an EEE degree thinking you're going to do something else in the future such as economics-related stuff. Do what you love, and chances are because you're going to one of the most renowned universities in the world for science, you should have little to no problems securing a decent job, and trust me, you will easily earn more than your cousins. I actually think they're lying to you, because I haven't heard someone earn so much in construction; don't be naive, they only want to impress you.
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ajj2000
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What sort of jobs do your cousins do in construction?

Are you paying local or overseas fees at imperial?
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leviticus.
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(Original post by Nobalitude)
Don't listen to the Babatunde guy above me. He needs to drink some water.

I think you should be fine with regards to money with an EEE degree from Imperial (on par with Cambridge engineering prestige) simply because the top companies in the industry will want to employ you because of the rep of the university and as long as you score well in the interview. Don't go into an EEE degree thinking you're going to do something else in the future such as economics-related stuff. Do what you love, and chances are because you're going to one of the most renowned universities in the world for science, you should have little to no problems securing a decent job, and trust me, you will easily earn more than your cousins. I actually think they're lying to you, because I haven't heard someone earn so much in construction; don't be naive, they only want to impress you.
literally nothing wrong with doing EEE and then wanting to do investment banking/consulting/quant trading (although calling either of these economics-related suggests the person doesn't know what they do) especially at imperial. You can like the degree of engineering and not want to become an engineer.
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Nobalitude
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(Original post by leviticus.)
literally nothing wrong with doing EEE and then wanting to do investment banking/consulting/quant trading (although calling either of these economics-related suggests the person doesn't know what they do) especially at imperial. You can like the degree of engineering and not want to become an engineer.
I completely agree with you with that statement, but I was simply stating that OP shouldn't go into EEE knowing full well they're looking to go into finance; in that case, it would be better to do something like Maths or Economics. EEE is an exceptionally hard degree, and that is exaggerated ten folds by going to one of the best universities in the country for that chosen subject. If you are not sure about whether to do the degree or not, chances are you will hate the degree and quit it, or not perform as well. OP, only do EEE if you like the course and looking to mainly get a job in that industry, but keep in the very back of your mind you could branch out into finance, just because of the university prestige.
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leviticus.
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(Original post by Nobalitude)
I completely agree with you with that statement, but I was simply stating that OP shouldn't go into EEE knowing full well they're looking to go into finance; in that case, it would be better to do something like Maths or Economics. EEE is an exceptionally hard degree, and that is exaggerated ten folds by going to one of the best universities in the country for that chosen subject. If you are not sure about whether to do the degree or not, chances are you will hate the degree and quit it, or not perform as well. OP, only do EEE if you like the course and looking to mainly get a job in that industry, but keep in the very back of your mind you could branch out into finance, just because of the university prestige.
Even if they wanted to go into finance its fine, afaik EEE isn't vocational, and plenty of finance jobs require engineering degrees/similar ones hence why i mentioned quant trading. Economics has v little to do w what a financial institution actually does, finance would be a better degree but not many target schools offer it. Law and engineering aren't explicitly vocational in this country, unlike Medicine, I don't see an issue w studying EEE knowing you want to end up in finance but find EEE interesting and want to pursue it at university. STEM seems to be viewed more favourably by banks nowadays anyway than econ/finance - go to university to study the degree because you like it as an academic discipline, outside of a given career.
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Torrential1
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
>£100000 in construction after a few year's experience? Really?
by age 30 yes.

And this is with degrees of no real substance really, from not top 100 unis and random degrees like economics or equivalent. it is working in london tho.

(Original post by Nobalitude)
Don't listen to the Babatunde guy above me. He needs to drink some water.

I think you should be fine with regards to money with an EEE degree from Imperial (on par with Cambridge engineering prestige) simply because the top companies in the industry will want to employ you because of the rep of the university and as long as you score well in the interview. Don't go into an EEE degree thinking you're going to do something else in the future such as economics-related stuff. Do what you love, and chances are because you're going to one of the most renowned universities in the world for science, you should have little to no problems securing a decent job, and trust me, you will easily earn more than your cousins. I actually think they're lying to you, because I haven't heard someone earn so much in construction; don't be naive, they only want to impress you.
(Original post by ajj2000)
What sort of jobs do your cousins do in construction?

Are you paying local or overseas fees at imperial?
they haven't told me anything but trust me if you saw them you can tell they are on 6 digits ++++ and yes there is a lot of money in construction in london but im talking more managemetn side of construction tbf.
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Torrential1
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Just a bump as I'm still kinda worried.
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leviticus.
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Idk what else people can tell you, if you wan money there are a range of careers you can go into with an engineering degree - proprietary trading being the highest paid, investment banking and allied careers like trading/AM, strategy consulting and finally even corporate law. Unsure what else to add really, provided you get into a top school pretty much all doors are open to you. If you want to work in electrical engineering itself then I don’t know.
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ajj2000
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(Original post by The Torrent)
by age 30 yes.

And this is with degrees of no real substance really, from not top 100 unis and random degrees like economics or equivalent. it is working in london tho.



they haven't told me anything but trust me if you saw them you can tell they are on 6 digits ++++ and yes there is a lot of money in construction in london but im talking more managemetn side of construction tbf.
I’m an accountant who has worked in areas adjacent to construction for years. I’ve seen a lot of payrolls. I certainly know that there are plenty of people like your cousins working as site managers , quantity surveyors etc who are earning very well with 10 years experience. Their degrees were irrelevant in this.

You could do the same with an eee degree - if anything it would be easier to get work and progress. That being said engineering degrees are a lot of hard work. It should be noted that construction jobs are highly cyclical - when the industry slows there really is no work.

People in construction earn money through their personal qualities more than their qualifications far more than in areas like engineering. Both can be great options - eee probably gives you a lot more routes in life.
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Torrential1
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I’m an accountant who has worked in areas adjacent to construction for years. I’ve seen a lot of payrolls. I certainly know that there are plenty of people like your cousins working as site managers , quantity surveyors etc who are earning very well with 10 years experience. Their degrees were irrelevant in this.

You could do the same with an eee degree - if anything it would be easier to get work and progress. That being said engineering degrees are a lot of hard work. It should be noted that construction jobs are highly cyclical - when the industry slows there really is no work.

People in construction earn money through their personal qualities more than their qualifications far more than in areas like engineering. Both can be great options - eee probably gives you a lot more routes in life.
Site managers and quantity surveyors exactly the jobs I was referring to haha. Yes I understand what you mean but this is what's bringing me to my dilemna. If I can do just as well with a lesser uni is there any reason to go through 4 years of hell at imperial + no social life when I can achieve the same and have a lot more fun going elsewhere... I just don't wanna make the wrong choice.....
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angryboi
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I’m an accountant who has worked in areas adjacent to construction for years. I’ve seen a lot of payrolls. I certainly know that there are plenty of people like your cousins working as site managers , quantity surveyors etc who are earning very well with 10 years experience. Their degrees were irrelevant in this.

You could do the same with an eee degree - if anything it would be easier to get work and progress. That being said engineering degrees are a lot of hard work. It should be noted that construction jobs are highly cyclical - when the industry slows there really is no work.

People in construction earn money through their personal qualities more than their qualifications far more than in areas like engineering. Both can be great options - eee probably gives you a lot more routes in life.
£100k+ though?
Glassdoor and payscale say the average is £45k and the 90th percentile is £65k for site managers; 35k and 49k for quantity surveyers.
Also, what's the proportion of site managers/QS's getting paid £100k+ (if they do indeed get paid this), it can't be that high at all.
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Zarek
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So you’re putting the cart before the horse. No degree automatically offers 6 figure salaries within a few years. Even prestigious vocational subjects like law and medicine you have to work your way up the ladder. Conversely every degree can lead to good career progression if you have ability. Blue chip companies have ‘future leaders’ schemes to recruit bright graduates for just such a reason. Also being an engineer is a very credible profession. So pick the subject you enjoy, get a 1st, find a job with a good company and work on your meteoric rise to CEO or start your own business.
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MSTSR
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Better go for Maths with Economics from LSE if you really want to go towards finance side…In EEE no further scope compare to Maths with Economics especially in UK
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leviticus.
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(Original post by MSTSR)
Better go for Maths with Economics from LSE if you really want to go towards finance side…In EEE no further scope compare to Maths with Economics especially in UK
Untrue, please stop spreading misinformation. LSE is explicitly not a strong brand name when it comes to quantitative finance careers in comparison to imperial too, for traditional finance both are targets and degree choice is irrelevant.
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MSTSR
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(Original post by leviticus.)
Untrue, please stop spreading misinformation. LSE is explicitly not a strong brand name when it comes to quantitative finance careers in comparison to imperial too, for traditional finance both are targets and degree choice is irrelevant.
No it is true…if you finally want to go towards Finance side there is no better option than LSE maths with Economics….Imperial is good for technical and research side…And who says LSE is not having a brand!!! Especially when you want to go towards finance n banking sector
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leviticus.
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(Original post by MSTSR)
No it is true…if you finally want to go towards Finance side there is no better option than LSE maths with Economics….Imperial is good for technical and research side…And who says LSE is not having a brand!!! Especially when you want to go towards finance n banking sector
LSE doesn’t guarantee anything, both imperial and LSE are target schools for investment banks so both get first round interviews… and learn to read, I said for quantitative finance Imperial is much much stronger. Most quant funds and prop shops like Citsec, Optiver, 5 rings hire out of Oxbridge and Imperial, they don’t typically recruit from LSE. For traditional finance LSE has better alumni connections and networking opportunities no doubt but the degree itself is irrelevant, people can go into investment banking with philosophy degrees…

For big investment banks like bulge brackets you can’t network into interviews, everyone applies online and both imperial and LSE are target schools and will get you interviews Ceteris paribus. Doing engineering at imperial is perfectly fine and probably better as it means op is a target for traditional finance and quantitative finance.
There are many sources you can use to verify this; WSO and TSR have dedicated target school threads.
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