The Student Room Group
Original post by Nadiaquin28
When I say that I want to go to the army to be an army doctor, everyone says that I am going to die.Is it true?And do you guys really pay that amount of money each year.ITs not really the money although it would help me and my family a lot but it is mostly because I love medicine and I love the army so could you help me please

you can do a medical degree at 18, then join the army at 23 as an officer ( I think ) once you're done. I'm a current medical applicant and this is what I'm wanting to do too atm :smile: What do you mean pay? the degree is fixed at 9250 pounds a year, and you can check the salary ( I think it's 40,000? ) as an army physician. Death is unlikely, check the stats but as a doctor you'll be a lot safer than other members of the forces I think :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by CatInTheCorner
you can do a medical degree at 18, then join the army at 23 as an officer ( I think ) once you're done. I'm a current medical applicant and this is what I'm wanting to do too atm :smile: What do you mean pay? the degree is fixed at 9250 pounds a year, and you can check the salary ( I think it's 40,000? ) as an army physician. Death is unlikely, check the stats but as a doctor you'll be a lot safer than other members of the forces I think :smile:

thanks its just there is a page saying that i can do 3 years of uni and in year 3 4 and 5 I receive £10k each year then I do 12 weeks training as a military officer and then I am expected to serve 6 years as an army officer, then I will receive £45k as a thank you and another 90k award
Original post by Nadiaquin28
thanks its just there is a page saying that i can do 3 years of uni and in year 3 4 and 5 I receive £10k each year then I do 12 weeks training as a military officer and then I am expected to serve 6 years as an army officer, then I will receive £45k as a thank you and another 90k award

post the link, but that sounds a lot like just doing a medical degree but having army funding on the condition you join afterwards. What year are you in?
Reply 4
Original post by CatInTheCorner
post the link, but that sounds a lot like just doing a medical degree but having army funding on the condition you join afterwards. What year are you in?

I am in high school, in year 11 and I am just digging a bit because I really want to plan my future
Reply 5
Original post by Nadiaquin28
thanks its just there is a page saying that i can do 3 years of uni and in year 3 4 and 5 I receive £10k each year then I do 12 weeks training as a military officer and then I am expected to serve 6 years as an army officer, then I will receive £45k as a thank you and another 90k award

You can apply for bursaries/scholarships while studying and you'll get a wage on the condition that you serve for X number of years post qualifying.

Original post by Nadiaquin28
When I say that I want to go to the army to be an army doctor, everyone says that I am going to die.Is it true?

This is utter garbage and said only by people who don't have a clue about the Army.

Go to the careers site and have a look, all the information is there.
Reply 6
Original post by Drewski
You can apply for bursaries/scholarships while studying and you'll get a wage on the condition that you serve for X number of years post qualifying.


This is utter garbage and said only by people who don't have a clue about the Army.

Go to the careers site and have a look, all the information is there.


thanks
Reply 7
Hi Everyone,

You may have though about becoming a Doctor, but not necessarily with the British Army,

Are you aware, that if you choose to become a doctor, as an Officer with the British Army you can get some serious funding at uni!

So say you have decided you want to study medicine at Uni you should consider the Army Officer route. This requires you to apply and attend a few selection assessments. If you pass you can apply for a medical bursary. this will be awarded to you from year 3 of uni onwards.

You will be awarded £10k in year 3, £10k in year 4, £10k in year 5. Once your qualified, you spend your first 2 foundation years practicing as usual but earning an enhanced Army Officer wage of around £50k per year.

At the end of that second foundation year you will need to spend 12 weeks at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in order to qualify as a Professionally Qualified Officer.

Once thats done........you are given £45k thank you very much bonus! You will then be expected to serve a further 6 years with the army as a doctor reaching a wage, (8 years post uni) of around £90k

As a doctor you could be treating casualties on the front line, caring for soldiers’ sick family members or providing medical cover for Army sports events. You’re highly trained and play a vital role in keeping Army personnel fighting fit.

You’re trained to deal with the specialist health problems found in the course of military duty, as well as the routine medical complaints found at home. You can specialise in general practice, hospital care or public health/occupational medicine. You also learn to lead and motivate those in your charge.

If this is something that you would be interested in get in touch!
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=1251




Hi this was from someone called army jobs that is where I saw it
ps: sorry for just replying now i was looking for it
Reply 8
Hiii. Sorry that this is so late but I hope it can help! To start, within your first year of medical school you can apply for the medical bursary with the army. If you get approved for the full amount, from years 3-5 of medical school you get annual instalments of around £10,000 to pay for the degree. You also have to have interviews and physical and mental tests with the Army Officer Selection Board within some point of your degree. Once you graduate med school, you do an 8-10 week Commissioning Course Short as a PQO (Professionally Qualified Officer, so the doctors, dentists, lawyers etc.) at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst where you leave with the rank of an officer, so a lieutenant or captain. Upon finishing Sandhurst, you get a ‘lump sum’ of £45,000, which concludes the medical bursary. After that, you have to do your two foundation years like a GP does in England at one of the hospitals they mention (for example the QE in Birmingham), and you earn army salary during these years, which is about £41,000 annually give or take. Once you’ve done that, you spend 3 years as a GDMO (General Duties Medical Officer) before you can become an RMO (Regimental Medical Officer) or a specialist like a surgeon. Within these years you first learn how to treat trauma injuries and everything like that, and once you’ve done that you can be posted anywhere. Many GDMOs have said that they move around a lot. I’m not an army doctor yet but that’s the route I’m planning to take and I’ve done a lot of research so this is just me speaking from what ive found. I hope this helps and let me know if you have any more questions! :smile:
(edited 2 years ago)
I'm curious, where do doctors in the British Army typically work? Is it the case of constantly moving around?
Reply 10
Everything I found out was from intensive research lol I’m not an actual doctor yet but have read things written by army doctors.
(edited 2 years ago)
Reply 11
Original post by Satori Tendō
I'm curious, where do doctors in the British Army typically work? Is it the case of constantly moving around?


Hiii. From what I’ve read they can pretty much be stationed anywhere overseas once they’ve completed their training, and many of them have said that they do move around a lot but they love it because they get to see the world.
Reply 12
Original post by simdevi
Hiii. Sorry that this is so late but I hope it can help! To start, within your first year of medical school you can apply for the medical bursary with the army. If you get approved for the full amount, from years 3-5 of medical school you get annual instalments of around £10,000 to pay for the degree. You also have to have interviews and physical and mental tests with the Army Officer Selection Board within some point of your degree. Once you graduate med school, you do an 8-10 week Commissioning Course Short as a PQO (Professionally Qualified Officer, so the doctors, dentists, lawyers etc.) at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst where you leave with the rank of an officer, so a lieutenant or captain. Upon finishing Sandhurst, you get a ‘lump sum’ of £45,000, which concludes the medical bursary. After that, you have to do your two foundation years like a GP does in England at one of the hospitals they mention (for example the QE in Birmingham), and you earn army salary during these years, which is about £41,000 annually give or take. Once you’ve done that, you spend 3 years as a GDMO (General Duties Medical Officer) before you can become an RMO (Regimental Medical Officer) or a specialist like a surgeon. Within these years you first learn how to treat trauma injuries and everything like that, and once you’ve done that you can be posted anywhere. Many GDMOs have said that they move around a lot. I’m not an army doctor yet but that’s the route I’m planning to take and I’ve done a lot of research so this is just me speaking from what ive found. I hope this helps and let me know if you have any more questions! :smile:

Love the amount of research! You are almost completely correct, but you won't go to RMAS until after FY1&2, (and then after RMAS you get the bonus as you said).
Reply 13
Original post by Satori Tendō
I'm curious, where do doctors in the British Army typically work? Is it the case of constantly moving around?

Most work in the UK, but many also work abroad, usually at the larger Army bases (Germany, Brunei, Cyprus etc..).
You normally move every 3 years, but can be more frequent.
Original post by Nadiaquin28
When I say that I want to go to the army to be an army doctor, everyone says that I am going to die.Is it true?And do you guys really pay that amount of money each year.ITs not really the money although it would help me and my family a lot but it is mostly because I love medicine and I love the army so could you help me please


If you are not properly trained and set to a dangerous deployment (Afghanistan/Iraq) then probably yes..
You will learn all the life skills as well as medical training, so this entirely depends on your training and deployment (which every military officer will have to do eventually)
(edited 2 years ago)
Original post by simdevi
Hiii. Sorry that this is so late but I hope it can help! To start, within your first year of medical school you can apply for the medical bursary with the army. If you get approved for the full amount, from years 3-5 of medical school you get annual instalments of around £10,000 to pay for the degree. You also have to have interviews and physical and mental tests with the Army Officer Selection Board within some point of your degree. Once you graduate med school, you do an 8-10 week Commissioning Course Short as a PQO (Professionally Qualified Officer, so the doctors, dentists, lawyers etc.) at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst where you leave with the rank of an officer, so a lieutenant or captain. Upon finishing Sandhurst, you get a ‘lump sum’ of £45,000, which concludes the medical bursary. After that, you have to do your two foundation years like a GP does in England at one of the hospitals they mention (for example the QE in Birmingham), and you earn army salary during these years, which is about £41,000 annually give or take. Once you’ve done that, you spend 3 years as a GDMO (General Duties Medical Officer) before you can become an RMO (Regimental Medical Officer) or a specialist like a surgeon. Within these years you first learn how to treat trauma injuries and everything like that, and once you’ve done that you can be posted anywhere. Many GDMOs have said that they move around a lot. I’m not an army doctor yet but that’s the route I’m planning to take and I’ve done a lot of research so this is just me speaking from what ive found. I hope this helps and let me know if you have any more questions! :smile:


hi, i was wondering if you knew what the route would be for me as I am taking a gap year? I am currently in year 13. do you think I can apply for the bursary before I start uni or still have to do it in my first year? also did you do any extra kind of work experience/cadets/CCF to improve your chances of getting into the army, or are most candidates accepted? many thanks
Reply 16
Original post by bloss floss
hi, i was wondering if you knew what the route would be for me as I am taking a gap year? I am currently in year 13. do you think I can apply for the bursary before I start uni or still have to do it in my first year? also did you do any extra kind of work experience/cadets/CCF to improve your chances of getting into the army, or are most candidates accepted? many thanks

Hi I’m planning to take same route and I’m going to in year 13 and then plan to take a gap year , what did u end up choosing to do ?

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